Seagen to Highlight Overall Survival Data for PADCEV® and TIVDAK® during Presidential Symposium at ESMO Congress 2023

 

 

– Late-breaking results from global Phase 3 confirmatory studies of PADCEV (EV-302) in locally advanced or metastatic bladder cancer and TIVDAK (innovaTV 301) in recurrent or metastatic cervical cancer to be included in the ESMO Communication Activities –

 

BOTHELL, Wash.--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- Seagen, Inc.  (Nasdaq: SGEN) today announced the upcoming presentation of detailed results from two pivotal Phase 3 studies at the ESMO Congress 2023. Results from the EV-302 study of PADCEV (enfortumab vedotin-ejfv) plus KEYTRUDA® (pembrolizumab) in locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer (la/mUC) in the first-line setting will be presented during a Presidential Symposium at the Congress. Seagen will also present results from the innovaTV 301 study of TIVDAK (tisotumab vedotin-tftv) compared with chemotherapy in adults with recurrent or metastatic cervical cancer during the same Presidential Symposium. Both presentations are included in the ESMO Communication Activities. Seagen is sharing a total of six abstracts, including five oral presentations at ESMO this year, taking place October 20–24, 2023 in Madrid, Spain.

“Seagen is excited to share these new overall survival data and the prospect of PADCEV and TIVDAK to benefit people living with cancer. We are also proud of the antibody-drug conjugate technology that Seagen has pioneered for 25 years and its impact on the treatment of cancer,” said Roger Dansey, M.D., President, Research and Development and Chief Medical Officer at Seagen. “From the beginning, we have been driven by science with the goal of advancing innovation to improve and extend the lives of people with cancer who have few treatment options. We look forward to discussing these latest pivotal data with regulatory authorities as we work to bring transformative care to more patients.”

Committed to Transforming Care in Bladder Cancer with PADCEV

PADCEV data will detail results of the EV-302 study, which met its dual primary endpoints of overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS), compared to chemotherapy. An Independent Data Monitoring Committee determined that OS crossed the pre-specified efficacy boundary at interim analysis. The safety results of the combination are consistent with those of PADCEV in combination with pembrolizumab previously reported in cisplatin-ineligible patients with la/mUC. The EV-302 trial is intended to serve as the basis for global submissions and as the confirmatory trial for the U.S. accelerated approval of this combination.

EV-302 is a global, randomized Phase 3 study that evaluated PADCEV, developed in partnership with Astellas, in combination with Merck’s anti-PD-1 therapy KEYTRUDA in the first-line setting for adult patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer, who were eligible for cisplatin- or carboplatin-containing chemotherapy regardless of PD-L1 status.

Additional PADCEV data that will be shared at ESMO include results from EV-103 Cohort L, which show the potential of PADCEV as a monotherapy in cis-ineligible patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). Due to high rates of recurrence in cis-ineligible MIBC patients, there is an urgent need for effective treatment options.

Aiming to Address Unmet Need in Cervical Cancer with TIVDAK

Detailed results from the global Phase 3 innovaTV 301 study evaluating TIVDAK in recurrent or metastatic cervical cancer patients with disease progression on or after front-line therapy who received TIVDAK, compared with chemotherapy alone, will also be highlighted at ESMO. An Independent Data Monitoring Committee determined that OS crossed the pre-specified efficacy boundary at interim analysis. The key alpha-controlled secondary endpoints of investigator-assessed progression-free survival and objective response rate also demonstrated statistical significance. The safety profile of TIVDAK in innovaTV 301 was consistent with the known safety profile of TIVDAK as presented in the U.S. prescribing information, and no new safety signals were observed.

TIVDAK is being developed in partnership with Genmab. Subject to discussions with regulatory authorities, the results from innovaTV 301 are intended to serve as the pivotal confirmatory trial for the U.S. accelerated approval and support global regulatory applications.

Advancing a Pipeline of Novel Targeted Cancer Therapies

Early clinical data from a Phase 1 study of SGN-B7H4V, a wholly owned vedotin ADC directed to B7-H4, will be shared at ESMO. B7-H4 is a member of the B7 family of immune checkpoint ligands and its expression is elevated on a variety of solid tumors, including breast, ovarian, and endometrial cancers.

