Bristol Myers Squibb to Present Data at ASCO & EHA from More Than 130 Studies Across 25 Diseases Supporting Expansion into New Indications, Demonstrating Long-Term Survival, and Highlighting Novel Modalities and Research Platforms

PRINCETON, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- Bristol Myers Squibb (NYSE: BMY) today announced the presentation of data across its oncology and hematology portfolio at the upcoming 2024 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting and the European Hematology Association (EHA) 2024 Hybrid Congress. Data from more than 130 company-sponsored studies, investigator-sponsored studies, and collaborations showcase results spanning approximately 25 cancer types and serious blood disorders.

“At this year’s ASCO and EHA meetings, we have the opportunity to share data across our robust and differentiated oncology portfolio including new data from pivotal studies, data that reinforce the longer-term impact our medicines are having for patients, and emerging science in the oncology space,” said Samit Hirawat, M.D., executive vice president, chief medical officer, Drug Development, Bristol Myers Squibb. “We are focused on advancing critical research across immuno-oncology, targeted therapy, protein degradation, cell therapy, and radiopharmaceutical therapy, all with the goal of delivering potentially transformative treatment options that help provide long-term benefit for patients.”

Key data being presented by Bristol Myers Squibb at ASCO and EHA include:

New pivotal data

  • Progression-free survival and overall response rate data from the Phase 3 KRYSTAL-12 study evaluating KRAZATI® (adagrasib) as a monotherapy in patients with pretreated locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring a KRASG12C mutation. (ASCO)
  • First disclosure of results from the Phase 3 CheckMate -9DW trial demonstrating overall survival benefit with Opdivo® (nivolumab) plus Yervoy® (ipilimumab) vs. investigator’s choice of lenvatinib or sorafenib as a first-line treatment for patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). (ASCO)

Data strengthening the profile of our existing portfolio

  • Three-year follow-up data from the Phase 3 RELATIVITY-047 study demonstrating sustained responses with Opdualag™ (nivolumab and relatlimab-rmbw) in previously untreated metastatic or unresectable melanoma. (ASCO)
  • Five-year data from the Phase 3 CheckMate -9LA trial showing favorable clinical outcomes and durable survival benefit in patients with metastatic NSCLC treated with Opdivo plus Yervoy with chemotherapy vs. chemotherapy. (ASCO)
  • Four-year follow-up data from the Phase 3 CheckMate -816 trial reinforcing neoadjuvant Opdivo plus chemotherapy as a treatment in resectable NSCLC. (ASCO)
  • Exploratory analysis from the Phase 3 CheckMate -77T trial supporting the potential use of a perioperative Opdivo-based regimen as a treatment option for patients with resectable NSCLC, regardless of nodal status. (ASCO)
  • Multiple subgroup analyses from the Phase 1/2 TRANSCEND CLL 004, Phase 1 TRANSCEND NHL 001 (MCL cohort) and Phase 2 TRANSCEND FL studies reinforcing the deep and durable responses with Breyanzi® (lisocabtagene maraleucel), demonstrating consistent clinical outcomes in relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), relapsed/refractory mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and relapsed/refractory follicular lymphoma (FL) across a broad study population. (ASCO/EHA)

Emerging science

  • Efficacy and safety data from the Phase 2/3 RELATIVITY-048 trial evaluating the triplet combination of nivolumab, relatlimab, and ipilimumab in patients with advanced melanoma. (ASCO)
  • Safety and efficacy data from the Phase 1b portion of the ACTION-1 trial of RYZ101 (an alpha-emitting radiopharmaceutical in development for SSTR2+ solid tumors) in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NET) progressing after 177Lu somatostatin analogue (SSA) therapy. (ASCO)
  • First results from the Phase 1 study of GPRC5D-directed CAR T cell therapy (BMS-986393/CC-95266) showcasing promising preliminary efficacy and safety outcomes with a single infusion of BMS-986393 in patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma, including in patients with prior BCMA-directed therapy, who have received one to three prior regimens. (EHA)
  • New Phase 1/2 data from the targeted protein degradation platform including the novel oral CELMoD agents iberdomide in newly diagnosed multiple myeloma, mezigdomide in relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma, and golcadomide in first-line LBCL and relapsed/refractory FL, reinforcing promising activity. (ASCO/EHA)

Please see below for Important Safety Information and full Prescribing Information for Opdualag, Opdivo, Opdivo + Yervoy, Augtyro™ (repotrectinib), Reblozyl® (luspatercept-aamt) and KRAZATI.

Please see below for Important Safety Information and full Prescribing Information, including Boxed Warnings, for Abecma® (idecabtagene vicleucel), Breyanzi and Inrebic® (fedratinib).

Reblozyl is being developed and commercialized through a global collaboration with Merck following Merck’s acquisition of Acceleron Pharma, Inc. in November 2021.

Summary of Presentations:

Select Bristol Myers Squibb studies at the 2024 ASCO Annual Meeting include:

(all times in Central Time)

Abstract Title

Author

Presentation

Type/#

Session Title

Session

Date/Time

(CDT)

Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)

A post-hoc analysis of outcomes of patients with acute myeloid leukemia with myelodysplasia-related changes (AML-MRC) who received oral azacitidine (Oral-AZA) maintenance therapy in the QUAZAR AML-001 study.

Stéphane De Botton

Poster

Abstract #6522

Hematologic Malignancies— Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, and Allotransplant

Monday,

June 3, 2024

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Bladder Cancer

SOGUG-Vexillum: Phase II non-randomized clinical trial of nivolumab/ipilimumab maintenance following first-line chemotherapy in unresectable locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer.

Guillermo De Velasco

Poster

Abstract #4576

Genitourinary Cancer—Kidney and Bladder

Sunday,

June 2, 2024

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Characterization of complete responders to nivolumab + gemcitabine-cisplatin vs gemcitabine-cisplatin alone and patients with lymph node-only metastatic urothelial carcinoma from the CheckMate 901 trial.

Matthew D. Galsky

Oral

Abstract #4509

Genitourinary Cancer—Kidney and Bladder

Monday,

June 3, 2024

8:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Breast Cancer

Phase 2 study of novel HER2-targeting, TLR7/8 immune-stimulating antibody conjugate (ISAC) BDC-1001 (trastuzumab imbotolimod) +/- pertuzumab (P) in patients (pts) with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC) previously treated with trastuzumab deruxtecan (T-DXd).

Mark Pegram

Poster

Abstract #TPS1121

Breast Cancer—Metastatic

Sunday,

June 2, 2024

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

Evaluating CR as a surrogate endpoint for PFS in R/R chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL): A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCT).

Lin Wang

Poster

Abstract #7046

Hematologic Malignancies—Lymphoma and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

Monday,

June 3, 2024

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Association between treatment (tx) response and PFS and OS in R/R chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) or small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL): A 12-month landmark (LM) meta-analysis.

Xin Wang

Poster

Abstract #7047

Hematologic Malignancies—Lymphoma and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

Monday,

June 3, 2024

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Colorectal Cancer (CRC)

A phase 2 study evaluating response and biomarkers in patients with microsatellite stable (MSS) advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) treated with nivolumab/relatlimab.

Eric Christenson

Poster

Abstract #3554

Gastrointestinal Cancer—Colorectal and Anal

Saturday,

June 1, 2024

1:30 PM - 4:30 PM

Nivolumab (NIVO) plus ipilimumab (IPI) vs chemotherapy (chemo) as first-line (1L) treatment for microsatellite instability-high/mismatch repair-deficient (MSI-H/dMMR) metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC): Expanded efficacy analysis from CheckMate 8HW.

Heinz-Joseph Lenz

Oral

Abstract #3503

Gastrointestinal Cancer—Colorectal and Anal

Sunday,

June 2, 2024

8:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Esophageal Cancer (EC) and Gastrointestinal Cancers

Nivolumab (NIVO) plus chemotherapy (chemo) or ipilimumab (IPI) vs chemo as first-line (1L) treatment for advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC): 45-month (mo) follow-up from CheckMate 648.

Ian Chau

Poster

Abstract #4034

Gastrointestinal Cancer—Gastroesophageal, Pancreatic, and Hepatobiliary

Saturday,

June 1, 2024

1:30 PM - 4:30 PM

Nivolumab (NIVO) + chemotherapy (chemo) vs chemo as first-line (1L) treatment for advanced gastric cancer/gastroesophageal junction cancer/esophageal adenocarcinoma (GC/GEJC/EAC): 4-year follow-up of CheckMate 649.

Elena Elimova

Poster

Abstract #4040

Gastrointestinal Cancer—Gastroesophageal, Pancreatic, and Hepatobiliary

Saturday,

June 1, 2024

1:30 PM - 4:30 PM

Updated quality-adjusted time without symptoms or toxicity (Q-TWiST) analysis of nivolumab plus chemotherapy versus chemotherapy alone as first-line (1L) treatment for advanced gastric cancer, gastroesophageal junction cancer, or esophageal adenocarcinoma (GC/GEJC/EAC): 4-year (yr) follow-up from CheckMate 649 (CM 649).

Daniel Lin

Poster

Abstract #4044

Gastrointestinal Cancer—Gastroesophageal, Pancreatic, and Hepatobiliary

Saturday,

June 1, 2024

1:30 PM - 4:30 PM

A phase II/III study of peri-operative nivolumab (nivo) and ipilimumab (ipi) in patients (pts) with locoregional esophageal (E) and gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma: Results of the neoadjuvant pathologic complete response (pCR) rate (ECOG-ACRIN EA2174).

