The American Diabetes Association Receives CDC Grant to Expand Diabetes Prevention Programming

The ADA's largest CDC grant will target the diabetes belt to prevent type 2 diabetes

ARLINGTON, Va., June 22, 2023 /PRNewswire/ -- Today, the American Diabetes Association® (ADA) announced that it has received a $12.5 million grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to build upon the CDC's National Diabetes Prevention Program (National DPP). The National DPP directly aligns with the ADA's mission to prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes.

The five-year grant will allow the ADA to reach thousands of people across multiple states within the diabetes belt aiming to decrease type 2 diabetes risk among adults with prediabetes while identifying and addressing social determinants of health (SDOH). The priority populations for the ADA's programming will be African/Black Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, and older Americans—all of whom experience disproportionately higher risk and burdens of diabetes.

"As the world's standard setter for diabetes prevention and care, we take our responsibility to bend the curve on diabetes seriously. Doing so requires innovative new approaches in diabetes prevention," said Charles "Chuck" Henderson, chief executive officer of the ADA. "This grant is the largest the CDC has ever provided the ADA and marks an important and exciting time for our organization. It gives us a chance to do what we do best on an even greater scale: Combining our clinical leadership with our commitment to caring for people in the communities where they live."

Recognizing that bending the curve on type 2 diabetes is a team approach, the ADA will partner with community health workers, pharmacists, payers, and community-based organizations to increase National DPP enrollment and engage with multiple payer partners to scale the program. The ADA and its partners will collaborate to increase National DPP enrollment, address SDOH, and apply innovative payment models to improve National DPP coverage.

"Over 37 million Americans have diabetes, and an astonishing 96 million have prediabetes—many of whom are unaware of it. It is urgent that all of us do more to address this situation. This tremendous partnership with the CDC enables us to fully leverage the ADA's existing diabetes prevention work, focusing on communities where the risk of diabetes and prediabetes are most prevalent," said Dr. Robert Gabbay, chief scientific and medical officer of the ADA and principal investigator for the grant. "We are particularly excited to take on this critical work in ways that fully engage other key stakeholders, including payers, community health workers, tech innovators, and most importantly, the patient community."

Visit diabetes.org to learn more about ADA's implementation of National DPP.

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About the American Diabetes Association

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) is the nation's leading voluntary health organization fighting to bend the curve on the diabetes epidemic and help people living with diabetes thrive. For 82 years, the ADA has driven discovery and research to treat, manage, and prevent diabetes while working relentlessly for a cure. Through advocacy, program development, and education we aim to improve the quality of life for the over 133 million Americans living with diabetes or prediabetes. Diabetes has brought us together. What we do next will make us Connected for Life®. To learn more or to get involved, visit us at diabetes.org or call 1-800-DIABETES (1-800-342-2383). Join the fight with us on Facebook (American Diabetes Association), Spanish Facebook (Asociación Americana de la Diabetes), LinkedIn (American Diabetes Association), Twitter (@AmDiabetesAssn), and Instagram (@AmDiabetesAssn).

Contact: Rebecca Fisher, 703-253-4918
press@diabetes.org

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SOURCE American Diabetes Association

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