Key data presentations for Seagen at ESMO 2023 include:

Abstract Title

Abstract #

Presentation Time

Lead Author

Enfortumab Vedotin

EV-302/KEYNOTE-A39: Open-Label, Randomized Phase 3 Study of Enfortumab Vedotin in Combination with Pembrolizumab (EV+P) Vs Chemotherapy (Chemo) in Previously Untreated Locally Advanced Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma (la/mUC)

LBA6

Presidential Symposium

(Oral Presentation)

Sunday, Oct. 22

4:30 PM CEST

T. Powles

Study EV-103 Cohort L: Perioperative treatment with enfortumab vedotin (EV) monotheraphy in cisplatin (cis)-ineligible patients (pts) w/ muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC)

2365MO

Mini Oral Presentation

Sunday, Oct 22

10:45 AM CEST

S. Sridhar

Tisotumab Vedotin

innovaTV 301/ENGOT-cx12/GOG-3057: A Global, Randomized, Open-Label, Phase 3 Study of Tisotumab Vedotin vs Investigator’s Choice of Chemotherapy in 2L or 3L Recurrent or Metastatic Cervical Cancer

LBA9

Presidential Symposium

(Oral Presentation)

Sunday, Oct. 22

5:22 PM CEST

I. Vergote

Tucatinib

Impact of baseline molecular alterations on the efficacy of tucatinib (TUC) plus trastuzumab (Tras) for HER2+, RAS WT metastatic CRC (mCRC) in MOUNTAINEER

5510

Proffered Paper

(Oral Presentation)

Saturday, Oct 21

3:45 PM CEST

J. Strickler

Phase 2 dose optimization results from MOUNTAINEER-02: A study of tucatinib, trastuzumab, ramucirumab, and paclitaxel for HER2+ gastroesophageal cancer (GEC)

1523P

Poster

Monday, Oct. 23

9 AM – 5 PM CEST

M. Tehfe

Early Pipeline

First-in-human study of SGN-B7H4V, a B7-H4-directed vedotin ADC, in patients with advanced solid tumors: Preliminary results of a phase 1 study (SGNB7H4V-001)

660MO

Mini Oral Presentation

Monday, Oct. 23

5:05 PM CEST

C. Perez

PADCEV (enfortumab vedotin-ejfv) U.S. Indication & Important Safety Information

BOXED WARNING: SERIOUS SKIN REACTIONS

  • PADCEV can cause severe and fatal cutaneous adverse reactions including Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (TEN), which occurred predominantly during the first cycle of treatment, but may occur later.
  • Closely monitor patients for skin reactions.
  • Immediately withhold PADCEV and consider referral for specialized care for suspected SJS or TEN or severe skin reactions.
  • Permanently discontinue PADCEV in patients with confirmed SJS or TEN; or Grade 4 or recurrent Grade 3 skin reactions.

Indication

PADCEV, as a single agent, is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer (mUC) who:

  • have previously received a programmed death receptor-1 (PD-1) or programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) inhibitor and platinum-containing chemotherapy, or
  • are ineligible for cisplatin-containing chemotherapy and have previously received one or more prior lines of therapy.1

PADCEV, in combination with pembrolizumab, is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer (mUC) who are not eligible for cisplatin-containing chemotherapy.1

This indication is approved under accelerated approval based on tumor response rate and durability of response. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in confirmatory trials.

Important Safety Information

Warnings and Precautions

Skin reactions Severe cutaneous adverse reactions, including fatal cases of SJS or TEN occurred in patients treated with PADCEV. SJS and TEN occurred predominantly during the first cycle of treatment but may occur later. Skin reactions occurred in 56% (all grades) of the 753 patients treated with PADCEV as a single agent in clinical trials. Twenty-four percent (24%) of patients had maculo-papular rash and 33% had pruritus. Grade 3-4 skin reactions occurred in 12% of patients, including maculo-papular rash, erythematous rash, rash or drug eruption, symmetrical drug-related intertriginous and flexural exanthema (SDRIFE), bullous dermatitis, exfoliative dermatitis, and palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia. The median time to onset of severe skin reactions was 0.7 months (range: 0.1 to 6 months). Among patients experiencing a skin reaction leading to dose interruption who then restarted PADCEV (n=59), 24% of patients restarting at the same dose and 16% of patients restarting at a reduced dose experienced recurrent severe skin reactions. Skin reactions led to discontinuation of PADCEV in 2.6% of patients.