Jennifer Rachel Eads

Oral

Abstract #4000

Gastrointestinal Cancer—Gastroesophageal, Pancreatic, and Hepatobiliary

Tuesday,

June 4, 2024

9:45 AM - 12:45 PM

Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC)

Nivolumab (NIVO) plus ipilimumab (IPI) vs lenvatinib (LEN) or sorafenib (SOR) as first-line treatment for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (uHCC): First results from CheckMate 9DW.

Peter Robert Galle

Oral

Abstract #LBA4008

Gastrointestinal Cancer—Gastroesophageal, Pancreatic, and Hepatobiliary

Tuesday,

June 4, 2024

9:45 AM - 12:45 PM

Melanoma

Efficacy and safety of triplet nivolumab, relatlimab, and ipilimumab (NIVO + RELA + IPI) in advanced melanoma: Results from RELATIVITY-048.

Paolo Antonio Ascierto

Oral

Abstract #9504

Melanoma/Skin Cancers

Friday,

May 31, 2024

2:45 PM - 5:45 PM

Nivolumab (NIVO) plus relatlimab (RELA) vs NIVO in previously untreated metastatic or unresectable melanoma (RELATIVITY-047): Overall survival (OS) and melanoma-specific survival (MSS) outcomes at 3 years.

Hussein A. Tawbi

Poster

Abstract #9524

Melanoma/Skin Cancers

Saturday,

June 1, 2024

1:30 PM - 4:30 PM

Efficacy and safety of first-line (1L) nivolumab plus relatlimab (NIVO + RELA) versus NIVO plus ipilimumab (NIVO + IPI) in advanced melanoma: An updated indirect treatment comparison (ITC).

Dirk Schadendorf

Poster

Abstract #9557

Melanoma/Skin Cancers

Saturday,

June 1, 2024

1:30 PM - 4:30 PM

First-line treatment preferences for advanced melanoma among oncologists and patients in the US: A discrete choice experiment.

Michael A. Postow

Poster

Abstract #9539

Melanoma/Skin Cancers

Saturday,

June 1, 2024

1:30 PM - 4:30 PM

A phase 2, open-label, 2-cohort study to evaluate patient preference for nivolumab (NIVO) + relatlimab (RELA) fixed-dose combination (FDC) subcutaneous (SC) vs NIVO + RELA FDC intravenous (IV) and NIVO SC vs NIVO IV in participants with melanoma.

Steven Y. Liu

Poster

Abstract #TPS9619

Melanoma/Skin Cancers

Saturday,

June 1, 2024

1:30 PM - 4:30 PM

Multiple Myeloma (MM)

Association of patient (pt) factors and pharmacodynamic biomarkers with progression-free survival (PFS) after idecabtagene vicleucel (ide-cel) in pts from KarMMa-3.

Bertrand Arnulf

Poster

Abstract #7527

Hematologic Malignancies—Plasma Cell Dyscrasia

Monday,

June 3, 2024

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Impact of renal impairment (RI) on pharmacokinetics (PK) and clinical outcomes with mezigdomide plus dexamethasone (DEX) in relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM).

Suzanne Trudel

Poster

Abstract #7539

Hematologic Malignancies—Plasma Cell Dyscrasia

Monday,

June 3, 2024

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Validation of prototype biomarkers to identify risk factors of inflammatory adverse events (iAEs) following idecabtagene vicleucel (ide-cel) infusion in patients with relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM) in KarMMa-3.

Clara Amorosi

Poster

Abstract #7529

Hematologic Malignancies—Plasma Cell Dyscrasia

Monday,

June 3, 2024

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS)

Preliminary safety and efficacy of oral azacitidine (Oral-AZA) in patients (pts) with low-/Intermediate (Int)-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS): Phase 2 results from the ASTREON trial.

Guillermo Garcia-Manero

Rapid Oral

Abstract #6509

Hematologic Malignancies—Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, and Allotransplant

Saturday,

June 1, 2024

8:00 AM - 9:30 AM

Clinical benefit of luspatercept treatment (tx) in transfusion-dependent (TD), erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA)-naive patients (pts) with very low-, low- or intermediate-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) in the COMMANDS trial.

Amer Methqal Zeidan

Poster

Abstract #6565

Hematologic Malignancies—Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, and Allotransplant

Monday,

June 3, 2024

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (includes DLBCL, LBCL, FL, MCL, etc.)

Lisocabtagene maraleucel (liso-cel) in patients (pt) with R/R mantle cell lymphoma (MCL): Subgroup analyses by number of prior systemic lines of therapy (LOT) and by response to prior Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor (BTKi) from the TRANSCEND NHL 001 MCL cohort (TRANSCEND-MCL).

M. Lia Palomba

Rapid Oral

Abstract

#7016

Hematologic Malignancies—Lymphoma and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

Sunday,

June 2, 2024

4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

Lisocabtagene maraleucel (liso-cel) vs standard of care (SOC) with salvage chemotherapy (CT) followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) as second-line (2L) treatment in patients (pt) with R/R large B-cell lymphoma (LBCL): 3-year follow-up (FU) from the randomized, phase 3 TRANSFORM study.

Manali Kirtikumar Kamdar

Rapid Oral

Abstract #7013

Hematologic Malignancies—Lymphoma and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

Sunday,

June 2, 2024

4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

Real-world outcomes of lisocabtagene maraleucel (liso-cel) in patients (pt) with Richter transformation (RT) from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR).

Allison Marie Winter

Rapid Oral

Abstract #7010

Hematologic Malignancies—Lymphoma and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

Sunday,

June 2, 2024

4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

Impact of clinical response and AEs on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients (pts) with R/R large B-cell lymphoma (LBCL): Pooled data from 4 lisocabtagene maraleucel (liso-cel) trials.

Patrick Connor Johnson

Poster

Abstract #11105

Quality Care/Health Services Research

Monday,

June 3, 2024

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Estimating the health care costs associated with receipt of lisocabtagene maraleucel: Insights from adults with mantle cell lymphoma (TRANSCEND NHL 001).

Tycel Jovelle Phillips

Poster

Abstract #7028

Hematologic Malignancies—Lymphoma and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

Monday,

June 3, 2024

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Impact of bridging therapy (BT) on lisocabtagene maraleucel (liso-cel) treatment in patients (pt) with R/R follicular lymphoma (FL).

M. Lia Palomba

Poster

Abstract #7068

Hematologic Malignancies—Lymphoma and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

Monday,

June 3, 2024

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Patients (pts) with R/R large B-cell lymphoma (LBCL) treated with lisocabtagene maraleucel (liso-cel) nonconforming product (NCP) under the Expanded Access Protocol (EAP).

Mecide Meric Gharibo

Poster

Abstract #7026

Hematologic Malignancies—

Lymphoma and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

Monday,

June 3, 2024

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

KRYSTAL-12: Phase 3 Study of Adagrasib versus Docetaxel in Patients with Previously Treated Advanced/Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Harboring a KRASG12C Mutation.

Tony Mok

Oral

Abstract #LBA8509

Clinical Science Symposium—Targeting KRAS in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Saturday,

June 1, 2024

1:15 PM - 2:45 PM

Neoadjuvant nivolumab (NIVO) + chemotherapy (chemo) vs chemo in patients (pts) with resectable NSCLC: 4-year update from CheckMate 816.

Jonathan Spicer

Rapid Oral

Abstract #LBA8010

Lung Cancer—Non-Small Cell Local-Regional/Small Cell/Other Thoracic Cancers

Sunday,

June 2, 2024

4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

Clinical outcomes with perioperative nivolumab (NIVO) by nodal status among patients (pts) with stage III resectable NSCLC: Results from the phase 3 CheckMate 77T study.

Tina Cascone

Oral

Abstract #LBA8007

Lung Cancer—Non-Small Cell Local-Regional/Small Cell/Other Thoracic Cancers

Monday,

June 3, 2024

8:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Correlation of the combination of CT-derived tumor texture and vessel tortuosity on survival outcomes for immunotherapy but not for chemotherapy in metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (mNSCLC): Results from a CheckMate227 (CM227) subset.

Pushkar Mutha

Poster

Abstract #8610

Lung cancer—Non-Small Cell Metastatic

Monday,

June 3, 2024

1:30 PM - 4:30 PM

Five-year outcomes with first-line (1L) nivolumab + ipilimumab + chemotherapy (N + I + C) vs C in patients (pts) with metastatic NSCLC (mNSCLC) in CheckMate 9LA.

Martin Reck

Poster

Abstract #8560

Lung cancer—Non-Small Cell Metastatic

Monday,

June 3, 2024

1:30 PM - 4:30 PM

Repotrectinib in tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)-naïve patients (pts) with advanced ROS1 fusion-positive (ROS1+) NSCLC in the phase 1/2 TRIDENT-1 trial: Clinical update, treatment beyond progression and subsequent therapies.

Alexander Drilon

Poster

Abstract #8522

Lung cancer—Non-Small Cell Metastatic

Monday,

June 3, 2024

1:30 PM - 4:30 PM

Pancreatic Cancer

Phase Ib portion of the ACTION-1 phase Ib/3 trial of RYZ101 in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NET) progressing after 177Lu somatostatin analogue (SSA) therapy: Safety and efficacy findings.