When PADCEV was given in combination with pembrolizumab, the incidence of skin reactions, including severe events, occurred at a higher rate. Skin reactions occurred in 72% (all grades) of the 121 patients treated with PADCEV in combination with pembrolizumab in clinical trials. The majority of the skin reactions that occurred with combination therapy included maculo-papular rash, macular rash and papular rash. Grade 3-4 skin reactions occurred in 20% of patients (Grade 3: 19%, Grade 4: 0.8%), including maculo-papular rash, bullous dermatitis, dermatitis, exfoliative dermatitis, pemphigoid, rash, erythematous rash, macular rash, and papular rash. A fatal reaction of bullous dermatitis occurred in one patient (0.8%). The median time to onset of severe skin reactions was 2.6 months (range: 0.3 to 16 months). Skin reactions led to discontinuation of PADCEV in 6% of patients. Monitor patients closely throughout treatment for skin reactions. Consider topical corticosteroids and antihistamines, as clinically indicated. For persistent or recurrent Grade 2 skin reactions, consider withholding PADCEV until Grade ≤1. Withhold PADCEV and refer for specialized care for suspected SJS, TEN or for Grade 3 skin reactions. Permanently discontinue PADCEV in patients with confirmed SJS or TEN; or Grade 4 or recurrent Grade 3 skin reactions.

Hyperglycemia and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Hyperglycemia and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), including fatal events, occurred in patients with and without pre-existing diabetes mellitus, treated with PADCEV. Patients with baseline hemoglobin A1C ≥8% were excluded from clinical trials. In clinical trials of PADCEV as a single agent, 14% of the 753 patients treated with PADCEV developed hyperglycemia; 7% of patients developed Grade 3-4 hyperglycemia. Fatal events of hyperglycemia and diabetic ketoacidosis occurred in one patient each (0.1%). The incidence of Grade 3-4 hyperglycemia increased consistently in patients with higher body mass index and in patients with higher baseline A1C. Five percent (5%) of patients required initiation of insulin therapy for treatment of hyperglycemia. The median time to onset of hyperglycemia was 0.6 months (range: 0.1 to 20 months). Hyperglycemia led to discontinuation of PADCEV in 0.4% of patients. Closely monitor blood glucose levels in patients with, or at risk for, diabetes mellitus or hyperglycemia. If blood glucose is elevated (>250 mg/dL), withhold PADCEV.

Pneumonitis/Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD) Severe, life-threatening or fatal pneumonitis/ILD occurred in patients treated with PADCEV. In clinical trials of PADCEV as a single agent, 2.9% of the 753 patients treated with PADCEV had pneumonitis/ILD of any grade and 0.8% had Grade 3-4. The median time to onset of pneumonitis/ILD was 2.7 months (range: 0.6 to 6 months). The incidence of pneumonitis/ILD, including severe events occurred at a higher rate when PADCEV was given in combination with pembrolizumab. When PADCEV was given in combination with pembrolizumab, 9% of the 121 patients treated with combination therapy had pneumonitis/ILD of any grade and 3.3% had Grade 3. A fatal event of pneumonitis occurred in one patient (0.8%). The median time to onset of pneumonitis/ILD was 6 months (range: 0.6 to 26 months). Monitor patients for signs and symptoms indicative of pneumonitis/ILD such as hypoxia, cough, dyspnea or interstitial infiltrates on radiologic exams. Evaluate and exclude infectious, neoplastic and other causes for such signs and symptoms through appropriate investigations. Withhold PADCEV for patients who develop Grade 2 pneumonitis/ILD and consider dose reduction. Permanently discontinue PADCEV in all patients with Grade 3 or 4 pneumonitis/ILD.

Peripheral neuropathy (PN) Peripheral neuropathy occurred in 53% of the 753 patients treated with PADCEV as a single agent in clinical trials including 40% with sensory neuropathy, 7% with muscular weakness and 7% with motor neuropathy. Thirty percent of patients experienced Grade 2 reactions and 5% experienced Grade 3-4 reactions. Peripheral neuropathy occurred in patients treated with PADCEV with or without preexisting peripheral neuropathy. The median time to onset of Grade ≥2 peripheral neuropathy was 4.9 months (range: 0.1 to 20 months). Neuropathy led to treatment discontinuation in 7% of patients. Of the patients who experienced neuropathy who had data regarding resolution (N = 319), 14% had complete resolution, 46% had partial improvement, and 40% had no improvement at the time of their last evaluation. Of the 86% of patients with residual neuropathy at last evaluation, 51% had Grade 2 or greater neuropathy at the time of their last evaluation. The incidence of peripheral neuropathy occurred at a higher rate when PADCEV was given in combination with pembrolizumab. When PADCEV was given in combination with pembrolizumab, 65% of the 121 patients treated with combination therapy had peripheral neuropathy of any grade, 45% had Grade 2 neuropathy, and 3.3% had Grade 3 neuropathy. The median time to onset of Grade ≥2 peripheral neuropathy was 6 months (range: 0.3 to 25 months). Monitor patients for symptoms of new or worsening peripheral neuropathy and consider dose interruption or dose reduction of PADCEV when peripheral neuropathy occurs. Permanently discontinue PADCEV in patients who develop Grade ≥3 peripheral neuropathy.

Ocular disorders were reported in 40% of the 384 patients treated with PADCEV as a single agent in clinical trials in which ophthalmologic exams were scheduled. The majority of these events involved the cornea and included events associated with dry eye such as keratitis, blurred vision, increased lacrimation, conjunctivitis, limbal stem cell deficiency, and keratopathy. Dry eye symptoms occurred in 34% of patients, and blurred vision occurred in 13% of patients, during treatment with PADCEV. The median time to onset to symptomatic ocular disorder was 1.6 months (range: 0 to 19 months). Monitor patients for ocular disorders. Consider artificial tears for prophylaxis of dry eyes and ophthalmologic evaluation if ocular symptoms occur or do not resolve. Consider treatment with ophthalmic topical steroids, if indicated after an ophthalmic exam. Consider dose interruption or dose reduction of PADCEV for symptomatic ocular disorders.

Infusion site extravasation Skin and soft tissue reactions secondary to extravasation have been observed after administration of PADCEV. Of the 753 patients treated with PADCEV as a single agent in clinical trials, 1.5% of patients experienced skin and soft tissue reactions, including 0.3% who experienced Grade 3-4 reactions. Reactions may be delayed. Erythema, swelling, increased temperature, and pain worsened until 2-7 days after extravasation and resolved within 1-4 weeks of peak. Two patients (0.3%) developed extravasation reactions with secondary cellulitis, bullae, or exfoliation. Ensure adequate venous access prior to starting PADCEV and monitor for possible extravasation during administration. If extravasation occurs, stop the infusion and monitor for adverse reactions.

Embryo-fetal toxicity PADCEV can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Advise patients of the potential risk to the fetus. Advise female patients of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during PADCEV treatment and for 2 months after the last dose. Advise male patients with female partners of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with PADCEV and for 4 months after the last dose.

Adverse Reactions

Most common adverse reactions, including laboratory abnormalities (≥20%) (PADCEV monotherapy)

Rash, aspartate aminotransferase increased, glucose increased, creatinine increased, fatigue, peripheral neuropathy, lymphocytes decreased, alopecia, decreased appetite, hemoglobin decreased, diarrhea, sodium decreased, nausea, pruritus, phosphate decreased, dysgeusia, alanine aminotransferase increased, anemia, albumin decreased, neutrophils decreased, urate increased, lipase increased, platelets decreased, weight decreased and dry skin.

EV-301 Study: 296 patients previously treated with a PD-1/L1 inhibitor and platinum-based chemotherapy.

Serious adverse reactions occurred in 47% of patients treated with PADCEV; the most common (≥2%) were urinary tract infection, acute kidney injury (7% each) and pneumonia (5%). Fatal adverse reactions occurred in 3% of patients, including multiorgan dysfunction (1.0%), hepatic dysfunction, septic shock, hyperglycemia, pneumonitis and pelvic abscess (0.3% each). Adverse reactions leading to discontinuation occurred in 17% of patients; the most common (≥2%) were PN (5%) and rash (4%). Adverse reactions leading to dose interruption occurred in 61% of patients; the most common (≥4%) were PN (23%), rash (11%) and fatigue (9%). Adverse reactions leading to dose reduction occurred in 34% of patients; the most common (≥2%) were PN (10%), rash (8%), decreased appetite and fatigue (3% each). Clinically relevant adverse reactions (<15%) include vomiting (14%), AST increased (12%), hyperglycemia (10%), ALT increased (9%), pneumonitis (3%) and infusion site extravasation (0.7%).

EV-201, Cohort 2 Study: 89 patients previously treated with a PD-1/L1 inhibitor and not eligible for cisplatin-based chemotherapy.