Daniel Halperin

Poster

Abstract #3091

Developmental Therapeutics—Molecularly Targeted Agents and Tumor Biology

Saturday,

June 1, 2024

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC)

Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) with nivolumab (NIVO) subcutaneous (SC) or intravenous (IV) in patients (pts) with advanced or metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) who have received prior therapy in the phase 3 CheckMate 67T trial.

Saby George

Poster

Abstract #4535

Genitourinary Cancer—Kidney and Bladder

Sunday,

June 2, 2024

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Subcutaneous (SC) nivolumab (NIVO) vs intravenous (IV) NIVO in patients with previously treated advanced or metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC): Safety and patient-reported outcomes (PROs) of the randomized phase 3 CheckMate 67T trial.

Maria T. Bourlon

Poster

Abstract #4532

Genitourinary Cancer—Kidney and Bladder

Sunday,

June 2, 2024

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Intratumoral T-cell infiltration and response to nivolumab plus ipilimumab in patients with metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma from the CheckMate-214 trial.

Sayed Matar

Poster

Abstract #4536

Genitourinary Cancer— Kidney and Bladder

Sunday,

June 2, 2024

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Partitioned overall survival: Comprehensive analysis of survival states over 4 years in CheckMate 9ER comparing first-line nivolumab plus cabozantinib versus sunitinib in advanced renal cell carcinoma (aRCC).

Charlene Mantia

Oral

Abstract #4507

Genitourinary Cancer—Kidney and Bladder

Monday,

June 3, 2024

8:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Brain Cancer

Phase II study of enasidenib in IDH2-mutated malignant sinonasal and skull base tumors.

Elisabetta Xue

Poster

#TPS3183

Developmental Therapeutics—Molecularly Targeted Agents and Tumor Biology

Saturday,

June 1, 2024

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

All abstracts, except late-breaking abstracts, are available on the ASCO website as of 5:00 PM EDT on Thursday, May 23. All late-breaking abstracts will be available on the ASCO website at 8:00 AM EDT on the day of the scientific session for the abstract presentation.

Select Bristol Myers Squibb studies at the 2024 EHA Congress include:

(all times in Eastern Daylight and Central European Time)

Abstract Title

Author

Presentation

Type

Session Date/Time

(EDT/CET)

Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)

A post hoc analysis of outcomes of patients with acute myeloid leukemia with myelodysplasia-related changes who received oral azacitidine maintenance therapy in the QUAZAR AML-001 study.

Maria Teresa Voso

Oral

Abstract #S141

Saturday, June 15, 2024

11:30 AM - 12:45 PM (16:30 - 17:45 CET)

Impact of TP53 mutations in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) during oral azacitidine maintenance therapy: Outcomes from the QUAZAR AML-001 trial.

Andrew H. Wei

Poster

Abstract #P560

Friday, June 14, 2024

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM (18:00 - 19:00 CET)

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

Characteristics associated with response to lisocabtagene maraleucel (liso-cel) in patients (PTS) with R/R CLL/SLL: Exploratory analyses from TRANSCEND CLL 004.

William G. Wierda

Oral

Abstract #S158

Sunday, June 16, 2024

6:30 AM - 7:45 AM (11:30 - 12:45 CET)

Multiple Myeloma (MM)

Disease characteristics and survival outcomes in patients with relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma by extramedullary disease status: findings from the Connect® MM disease registry.

Hans Lee

Poster

Abstract #P930

Friday, June 14, 2024

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM (18:00 - 19:00 CET)

Safety and preliminary efficacy of BMS-986393, a GPRC5D CAR T cell therapy, in patients with relapsed/refractory (RR) multiple myeloma (MM) and 1-3 prior regimens: First results from a phase 1 study.

Omar Nadeem

Poster

Abstract #P951

Friday, June 14, 2024

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM (18:00 - 19:00 CET)

Idecabtagene vicleucel (ide-cel) in patients (pts) with clinical high-risk early relapse multiple myeloma (MM) without front-line (1L) autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT): KarMMa-2 cohort 2b.

Xavier Leleu

Oral

Abstract #S208

Saturday, June 15, 2024

11:30 PM - 12:45 PM (16:30 - 17:45 CET)

Association of patient factors and pharmacodynamic biomarkers with progression-free survival after idecabtagene vicleucel in patients from KarMMa-3.

Bertrand Arnulf

Poster
Abstract #P876

Friday, June 14, 2024

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM (18:00 - 19:00 CET)

Iberdomide is immune stimulatory and induces deep anti-myeloma activity across doses in combination with daratumumab in patients with TNE NDMM from the CC-220-MM-001 study.

Michael Amatangelo

Poster

Abstract #P847

Friday, June 14, 2024

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM (18:00 - 19:00 CET)

Mezigdomide (mezi), tazemetostat (taz), and dexamethasone (dex) in patients (PTS) with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM): Preliminary results from the CA057-003 trial.

Luciano Costa

Poster

Abstract #P903

Friday, June 14, 2024

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM (18:00 - 19:00 CET)

Improved disease status pre-infusion leads to better outcomes with standard of care idecabtagene vicleucel (ide-cel) in patients with relapsed refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM).

Aimaz Afrough

Poster

Abstract #P939

Friday, June 14, 2024

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM (18:00 - 19:00 CET)

Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS)

Real-world dose escalation and outcomes among patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes receiving luspatercept in clinical practice.

Kashyap Patel

Poster

Abstract #P768

Friday, June 14, 2024

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM (18:00 - 19:00 CET)

Quantifying the relationship between transfusion independence and overall survival in lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes.

Luca Malcovati

Poster

Abstract #P782

Friday, June 14, 2024

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM (18:00 - 19:00 CET)

Value of early luspatercept use in lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (LR-MDS).

David Valcárcel

Poster

Abstract #P789

Friday, June 14, 2024

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM (18:00 - 19:00 CET)

Relationship between haemoglobin and quality of life in transfusion-dependent patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndrome receiving luspatercept or epoetin alfa.

Esther Oliva

Poster

Abstract #P774

Friday, June 14, 2024

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM (18:00 - 19:00 CET)

Luspatercept improves hematopoiesis in lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS): Comparative biomarker analysis of ring sideroblast-positive and -negative subgroups from the phase 3 COMMANDS study.

Sheida Hayati

Poster

Abstract #P763

Friday, June 14, 2024

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM (18:00 - 19:00 CET)

Clinical benefit of luspatercept in transfusion-dependent, erythropoiesis-stimulating agent-naive patients with very low-, low- or intermediate-risk myelodysplastic syndromes in the COMMANDS trial.

Valeria Santini

Poster

Abstract #P785

Friday, June 14, 2024

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM (18:00 - 19:00 CET)

Multilineage and safety results from the COMMANDS trial in transfusion-dependent, erythropoiesis-stimulating agent-naive patients with very low-, low- or intermediate-risk myelodysplastic syndromes.

Guillermo Garcia-Manero

Poster

Abstract #P780

Friday, June 14, 2024

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM (18:00 - 19:00 CET)

Comparative analysis of clinical benefit by genomic landscape and mutational burden of luspatercept versus epoetin alfa in lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) in the Phase 3 COMMANDS study.

Rami S Komrokji

Poster

Abstract #P749

Friday, June 14, 2024

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM (18:00 - 19:00 CET)

Myelofibrosis

Patient characteristics, treatment patterns, and health outcomes in a real-world population of patients with myelofibrosis treated with fedratinib.

Francesco Passamonti

Poster

Abstract #P1034

Friday, June 14, 2024

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM (18:00 - 19:00 CET)

Fedratinib inhibits immune evasion and restores B cell maturation: Biomarker analysis from the FREEDOM2 study.

Claire Harrison

Poster

Abstract #P1020

Friday, June 14, 2024

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM (18:00 - 19:00 CET)

Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (includes DLBCL, LBCL, FL, MCL, etc.)

Safety and efficacy of golcadomide, a potential first-in-class CELMOD agent ± rituximab in a phase 1/2 open-label study of patients with relapsed/refractory (r/r) follicular lymphoma (FL).

Julio Chavez

Poster

Abstract #P1132

Friday, June 14, 2024

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM (18:00 - 19:00 CET)

Golcadomide (Golca [CC-99282]), a novel CELMoD agent, plus R-CHOP in patients (pts) with untreated aggressive B-cell lymphoma (A-BCL): Updated safety and 12-month efficacy results.

Marc Hoffmann

Oral

Abstract #S235

Friday, June 14, 2024

9:45 AM - 11:00 AM (14:45 - 16:00 CET)

Lisocabtagene maraleucel versus standard of care with salvage chemotherapy followed by ASCT as second-line treatment in patients with R/R large b-cell lymphoma: 3-year follow up of TRANSFORM.

Jeremy Abramson

Oral

Abstract #S272

Sunday, June 16, 2024

6:30 AM - 7:45 AM (11:30 - 12:45 CET)

Subgroup analyses in patients with R/R MCL treated with lisocabtagene maraleucel by prior lines of therapy and response to bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor from the TRANSCEND NHL 001 MCL cohort.

Manali Kamdar

Poster

Abstract #P1126

Friday, June 14, 2024

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM (18:00 - 19:00 CET)

Thalassemia (Alpha or Beta)

Safety data from the dose-finding cohorts: a phase 2A study of luspatercept in pediatric patients with βeta-thalassemia.

Antonis Kattamis

Poster

Abstract #P1516

Friday, June 14, 2024

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM (18:00 - 19:00 CET)

Characterizing patterns of transfusion burden (TB) reduction in patients (pts) with transfusion-dependent (TD) βeta-thalassemia treated with luspatercept in the BELIEVE trial.

Kevin Kuo

Poster

Abstract #P1522

Friday, June 14, 2024

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM (18:00 - 19:00 CET)

All EHA abstracts, except late-breaking abstracts, will be available at 10:00 AM EDT on May 14. All late-breaking abstracts will be available at 10:00 AM EDT on June 3.

Bristol Myers Squibb: Creating a Better Future for People with Cancer

Bristol Myers Squibb is inspired by a single vision — transforming patients’ lives through science. The goal of the company’s cancer research is to deliver medicines that offer each patient a better, healthier life and to make cure a possibility. Building on a legacy across a broad range of cancers that have changed survival expectations for many, Bristol Myers Squibb researchers are exploring new frontiers in personalized medicine and, through innovative digital platforms, are turning data into insights that sharpen their focus. Deep understanding of causal human biology, cutting-edge capabilities and differentiated research platforms uniquely position the company to approach cancer from every angle.

Cancer can have a relentless grasp on many parts of a patient’s life, and Bristol Myers Squibb is committed to taking actions to address all aspects of care, from diagnosis to survivorship. As a leader in cancer care, Bristol Myers Squibb is working to empower all people with cancer to have a better future.

OPDIVO

INDICATIONS

OPDIVO® (nivolumab), as a single agent, is indicated for the treatment of adult and pediatric patients 12 years and older with unresectable or metastatic melanoma.

OPDIVO® (nivolumab), in combination with YERVOY® (ipilimumab), is indicated for the treatment of adult and pediatric patients 12 years and older with unresectable or metastatic melanoma.

OPDIVO® is indicated for the adjuvant treatment of adult and pediatric patients 12 years and older with completely resected Stage IIB, Stage IIC, Stage III, or Stage IV melanoma.

OPDIVO® (nivolumab), in combination with platinum-doublet chemotherapy, is indicated as neoadjuvant treatment of adult patients with resectable (tumors ≥4 cm or node positive) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

OPDIVO® (nivolumab), in combination with YERVOY® (ipilimumab), is indicated for the first-line treatment of adult patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose tumors express PD-L1 (≥1%) as determined by an FDA-approved test, with no EGFR or ALK genomic tumor aberrations.

OPDIVO® (nivolumab), in combination with YERVOY® (ipilimumab) and 2 cycles of platinum-doublet chemotherapy, is indicated for the first-line treatment of adult patients with metastatic or recurrent non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), with no EGFR or ALK genomic tumor aberrations.

OPDIVO® (nivolumab) is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with progression on or after platinum-based chemotherapy. Patients with EGFR or ALK genomic tumor aberrations should have disease progression on FDA-approved therapy for these aberrations prior to receiving OPDIVO.

OPDIVO® (nivolumab), in combination with YERVOY® (ipilimumab), is indicated for the first-line treatment of adult patients with unresectable malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM).

OPDIVO® (nivolumab), in combination with YERVOY® (ipilimumab), is indicated for the first-line treatment of adult patients with intermediate or poor risk advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC).

OPDIVO® (nivolumab), in combination with cabozantinib, is indicated for the first-line treatment of adult patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC).

OPDIVO® (nivolumab) is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) who have received prior anti-angiogenic therapy.

OPDIVO® (nivolumab) is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) that has relapsed or progressed after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and brentuximab vedotin or after 3 or more lines of systemic therapy that includes autologous HSCT. This indication is approved under accelerated approval based on overall response rate. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in confirmatory trials.

OPDIVO® (nivolumab) is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with recurrent or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) with disease progression on or after platinum-based therapy.

OPDIVO® (nivolumab) is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial carcinoma who have disease progression during or following platinum-containing chemotherapy or have disease progression within 12 months of neoadjuvant or adjuvant treatment with platinum-containing chemotherapy.

OPDIVO® (nivolumab), as a single agent, is indicated for the adjuvant treatment of adult patients with urothelial carcinoma (UC) who are at high risk of recurrence after undergoing radical resection of UC.

OPDIVO® (nivolumab), in combination with cisplatin and gemcitabine, is indicated as first-line treatment for adult patients with unresectable or metastatic urothelial carcinoma.

OPDIVO® (nivolumab), as a single agent, is indicated for the treatment of adult and pediatric (12 years and older) patients with microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H) or mismatch repair deficient (dMMR) metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) that has progressed following treatment with a fluoropyrimidine, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan. This indication is approved under accelerated approval based on overall response rate and duration of response. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in confirmatory trials.

OPDIVO® (nivolumab), in combination with YERVOY® (ipilimumab), is indicated for the treatment of adults and pediatric patients 12 years and older with microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H) or mismatch repair deficient (dMMR) metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) that has progressed following treatment with a fluoropyrimidine, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan. This indication is approved under accelerated approval based on overall response rate and duration of response. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in confirmatory trials.

OPDIVO® (nivolumab), in combination with YERVOY® (ipilimumab), is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who have been previously treated with sorafenib. This indication is approved under accelerated approval based on overall response rate and duration of response. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in the confirmatory trials.

OPDIVO® (nivolumab) is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with unresectable advanced, recurrent or metastatic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) after prior fluoropyrimidine- and platinum-based chemotherapy.

OPDIVO® (nivolumab) is indicated for the adjuvant treatment of completely resected esophageal or gastroesophageal junction cancer with residual pathologic disease in adult patients who have received neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT).

OPDIVO® (nivolumab), in combination with fluoropyrimidine- and platinum-containing chemotherapy, is indicated for the first-line treatment of adult patients with unresectable advanced or metastatic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC).

OPDIVO® (nivolumab), in combination with YERVOY® (ipilimumab), is indicated for the first-line treatment of adult patients with unresectable advanced or metastatic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC).

OPDIVO® (nivolumab), in combination with fluoropyrimidine- and platinum- containing chemotherapy, is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with advanced or metastatic gastric cancer, gastroesophageal junction cancer, and esophageal adenocarcinoma.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Severe and Fatal Immune-Mediated Adverse Reactions

Immune-mediated adverse reactions listed herein may not include all possible severe and fatal immune- mediated adverse reactions.

Immune-mediated adverse reactions, which may be severe or fatal, can occur in any organ system or tissue. While immune-mediated adverse reactions usually manifest during treatment, they can also occur after discontinuation of OPDIVO or YERVOY. Early identification and management are essential to ensure safe use of OPDIVO and YERVOY. Monitor for signs and symptoms that may be clinical manifestations of underlying immune-mediated adverse reactions. Evaluate clinical chemistries including liver enzymes, creatinine, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) level, and thyroid function at baseline and periodically during treatment with OPDIVO and before each dose of YERVOY. In cases of suspected immune-mediated adverse reactions, initiate appropriate workup to exclude alternative etiologies, including infection. Institute medical management promptly, including specialty consultation as appropriate.

Withhold or permanently discontinue OPDIVO and YERVOY depending on severity (please see section 2 Dosage and Administration in the accompanying Full Prescribing Information). In general, if OPDIVO or YERVOY interruption or discontinuation is required, administer systemic corticosteroid therapy (1 to 2 mg/kg/day prednisone or equivalent) until improvement to Grade 1 or less. Upon improvement to Grade 1 or less, initiate corticosteroid taper and continue to taper over at least 1 month. Consider administration of other systemic immunosuppressants in patients whose immune-mediated adverse reactions are not controlled with corticosteroid therapy. Toxicity management guidelines for adverse reactions that do not necessarily require systemic steroids (e.g., endocrinopathies and dermatologic reactions) are discussed below.

Immune-Mediated Pneumonitis

OPDIVO and YERVOY can cause immune-mediated pneumonitis. The incidence of pneumonitis is higher in patients who have received prior thoracic radiation. In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, immune- mediated pneumonitis occurred in 3.1% (61/1994) of patients, including Grade 4 (<0.1%), Grade 3 (0.9%), and Grade 2 (2.1%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 1 mg/kg with YERVOY 3 mg/kg every 3 weeks, immune- mediated pneumonitis occurred in 7% (31/456) of patients, including Grade 4 (0.2%), Grade 3 (2.0%), and Grade 2 (4.4%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks, immune- mediated pneumonitis occurred in 3.9% (26/666) of patients, including Grade 3 (1.4%) and Grade 2 (2.6%). In NSCLC patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg every 2 weeks with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 6 weeks, immune- mediated pneumonitis occurred in 9% (50/576) of patients, including Grade 4 (0.5%), Grade 3 (3.5%), and Grade 2 (4.0%). Four patients (0.7%) died due to pneumonitis.

In Checkmate 205 and 039, pneumonitis, including interstitial lung disease, occurred in 6.0% (16/266) of patients receiving OPDIVO. Immune-mediated pneumonitis occurred in 4.9% (13/266) of patients receiving OPDIVO, including Grade 3 (n=1) and Grade 2 (n=12).