Serious adverse reactions occurred in 39% of patients treated with PADCEV; the most common (≥3%) were pneumonia, sepsis and diarrhea (5% each). Fatal adverse reactions occurred in 8% of patients, including acute kidney injury (2.2%), metabolic acidosis, sepsis, multiorgan dysfunction, pneumonia and pneumonitis (1.1% each). Adverse reactions leading to discontinuation occurred in 20% of patients; the most common (≥2%) was PN (7%). Adverse reactions leading to dose interruption occurred in 60% of patients; the most common (≥3%) were PN (19%), rash (9%), fatigue (8%), diarrhea (5%), AST increased and hyperglycemia (3% each). Adverse reactions leading to dose reduction occurred in 49% of patients; the most common (≥3%) were PN (19%), rash (11%) and fatigue (7%). Clinically relevant adverse reactions (<15%) include vomiting (13%), AST increased (12%), lipase increased (11%), ALT increased (10%), pneumonitis (4%) and infusion site extravasation (1%).

EV-103 Study: 121 patients with previously untreated locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer who were not eligible for cisplatin-containing chemotherapy (PADCEV in combination with pembrolizumab)

The most common adverse reactions, including laboratory abnormalities (≥20%), of PADCEV in combination with pembrolizumab were glucose increased, aspartate aminotransferase increased, rash, hemoglobin decreased, creatinine increased, peripheral neuropathy, lymphocytes decreased, fatigue, alanine aminotransferase increased, sodium decreased, lipase increased, albumin decreased, alopecia, phosphate decreased, decreased weight, diarrhea, pruritus, decreased appetite, nausea, dysgeusia, potassium decreased, neutrophils decreased, urinary tract infection, constipation, potassium increased, calcium increased, peripheral edema, dry eye, dizziness, arthralgia, and dry skin.

Serious adverse reactions occurred in 50% of patients treated with PADCEV in combination with pembrolizumab. The most common serious adverse reactions (≥2%) were acute kidney injury (7%), urinary tract infection (7%), urosepsis (5%), sepsis (3.3%), pneumonia (3.3%), hematuria (3.3%), pneumonitis (3.3%), urinary retention (2.5%), diarrhea (2.5%), myasthenia gravis (2.5%), myositis (2.5%), anemia (2.5%), and hypotension (2.5%). Fatal adverse reactions occurred in 5% of patients treated with PADCEV in combination with pembrolizumab including sepsis (1.6%), bullous dermatitis (0.8%), myasthenia gravis (0.8%), and pneumonitis/ILD (0.8%). Adverse reactions leading to discontinuation of PADCEV occurred in 36% of patients. The most common adverse reactions (≥2%) leading to discontinuation of PADCEV were peripheral neuropathy (20%) and rash (6%). Adverse reactions leading to dose interruption of PADCEV occurred in 69% of patients. The most common adverse reactions (≥2%) leading to dose interruption of PADCEV were peripheral neuropathy (18%), rash (12%), lipase increased (6%), pneumonitis (6%), diarrhea (4.1%), acute kidney injury (3.3%), alanine aminotransferase increased (3.3%), fatigue (3.3%), neutropenia (3.3%), urinary tract infection (3.3%), amylase increased (2.5%), anemia (2.5%), COVID-19 (2.5%), hyperglycemia (2.5%), and hypotension (2.5%). Adverse reactions leading to dose reduction of PADCEV occurred in 45% of patients. The most common adverse reactions (≥2%) leading to dose reduction of PADCEV were peripheral neuropathy (17%), rash (12%), fatigue (5%), neutropenia (5%), and diarrhea (4.1%).

Drug Interactions

Effects of other drugs on PADCEV (Dual P-gp and Strong CYP3A4 Inhibitors)

Concomitant use with dual P-gp and strong CYP3A4 inhibitors may increase unconjugated monomethyl auristatin E exposure, which may increase the incidence or severity of PADCEV toxicities. Closely monitor patients for signs of toxicity when PADCEV is given concomitantly with dual P-gp and strong CYP3A4 inhibitors.

Specific Populations

Lactation Advise lactating women not to breastfeed during treatment with PADCEV and for at least 3 weeks after the last dose.

Hepatic impairment Avoid the use of PADCEV in patients with moderate or severe hepatic impairment.

For more information, please see the U.S. full Prescribing Information including BOXED WARNING for PADCEV here.