Immune-Mediated Colitis

OPDIVO and YERVOY can cause immune-mediated colitis, which may be fatal. A common symptom included in the definition of colitis was diarrhea. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection/reactivation has been reported in patients with corticosteroid-refractory immune-mediated colitis. In cases of corticosteroid-refractory colitis, consider repeating infectious workup to exclude alternative etiologies. In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, immune-mediated colitis occurred in 2.9% (58/1994) of patients, including Grade 3 (1.7%) and Grade 2 (1%).

In patients receiving OPDIVO 1 mg/kg with YERVOY 3 mg/kg every 3 weeks, immune-mediated colitis occurred in 25% (115/456) of patients, including Grade 4 (0.4%), Grade 3 (14%) and Grade 2 (8%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks, immune-mediated colitis occurred in 9% (60/666) of patients, including Grade 3 (4.4%) and Grade 2 (3.7%).

Immune-Mediated Hepatitis and Hepatotoxicity

OPDIVO and YERVOY can cause immune-mediated hepatitis. In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, immune-mediated hepatitis occurred in 1.8% (35/1994) of patients, including Grade 4 (0.2%), Grade 3 (1.3%), and Grade 2 (0.4%).

In patients receiving OPDIVO 1 mg/kg with YERVOY 3 mg/kg every 3 weeks, immune-mediated hepatitis occurred in 15% (70/456) of patients, including Grade 4 (2.4%), Grade 3 (11%), and Grade 2 (1.8%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks, immune-mediated hepatitis occurred in 7% (48/666) of patients, including Grade 4 (1.2%), Grade 3 (4.9%), and Grade 2 (0.4%).

OPDIVO in combination with cabozantinib can cause hepatic toxicity with higher frequencies of Grade 3 and 4 ALT and AST elevations compared to OPDIVO alone. Consider more frequent monitoring of liver enzymes as compared to when the drugs are administered as single agents. In patients receiving OPDIVO and cabozantinib, Grades 3 and 4 increased ALT or AST were seen in 11% of patients.

Immune-Mediated Endocrinopathies

OPDIVO and YERVOY can cause primary or secondary adrenal insufficiency, immune-mediated hypophysitis, immune-mediated thyroid disorders, and Type 1 diabetes mellitus, which can present with diabetic ketoacidosis. Withhold OPDIVO and YERVOY depending on severity (please see section 2 Dosage and Administration in the accompanying Full Prescribing Information). For Grade 2 or higher adrenal insufficiency, initiate symptomatic treatment, including hormone replacement as clinically indicated. Hypophysitis can present with acute symptoms associated with mass effect such as headache, photophobia, or visual field defects. Hypophysitis can cause hypopituitarism; initiate hormone replacement as clinically indicated. Thyroiditis can present with or without endocrinopathy. Hypothyroidism can follow hyperthyroidism; initiate hormone replacement or medical management as clinically indicated. Monitor patients for hyperglycemia or other signs and symptoms of diabetes; initiate treatment with insulin as clinically indicated.

In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, adrenal insufficiency occurred in 1% (20/1994), including Grade 3 (0.4%) and Grade 2 (0.6%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 1 mg/kg with YERVOY 3 mg/kg every 3 weeks, adrenal insufficiency occurred in 8% (35/456), including Grade 4 (0.2%), Grade 3 (2.4%), and Grade 2 (4.2%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks, adrenal insufficiency occurred in 7% (48/666) of patients, including Grade 4 (0.3%), Grade 3 (2.5%), and Grade 2 (4.1%). In patients receiving OPDIVO and cabozantinib, adrenal insufficiency occurred in 4.7% (15/320) of patients, including Grade 3 (2.2%) and Grade 2 (1.9%).

In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, hypophysitis occurred in 0.6% (12/1994) of patients, including Grade 3 (0.2%) and Grade 2 (0.3%).

In patients receiving OPDIVO 1 mg/kg with YERVOY 3 mg/kg every 3 weeks, hypophysitis occurred in 9% (42/456), including Grade 3 (2.4%) and Grade 2 (6%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks, hypophysitis occurred in 4.4% (29/666) of patients, including Grade 4 (0.3%), Grade 3 (2.4%), and Grade 2 (0.9%).

In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, thyroiditis occurred in 0.6% (12/1994) of patients, including Grade 2 (0.2%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks, thyroiditis occurred in 2.7% (22/666) of patients, including Grade 3 (4.5%) and Grade 2 (2.2%).

In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, hyperthyroidism occurred in 2.7% (54/1994) of patients, including Grade 3 (<0.1%) and Grade 2 (1.2%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 1 mg/kg with YERVOY 3 mg/kg every 3 weeks, hyperthyroidism occurred in 9% (42/456) of patients, including Grade 3 (0.9%) and Grade 2 (4.2%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks, hyperthyroidism occurred in 12% (80/666) of patients, including Grade 3 (0.6%) and Grade 2 (4.5%).

In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, hypothyroidism occurred in 8% (163/1994) of patients, including Grade 3 (0.2%) and Grade 2 (4.8%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 1 mg/kg with YERVOY 3 mg/kg every 3 weeks, hypothyroidism occurred in 20% (91/456) of patients, including Grade 3 (0.4%) and Grade 2 (11%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks, hypothyroidism occurred in 18% (122/666) of patients, including Grade 3 (0.6%) and Grade 2 (11%).

In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, diabetes occurred in 0.9% (17/1994) of patients, including Grade 3 (0.4%) and Grade 2 (0.3%), and 2 cases of diabetic ketoacidosis. In patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks, diabetes occurred in 2.7% (15/666) of patients, including Grade 4 (0.6%), Grade 3 (0.3%), and Grade 2 (0.9%).

Immune-Mediated Nephritis with Renal Dysfunction

OPDIVO and YERVOY can cause immune-mediated nephritis. In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, immune-mediated nephritis and renal dysfunction occurred in 1.2% (23/1994) of patients, including Grade 4 (<0.1%), Grade 3 (0.5%), and Grade 2 (0.6%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks, immune-mediated nephritis with renal dysfunction occurred in 4.1% (27/666) of patients, including Grade 4 (0.6%), Grade 3 (1.1%), and Grade 2 (2.2%).

Immune-Mediated Dermatologic Adverse Reactions

OPDIVO can cause immune-mediated rash or dermatitis. Exfoliative dermatitis, including Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), and drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) has occurred with PD-1/PD-L1 blocking antibodies. Topical emollients and/or topical corticosteroids may be adequate to treat mild to moderate nonexfoliative rashes.

YERVOY can cause immune-mediated rash or dermatitis, including bullous and exfoliative dermatitis, SJS, TEN, and DRESS. Topical emollients and/or topical corticosteroids may be adequate to treat mild to moderate non-bullous/exfoliative rashes.

Withhold or permanently discontinue OPDIVO and YERVOY depending on severity (please see section 2 Dosage and Administration in the accompanying Full Prescribing Information).

In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy, immune-mediated rash occurred in 9% (171/1994) of patients, including Grade 3 (1.1%) and Grade 2 (2.2%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 1 mg/kg with YERVOY 3 mg/kg every 3 weeks, immune-mediated rash occurred in 28% (127/456) of patients, including Grade 3 (4.8%) and Grade 2 (10%). In patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks, immune-mediated rash occurred in 16% (108/666) of patients, including Grade 3 (3.5%) and Grade 2 (4.2%).

Other Immune-Mediated Adverse Reactions

The following clinically significant immune-mediated adverse reactions occurred at an incidence of <1% (unless otherwise noted) in patients who received OPDIVO monotherapy or OPDIVO in combination with YERVOY or were reported with the use of other PD-1/PD-L1 blocking antibodies. Severe or fatal cases have been reported for some of these adverse reactions: cardiac/vascular: myocarditis, pericarditis, vasculitis; nervous system: meningitis, encephalitis, myelitis and demyelination, myasthenic syndrome/myasthenia gravis (including exacerbation), Guillain-Barré syndrome, nerve paresis, autoimmune neuropathy; ocular: uveitis, iritis, and other ocular inflammatory toxicities can occur; gastrointestinal: pancreatitis to include increases in serum amylase and lipase levels, gastritis, duodenitis; musculoskeletal and connective tissue: myositis/polymyositis, rhabdomyolysis, and associated sequelae including renal failure, arthritis, polymyalgia rheumatica; endocrine: hypoparathyroidism; other (hematologic/immune): hemolytic anemia, aplastic anemia, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), systemic inflammatory response syndrome, histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis (Kikuchi lymphadenitis), sarcoidosis, immune thrombocytopenic purpura, solid organ transplant rejection, other transplant (including corneal graft) rejection.

In addition to the immune-mediated adverse reactions listed above, across clinical trials of YERVOY monotherapy or in combination with OPDIVO, the following clinically significant immune-mediated adverse reactions, some with fatal outcome, occurred in <1% of patients unless otherwise specified: nervous system: autoimmune neuropathy (2%), myasthenic syndrome/myasthenia gravis, motor dysfunction; cardiovascular: angiopathy, temporal arteritis; ocular: blepharitis, episcleritis, orbital myositis, scleritis; gastrointestinal: pancreatitis (1.3%); other (hematologic/immune): conjunctivitis, cytopenias (2.5%), eosinophilia (2.1%), erythema multiforme, hypersensitivity vasculitis, neurosensory hypoacusis, psoriasis.

Some ocular IMAR cases can be associated with retinal detachment. Various grades of visual impairment, including blindness, can occur. If uveitis occurs in combination with other immune-mediated adverse reactions, consider a Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada-like syndrome, which has been observed in patients receiving OPDIVO and YERVOY, as this may require treatment with systemic corticosteroids to reduce the risk of permanent vision loss.

Infusion-Related Reactions

OPDIVO and YERVOY can cause severe infusion-related reactions. Discontinue OPDIVO and YERVOY in patients with severe (Grade 3) or life-threatening (Grade 4) infusion-related reactions. Interrupt or slow the rate of infusion in patients with mild (Grade 1) or moderate (Grade 2) infusion-related reactions. In patients receiving OPDIVO monotherapy as a 60-minute infusion, infusion-related reactions occurred in 6.4% (127/1994) of patients. In a separate trial in which patients received OPDIVO monotherapy as a 60-minute infusion or a 30- minute infusion, infusion-related reactions occurred in 2.2% (8/368) and 2.7% (10/369) of patients, respectively. Additionally, 0.5% (2/368) and 1.4% (5/369) of patients, respectively, experienced adverse reactions within 48 hours of infusion that led to dose delay, permanent discontinuation or withholding of OPDIVO. In melanoma patients receiving OPDIVO 1 mg/kg with YERVOY 3 mg/kg every 3 weeks, infusion-related reactions occurred in 2.5% (10/407) of patients. In HCC patients receiving OPDIVO 1 mg/kg with YERVOY 3 mg/kg every 3 weeks, infusion-related reactions occurred in 8% (4/49) of patients. In RCC patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks, infusion-related reactions occurred in 5.1% (28/547) of patients. In MSI-H/dMMR mCRC patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks, infusion-related reactions occurred in 4.2% (5/119) of patients. In MPM patients receiving OPDIVO 3 mg/kg every 2 weeks with YERVOY 1 mg/kg every 6 weeks, infusion-related reactions occurred in 12% (37/300) of patients.

Complications of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

Fatal and other serious complications can occur in patients who receive allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) before or after being treated with OPDIVO or YERVOY. Transplant-related complications include hyperacute graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD), acute GVHD, chronic GVHD, hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD) after reduced intensity conditioning, and steroid-requiring febrile syndrome (without an identified infectious cause). These complications may occur despite intervening therapy between OPDIVO or YERVOY and allogeneic HSCT.

Follow patients closely for evidence of transplant-related complications and intervene promptly. Consider the benefit versus risks of treatment with OPDIVO and YERVOY prior to or after an allogeneic HSCT.

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity

Based on its mechanism of action and findings from animal studies, OPDIVO and YERVOY can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. The effects of YERVOY are likely to be greater during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. Advise pregnant women of the potential risk to a fetus. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with OPDIVO and YERVOY and for at least 5 months after the last dose.

Increased Mortality in Patients with Multiple Myeloma when OPDIVO is Added to a Thalidomide Analogue and Dexamethasone

In randomized clinical trials in patients with multiple myeloma, the addition of OPDIVO to a thalidomide analogue plus dexamethasone resulted in increased mortality. Treatment of patients with multiple myeloma with a PD-1 or PD-L1 blocking antibody in combination with a thalidomide analogue plus dexamethasone is not recommended outside of controlled clinical trials.

Lactation

There are no data on the presence of OPDIVO or YERVOY in human milk, the effects on the breastfed child, or the effects on milk production. Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in breastfed children, advise women not to breastfeed during treatment and for 5 months after the last dose.

Serious Adverse Reactions

In Checkmate 037, serious adverse reactions occurred in 41% of patients receiving OPDIVO (n=268). Grade 3 and 4 adverse reactions occurred in 42% of patients receiving OPDIVO. The most frequent Grade 3 and 4 adverse drug reactions reported in 2% to <5% of patients receiving OPDIVO were abdominal pain, hyponatremia, increased aspartate aminotransferase, and increased lipase. In Checkmate 066, serious adverse reactions occurred in 36% of patients receiving OPDIVO (n=206). Grade 3 and 4 adverse reactions occurred in 41% of patients receiving OPDIVO. The most frequent Grade 3 and 4 adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of patients receiving OPDIVO were gamma-glutamyltransferase increase (3.9%) and diarrhea (3.4%). In Checkmate 067, serious adverse reactions (74% and 44%), adverse reactions leading to permanent discontinuation (47% and 18%) or to dosing delays (58% and 36%), and Grade 3 or 4 adverse reactions (72% and 51%) all occurred more frequently in the OPDIVO plus YERVOY arm (n=313) relative to the OPDIVO arm (n=313). The most frequent (≥10%) serious adverse reactions in the OPDIVO plus YERVOY arm and the OPDIVO arm, respectively, were diarrhea (13% and 2.2%), colitis (10% and 1.9%), and pyrexia (10% and 1.0%). In Checkmate 238, serious adverse reactions occurred in 18% of patients receiving OPDIVO (n=452). Grade 3 or 4 adverse reactions occurred in 25% of OPDIVO-treated patients (n=452). The most frequent Grade 3 and 4 adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of OPDIVO-treated patients were diarrhea and increased lipase and amylase. In Checkmate 816, serious adverse reactions occurred in 30% of patients (n=176) who were treated with OPDIVO in combination with platinum-doublet chemotherapy. Serious adverse reactions in >2% included pneumonia and vomiting. No fatal adverse reactions occurred in patients who received OPDIVO in combination with platinum-doublet chemotherapy. In Checkmate 227, serious adverse reactions occurred in 58% of patients (n=576). The most frequent (≥2%) serious adverse reactions were pneumonia, diarrhea/colitis, pneumonitis, hepatitis, pulmonary embolism, adrenal insufficiency, and hypophysitis. Fatal adverse reactions occurred in 1.7% of patients; these included events of pneumonitis (4 patients), myocarditis, acute kidney injury, shock, hyperglycemia, multi-system organ failure, and renal failure. In Checkmate 9LA, serious adverse reactions occurred in 57% of patients (n=358). The most frequent (>2%) serious adverse reactions were pneumonia, diarrhea, febrile neutropenia, anemia, acute kidney injury, musculoskeletal pain, dyspnea, pneumonitis, and respiratory failure. Fatal adverse reactions occurred in 7 (2%) patients, and included hepatic toxicity, acute renal failure, sepsis, pneumonitis, diarrhea with hypokalemia, and massive hemoptysis in the setting of thrombocytopenia. In Checkmate 017 and 057, serious adverse reactions occurred in 46% of patients receiving OPDIVO (n=418). The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of patients receiving OPDIVO were pneumonia, pulmonary embolism, dyspnea, pyrexia, pleural effusion, pneumonitis, and respiratory failure. In Checkmate 057, fatal adverse reactions occurred; these included events of infection (7 patients, including one case of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia), pulmonary embolism (4 patients), and limbic encephalitis (1 patient). In Checkmate 743, serious adverse reactions occurred in 54% of patients receiving OPDIVO plus YERVOY. The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of patients were pneumonia, pyrexia, diarrhea, pneumonitis, pleural effusion, dyspnea, acute kidney injury, infusion-related reaction, musculoskeletal pain, and pulmonary embolism. Fatal adverse reactions occurred in 4 (1.3%) patients and included pneumonitis, acute heart failure, sepsis, and encephalitis. In Checkmate 214, serious adverse reactions occurred in 59% of patients receiving OPDIVO plus YERVOY (n=547). The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of patients were diarrhea, pyrexia, pneumonia, pneumonitis, hypophysitis, acute kidney injury, dyspnea, adrenal insufficiency, and colitis. In Checkmate 9ER, serious adverse reactions occurred in 48% of patients receiving OPDIVO and cabozantinib (n=320). The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of patients were diarrhea, pneumonia, pneumonitis, pulmonary embolism, urinary tract infection, and hyponatremia. Fatal intestinal perforations occurred in 3 (0.9%) patients. In Checkmate 025, serious adverse reactions occurred in 47% of patients receiving OPDIVO (n=406). The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of patients were acute kidney injury, pleural effusion, pneumonia, diarrhea, and hypercalcemia. In Checkmate 205 and 039, adverse reactions leading to discontinuation occurred in 7% and dose delays due to adverse reactions occurred in 34% of patients (n=266). Serious adverse reactions occurred in 26% of patients. The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in ≥1% of patients were pneumonia, infusion-related reaction, pyrexia, colitis or diarrhea, pleural effusion, pneumonitis, and rash. Eleven patients died from causes other than disease progression: 3 from adverse reactions within 30 days of the last OPDIVO dose, 2 from infection 8 to 9 months after completing OPDIVO, and 6 from complications of allogeneic HSCT. In Checkmate 141, serious adverse reactions occurred in 49% of patients receiving OPDIVO (n=236). The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of patients receiving OPDIVO were pneumonia, dyspnea, respiratory failure, respiratory tract infection, and sepsis. In Checkmate 275, serious adverse reactions occurred in 54% of patients receiving OPDIVO (n=270). The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of patients receiving OPDIVO were urinary tract infection, sepsis, diarrhea, small intestine obstruction, and general physical health deterioration. In Checkmate 274, serious adverse reactions occurred in 30% of patients receiving OPDIVO (n=351). The most frequent serious adverse reaction reported in ≥2% of patients receiving OPDIVO was urinary tract infection. Fatal adverse reactions occurred in 1% of patients; these included events of pneumonitis (0.6%). In Checkmate 901, serious adverse reactions occurred in 48% of patients receiving OPDIVO in combination with chemotherapy. The most frequent serious adverse reactions reporting in ≥2% of patients who received OPDIVO with chemotherapy were urinary tract infection (4.9%), acute kidney injury (4.3%), anemia (3%), pulmonary embolism (2.6%), sepsis (2.3%), and platelet count decreased (2.3%). Fatal adverse reactions occurred in 3.6% of patients who received OPDIVO in combination with chemotherapy; these included sepsis (1%). OPDIVO and/or chemotherapy were discontinued in 30% of patients and were delayed in 67% of patients for an adverse reaction. In Checkmate 142 in MSI-H/dMMR mCRC patients receiving OPDIVO with YERVOY (n=119), serious adverse reactions occurred in 47% of patients. The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of patients were colitis/diarrhea, hepatic events, abdominal pain, acute kidney injury, pyrexia, and dehydration. In Checkmate 040, serious adverse reactions occurred in 59% of patients receiving OPDIVO with YERVOY (n=49). Serious adverse reactions reported in ≥4% of patients were pyrexia, diarrhea, anemia, increased AST, adrenal insufficiency, ascites, esophageal varices hemorrhage, hyponatremia, increased blood bilirubin, and pneumonitis. In Attraction-3, serious adverse reactions occurred in 38% of patients receiving OPDIVO (n=209). Serious adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of patients who received OPDIVO were pneumonia, esophageal fistula, interstitial lung disease, and pyrexia. The following fatal adverse reactions occurred in patients who received OPDIVO: interstitial lung disease or pneumonitis (1.4%), pneumonia (1.0%), septic shock (0.5%), esophageal fistula (0.5%), gastrointestinal hemorrhage (0.5%), pulmonary embolism (0.5%), and sudden death (0.5%). In Checkmate 577, serious adverse reactions occurred in 33% of patients receiving OPDIVO (n=532). A serious adverse reaction reported in ≥2% of patients who received OPDIVO was pneumonitis. A fatal reaction of myocardial infarction occurred in one patient who received OPDIVO. In Checkmate 648, serious adverse reactions occurred in 62% of patients receiving OPDIVO in combination with chemotherapy (n=310). The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of patients who received OPDIVO with chemotherapy were pneumonia (11%), dysphagia (7%), esophageal stenosis (2.9%), acute kidney injury (2.9%), and pyrexia (2.3%). Fatal adverse reactions occurred in 5 (1.6%) patients who received OPDIVO in combination with chemotherapy; these included pneumonitis, pneumatosis intestinalis, pneumonia, and acute kidney injury. In Checkmate 648, serious adverse reactions occurred in 69% of patients receiving OPDIVO in combination with YERVOY (n=322). The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in ≥2% who received OPDIVO in combination with YERVOY were pneumonia (10%), pyrexia (4.3%), pneumonitis (4.0%), aspiration pneumonia (3.7%), dysphagia (3.7%), hepatic function abnormal (2.8%), decreased appetite (2.8%), adrenal insufficiency (2.5%), and dehydration (2.5%). Fatal adverse reactions occurred in 5 (1.6%) patients who received OPDIVO in combination with YERVOY; these included pneumonitis, interstitial lung disease, pulmonary embolism, and acute respiratory distress syndrome. In Checkmate 649, serious adverse reactions occurred in 52% of patients treated with OPDIVO in combination with chemotherapy (n=782). The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of patients treated with OPDIVO in combination with chemotherapy were vomiting (3.7%), pneumonia (3.6%), anemia (3.6%), pyrexia (2.8%), diarrhea (2.7%), febrile neutropenia (2.6%), and pneumonitis (2.4%). Fatal adverse reactions occurred in 16 (2.0%) patients who were treated with OPDIVO in combination with chemotherapy; these included pneumonitis (4 patients), febrile neutropenia (2 patients), stroke (2 patients), gastrointestinal toxicity, intestinal mucositis, septic shock, pneumonia, infection, gastrointestinal bleeding, mesenteric vessel thrombosis, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. In Checkmate 76K, serious adverse reactions occurred in 18% of patients receiving OPDIVO (n=524). Adverse reactions which resulted in permanent discontinuation of OPDIVO in >1% of patients included arthralgia (1.7%), rash (1.7%), and diarrhea (1.1%). A fatal adverse reaction occurred in 1 (0.2%) patient (heart failure and acute kidney injury). The most frequent Grade 3-4 lab abnormalities reported in ≥1% of OPDIVO-treated patients were increased lipase (2.9%), increased AST (2.2%), increased ALT (2.1%), lymphopenia (1.1%), and decreased potassium (1.0%).