About TIVDAK (tisotumab vedotin-tftv) U.S. Indication and Important Safety Information

TIVDAK is indicated in the U.S. for the treatment of adult patients with recurrent or metastatic cervical cancer with disease progression on or after chemotherapy.

This indication is approved under accelerated approval based on tumor response rate and durability of response. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in confirmatory trials.

Important Safety Information

BOXED WARNING: OCULAR TOXICITY

TIVDAK caused changes in the corneal epithelium and conjunctiva resulting in changes in vision, including severe vision loss, and corneal ulceration. Conduct an ophthalmic exam at baseline, prior to each dose, and as clinically indicated. Adhere to premedication and required eye care before, during, and after infusion. Withhold TIVDAK until improvement and resume, reduce the dose, or permanently discontinue, based on severity.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Ocular adverse reactions occurred in 60% of patients with cervical cancer treated with TIVDAK across clinical trials. The most common were conjunctival adverse reactions (40%), dry eye (29%), corneal adverse reactions (21%), and blepharitis (8%). Grade 3 ocular adverse reactions occurred in 3.8% of patients, including severe ulcerative keratitis in 3.2% of patients. One patient experienced ulcerative keratitis with perforation requiring corneal transplantation. Cases of symblepharon were reported in patients with other tumor types treated with TIVDAK at the recommended dose.

In innovaTV 204, 4% of patients experienced visual acuity changes to 20/50 or worse including 1% of patients who experienced a visual acuity change to 20/200. Of the patients who experienced decreased visual acuity to 20/50 or worse, 75% resolved, including the patient who experienced decreased visual acuity to 20/200.

Refer patients to an eye care provider for an ophthalmic exam, including visual acuity and slit lamp exam, at baseline, prior to each dose, and as clinically indicated. Adhere to premedication and required eye care to reduce the risk of ocular adverse reactions. Promptly refer patients to an eye care provider for any new or worsening ocular signs and symptoms. Withhold dose, reduce the dose, or permanently discontinue TIVDAK based on the severity of the adverse reaction.

Peripheral Neuropathy (PN) occurred in 42% of cervical cancer patients treated with TIVDAK across clinical trials; 8% of patients experienced Grade 3 PN. PN adverse reactions included peripheral neuropathy (20%), peripheral sensory neuropathy (11%), peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy (5%), motor neuropathy (3%), muscular weakness (3%), and demyelinating peripheral polyneuropathy (1%). One patient with another tumor type treated with TIVDAK at the recommended dose developed Guillain-Barre syndrome.

Hemorrhage occurred in 62% of cervical cancer patients treated with TIVDAK across clinical trials. The most common all grade hemorrhage adverse reactions were epistaxis (44%), hematuria (10%), and vaginal hemorrhage (10%). Grade 3 hemorrhage occurred in 5% of patients.

Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of hemorrhage. For patients experiencing pulmonary or central nervous system (CNS) hemorrhage, permanently discontinue TIVDAK. For Grade ≥2 hemorrhage in any other location, withhold until bleeding has resolved, blood hemoglobin is stable, there is no bleeding diathesis that could increase the risk of continuing therapy, and there is no anatomical or pathologic condition that can increase the risk of hemorrhage recurrence. After resolution, either resume treatment or permanently discontinue TIVDAK.

Pneumonitis that is severe, life-threatening, or fatal can occur in patients treated with antibody-drug conjugates containing vedotin, including TIVDAK. Among patients with cervical cancer treated with TIVDAK across clinical trials, 2 patients (1.3%) experienced pneumonitis, including 1 patient who had a fatal outcome.

Monitor patients for pulmonary symptoms of pneumonitis. Symptoms may include hypoxia, cough, dyspnea or interstitial infiltrates on radiologic exams. Infectious, neoplastic, and other causes for symptoms should be excluded through appropriate investigations. Withhold TIVDAK for patients who develop persistent or recurrent Grade 2 pneumonitis and consider dose reduction. Permanently discontinue TIVDAK in all patients with Grade 3 or 4 pneumonitis.

Severe cutaneous adverse reactions, including events of fatal or life-threatening Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), can occur in patients treated with TIVDAK.