Common Adverse Reactions

In Checkmate 037, the most common adverse reaction (≥20%) reported with OPDIVO (n=268) was rash (21%). In Checkmate 066, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) reported with OPDIVO (n=206) vs dacarbazine (n=205) were fatigue (49% vs 39%), musculoskeletal pain (32% vs 25%), rash (28% vs 12%), and pruritus (23% vs 12%). In Checkmate 067, the most common (≥20%) adverse reactions in the OPDIVO plus YERVOY arm (n=313) were fatigue (62%), diarrhea (54%), rash (53%), nausea (44%), pyrexia (40%), pruritus (39%), musculoskeletal pain (32%), vomiting (31%), decreased appetite (29%), cough (27%), headache (26%), dyspnea (24%), upper respiratory tract infection (23%), arthralgia (21%), and increased transaminases (25%). In Checkmate 067, the most common (≥20%) adverse reactions in the OPDIVO arm (n=313) were fatigue (59%), rash (40%), musculoskeletal pain (42%), diarrhea (36%), nausea (30%), cough (28%), pruritus (27%), upper respiratory tract infection (22%), decreased appetite (22%), headache (22%), constipation (21%), arthralgia (21%), and vomiting (20%). In Checkmate 238, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) reported in OPDIVO-treated patients (n=452) vs ipilimumab-treated patients (n=453) were fatigue (57% vs 55%), diarrhea (37% vs 55%), rash (35% vs 47%), musculoskeletal pain (32% vs 27%), pruritus (28% vs 37%), headache (23% vs 31%), nausea (23% vs 28%), upper respiratory infection (22% vs 15%), and abdominal pain (21% vs 23%). The most common immune-mediated adverse reactions were rash (16%), diarrhea/colitis (6%), and hepatitis (3%). In Checkmate 816, the most common (>20%) adverse reactions in the OPDIVO plus chemotherapy arm (n=176) were nausea (38%), constipation (34%), fatigue (26%), decreased appetite (20%), and rash (20%). In Checkmate 227, the most common (≥20%) adverse reactions were fatigue (44%), rash (34%), decreased appetite (31%), musculoskeletal pain (27%), diarrhea/colitis (26%), dyspnea (26%), cough (23%), hepatitis (21%), nausea (21%), and pruritus (21%). In Checkmate 9LA, the most common (>20%) adverse reactions were fatigue (49%), musculoskeletal pain (39%), nausea (32%), diarrhea (31%), rash (30%), decreased appetite (28%), constipation (21%), and pruritus (21%). In Checkmate 017 and 057, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) in patients receiving OPDIVO (n=418) were fatigue, musculoskeletal pain, cough, dyspnea, and decreased appetite. In Checkmate 743, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) in patients receiving OPDIVO plus YERVOY were fatigue (43%), musculoskeletal pain (38%), rash (34%), diarrhea (32%), dyspnea (27%), nausea (24%), decreased appetite (24%), cough (23%), and pruritus (21%). In Checkmate 214, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) reported in patients treated with OPDIVO plus YERVOY (n=547) were fatigue (58%), rash (39%), diarrhea (38%), musculoskeletal pain (37%), pruritus (33%), nausea (30%), cough (28%), pyrexia (25%), arthralgia (23%), decreased appetite (21%), dyspnea (20%), and vomiting (20%). In Checkmate 9ER, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) in patients receiving OPDIVO and cabozantinib (n=320) were diarrhea (64%), fatigue (51%), hepatotoxicity (44%), palmar-plantar erythrodysaesthesia syndrome (40%), stomatitis (37%), rash (36%), hypertension (36%), hypothyroidism (34%), musculoskeletal pain (33%), decreased appetite (28%), nausea (27%), dysgeusia (24%), abdominal pain (22%), cough (20%) and upper respiratory tract infection (20%). In Checkmate 025, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) reported in patients receiving OPDIVO (n=406) vs everolimus (n=397) were fatigue (56% vs 57%), cough (34% vs 38%), nausea (28% vs 29%), rash (28% vs 36%), dyspnea (27% vs 31%), diarrhea (25% vs 32%), constipation (23% vs 18%), decreased appetite (23% vs 30%), back pain (21% vs 16%), and arthralgia (20% vs 14%). In Checkmate 205 and 039, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) reported in patients receiving OPDIVO (n=266) were upper respiratory tract infection (44%), fatigue (39%), cough (36%), diarrhea (33%), pyrexia (29%), musculoskeletal pain (26%), rash (24%), nausea (20%) and pruritus (20%). In Checkmate 141, the most common adverse reactions (≥10%) in patients receiving OPDIVO (n=236) were cough (14%) and dyspnea (14%) at a higher incidence than investigator’s choice. In Checkmate 275, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) reported in patients receiving OPDIVO (n=270) were fatigue (46%), musculoskeletal pain (30%), nausea (22%), and decreased appetite (22%). In Checkmate 274, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) reported in patients receiving OPDIVO (n=351) were rash (36%), fatigue (36%), diarrhea (30%), pruritus (30%), musculoskeletal pain (28%), and urinary tract infection (22%).In Checkmate 901, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) were nausea, fatigue, musculoskeletal pain, constipation, decreased appetite, rash, vomiting, and peripheral neuropathy. In Checkmate 142 in MSI-H/dMMR mCRC patients receiving OPDIVO as a single agent (n=74), the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) were fatigue (54%), diarrhea (43%), abdominal pain (34%), nausea (34%), vomiting (28%), musculoskeletal pain (28%), cough (26%), pyrexia (24%), rash (23%), constipation (20%), and upper respiratory tract infection (20%). In Checkmate 142 in MSI-H/dMMR mCRC patients receiving OPDIVO with YERVOY (n=119), the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) were fatigue (49%), diarrhea (45%), pyrexia (36%), musculoskeletal pain (36%), abdominal pain (30%), pruritus (28%), nausea (26%), rash (25%), decreased appetite (20%), and vomiting (20%). In Checkmate 040, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) in patients receiving OPDIVO with YERVOY (n=49), were rash (53%), pruritus (53%), musculoskeletal pain (41%), diarrhea (39%), cough (37%), decreased appetite (35%), fatigue (27%), pyrexia (27%), abdominal pain (22%), headache (22%), nausea (20%), dizziness (20%), hypothyroidism (20%), and weight decreased (20%). In Attraction-3, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) in OPDIVO-treated patients (n=209) were rash (22%) and decreased appetite (21%). In Checkmate 577, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) in patients receiving OPDIVO (n=532) were fatigue (34%), diarrhea (29%), nausea (23%), rash (21%), musculoskeletal pain (21%), and cough (20%). In Checkmate 648, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) in patients treated with OPDIVO in combination with chemotherapy (n=310) were nausea (65%), decreased appetite (51%), fatigue (47%), constipation (44%), stomatitis (44%), diarrhea (29%), and vomiting (23%). In Checkmate 648, the most common adverse reactions reported in ≥20% of patients treated with OPDIVO in combination with YERVOY were rash (31%), fatigue (28%), pyrexia (23%), nausea (22%), diarrhea (22%), and constipation (20%). In Checkmate 649, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) in patients treated with OPDIVO in combination with chemotherapy (n=782) were peripheral neuropathy (53%), nausea (48%), fatigue (44%), diarrhea (39%), vomiting (31%), decreased appetite (29%), abdominal pain (27%), constipation (25%), and musculoskeletal pain (20%). In Checkmate 76K, the most common adverse reactions (≥20%) reported with OPDIVO (n=524) were fatigue (36%), musculoskeletal pain (30%), rash (28%), diarrhea (23%) and pruritis (20%).