Monitor patients for signs or symptoms of severe cutaneous adverse reactions, which include target lesions, worsening skin reactions, blistering or peeling of the skin, painful sores in mouth, nose, throat, or genital area, fever or flu-like symptoms, and swollen lymph nodes. If signs or symptoms of severe cutaneous adverse reactions occur, withhold TIVDAK until the etiology of the reaction has been determined. Early consultation with a specialist is recommended to ensure greater diagnostic accuracy and appropriate management. Permanently discontinue TIVDAK for confirmed Grade 3 or 4 severe cutaneous adverse reactions, including SJS.

Embryo-fetal toxicity: TIVDAK can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Advise patients of the potential risk to a fetus. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with TIVDAK and for 2 months after the last dose. Advise male patients with female partners of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with TIVDAK and for 4 months after the last dose.

Adverse Reactions

Serious adverse reactions occurred in 43% of patients; the most common (≥3%) were ileus (6%), hemorrhage (5%), pneumonia (4%), PN, sepsis, constipation, and pyrexia (each 3%). Fatal adverse reactions occurred in 4% of patients who received TIVDAK, including septic shock, pneumonitis, sudden death, and multisystem organ failure (each 1%).

Adverse reactions leading to permanent discontinuation occurred in 13% of patients receiving TIVDAK; the most common (≥3%) were PN (5%) and corneal adverse reactions (4%). Adverse reactions leading to dose interruption occurred in 47% of patients; the most common (≥3%) were PN (8%), conjunctival adverse reactions (4%), and hemorrhage (4%). Adverse reactions leading to dose reduction occurred in 23% of patients; the most common (≥3%) were conjunctival adverse reactions (9%) and corneal adverse reactions (8%).

The most common (≥25%) adverse reactions, including laboratory abnormalities, were hemoglobin decreased (52%), fatigue (50%), lymphocytes decreased (42%), nausea (41%), PN (39%), alopecia (39%), epistaxis (39%), conjunctival adverse reactions (37%), hemorrhage (32%), leukocytes decreased (30%), creatinine increased (29%), dry eye (29%), prothrombin international normalized ratio increased (26%), activated partial thromboplastin time prolonged (26%), diarrhea (25%), and rash (25%).

Drug Interactions

Strong CYP3A4 inhibitors: Concomitant use with strong CYP3A4 inhibitors may increase unconjugated monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE) exposure, which may increase the risk of TIVDAK adverse reactions. Closely monitor patients for TIVDAK adverse reactions.

Use in Specific Populations

Moderate or severe hepatic impairment: MMAE exposure and adverse reactions are increased. Avoid use.

Lactation: Advise lactating women not to breastfeed during TIVDAK treatment and for at least 3 weeks after the last dose.

Please see full prescribing information, including BOXED WARNING for TIVDAK here.

About Seagen

Seagen Inc. is a global biotechnology company that discovers, develops and commercializes transformative cancer medicines to make a meaningful difference in people’s lives. Seagen is headquartered in the Seattle, Washington area, and has locations in California, Canada, Switzerland and the European Union. For more information on our marketed products and robust pipeline, visit www.seagen.com and follow @SeagenGlobal on Twitter.

Forward-Looking Statements

Certain statements made in this press release are forward looking, such as those, among others, relating to the therapeutic potential of PADCEV, TIVDAK, TUKYSA® (tucatinib), SGN-B7H4V and the company’s other products and product candidates, including their potential efficacy, safety and therapeutic uses, plans to discuss results from the EV-302 and innovaTV 301 trials with regulatory authorities; the potential for results from the EV-302 and innovaTV 301 trials to serve as confirmatory trials for the U.S. accelerated approvals of PADCEV and TIVDAK, respectively, or to support global regulatory applications; and Seagen’s pipeline. Actual results or developments may differ materially from those projected or implied in these forward-looking statements. Factors that may cause such a difference include, without limitation, the difficulty and uncertainty of pharmaceutical product development, including the risks that the company may experience delays in its clinical trials or otherwise experience failures or setbacks in its clinical development programs due to lack of efficacy, adverse events or other factors, and that adverse regulatory actions may occur. More information about the risks and uncertainties faced by Seagen is contained under the caption “Risk Factors” included in the company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended June 30, 2023, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Seagen disclaims any intention or obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by law.

1 PADCEV [package insert]. Northbrook, IL: Astellas Pharma US, Inc.

Contacts

For Media
David Caouette
(310) 430-3476
dcaouette@seagen.com

For Investors
Douglas Maffei, Ph.D.
(425) 527-4881
dmaffei@seagen.com

 
 

Source: Seagen Inc.

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