Please see U.S. Full Prescribing Information for OPDIVO and YERVOY.

Clinical Trials and Patient Populations

Checkmate 227—previously untreated metastatic non-small cell lung cancer, in combination with YERVOY; Checkmate 9LA-previously untreated recurrent or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer in combination with YERVOY and 2 cycles of platinum-doublet chemotherapy by histology; Checkmate 649-previously untreated advanced or metastatic gastric cancer, gastroesophageal junction and esophageal adenocarcinoma; Checkmate 577-adjuvant treatment of esophageal or gastroesophageal junction cancer; Checkmate 238- adjuvant treatment of patients with completely resected Stage III or Stage IV melanoma; Checkmate 76K- adjuvant treatment of patients 12 years of age and older with completely resected Stage IIB or Stage IIC melanoma; Checkmate 274-adjuvant treatment of urothelial carcinoma; Checkmate 275-previously treated advanced or metastatic urothelial carcinoma; Checkmate 142-MSI-H or dMMR metastatic colorectal cancer, as a single agent or in combination with YERVOY; Checkmate 142-MSI-H or dMMR metastatic colorectal cancer, as a single agent or in combination with YERVOY; Attraction-3-esophageal squamous cell carcinoma; Checkmate 648—previously untreated, unresectable advanced recurrent or metastatic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma; Checkmate 648—previously untreated, unresectable advanced recurrent or metastatic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma; Checkmate 040-hepatocellular carcinoma, in combination with YERVOY; Checkmate 743-previously untreated unresectable malignant pleural mesothelioma, in combination with YERVOY; Checkmate 037-previously treated metastatic melanoma; Checkmate 066—previously untreated metastatic melanoma; Checkmate 067-previously untreated metastatic melanoma, as a single agent or in combination with YERVOY; Checkmate 017-second-line treatment of metastatic squamous non-small cell lung cancer; Checkmate 057-second-line treatment of metastatic non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer; Checkmate 816-neoadjuvant non-small cell lung cancer, in combination with platinum-doublet chemotherapy; Checkmate 901-Adult patients with unresectable or metastatic urothelial carcinoma; Checkmate 141-recurrent or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck; Checkmate 025-previously treated renal cell carcinoma; Checkmate 214-previously untreated renal cell carcinoma, in combination with YERVOY; Checkmate 9ER-previously untreated renal cell carcinoma, in combination with cabozantinib; Checkmate 205/039-classical Hodgkin lymphoma

OPDUALAG

INDICATION

Opdualag™ (nivolumab and relatlimab-rmbw) is indicated for the treatment of adult and pediatric patients 12 years of age or older with unresectable or metastatic melanoma.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Severe and Fatal Immune-Mediated Adverse Reactions

Immune-mediated adverse reactions (IMARs) listed herein may not include all possible severe and fatal immune-mediated adverse reactions.

IMARs which may be severe or fatal, can occur in any organ system or tissue. IMARs can occur at any time after starting treatment with a LAG-3 and PD-1/PD-L1 blocking antibodies. While IMARs usually manifest during treatment, they can also occur after discontinuation of Opdualag. Early identification and management of IMARs are essential to ensure safe use. Monitor patients closely for symptoms and signs that may be clinical manifestations of underlying IMARs. Evaluate clinical chemistries including liver enzymes, creatinine, and thyroid function at baseline and periodically during treatment. In cases of suspected IMARs, initiate appropriate workup to exclude alternative etiologies, including infection. Institute medical management promptly, including specialty consultation as appropriate.

Withhold or permanently discontinue Opdualag depending on severity (please see section 2 Dosage and Administration in the accompanying Full Prescribing Information). In general, if Opdualag requires interruption or discontinuation, administer systemic corticosteroid therapy (1 to 2 mg/kg/day prednisone or equivalent) until improvement to Grade 1 or less. Upon improvement to Grade 1 or less, initiate corticosteroid taper and continue to taper over at least 1 month. Consider administration of other systemic immunosuppressants in patients whose IMARs are not controlled with corticosteroid therapy. Toxicity management guidelines for adverse reactions that do not necessarily require systemic steroids (e.g., endocrinopathies and dermatologic reactions) are discussed below.

Immune-Mediated Pneumonitis

Opdualag can cause immune-mediated pneumonitis, which may be fatal. In patients treated with other PD- 1/PD-L1 blocking antibodies, the incidence of pneumonitis is higher in patients who have received prior thoracic radiation. Immune-mediated pneumonitis occurred in 3.7% (13/355) of patients receiving Opdualag, including Grade 3 (0.6%), and Grade 2 (2.3%) adverse reactions. Pneumonitis led to permanent discontinuation of Opdualag in 0.8% and withholding of Opdualag in 1.4% of patients.

Immune-Mediated Colitis

Opdualag can cause immune-mediated colitis, defined as requiring use of corticosteroids and no clear alternate etiology. A common symptom included in the definition of colitis was diarrhea. Cytomegalovirus infection/reactivation has been reported in patients with corticosteroid-refractory immune-mediated colitis. In cases of corticosteroid-refractory colitis, consider repeating infectious workup to exclude alternative etiologies.

Immune-mediated diarrhea or colitis occurred in 7% (24/355) of patients receiving Opdualag, including Grade 3 (1.1%) and Grade 2 (4.5%) adverse reactions. Colitis led to permanent discontinuation of Opdualag in 2% and withholding of Opdualag in 2.8% of patients.

Immune-Mediated Hepatitis

Opdualag can cause immune-mediated hepatitis, defined as requiring the use of corticosteroids and no clear alternate etiology.

Immune-mediated hepatitis occurred in 6% (20/355) of patients receiving Opdualag, including Grade 4 (0.6%), Grade 3 (3.4%), and Grade 2 (1.4%) adverse reactions. Hepatitis led to permanent discontinuation of Opdualag in 1.7% and withholding of Opdualag in 2.3% of patients.

Immune-Mediated Endocrinopathies

Opdualag can cause primary or secondary adrenal insufficiency, hypophysitis, thyroid disorders, and Type 1 diabetes mellitus, which can be present with diabetic ketoacidosis. Withhold or permanently discontinue Opdualag depending on severity (please see section 2 Dosage and Administration in the accompanying Full Prescribing Information).

For Grade 2 or higher adrenal insufficiency, initiate symptomatic treatment, including hormone replacement as clinically indicated. In patients receiving Opdualag, adrenal insufficiency occurred in 4.2% (15/355) of patients receiving Opdualag, including Grade 3 (1.4%) and Grade 2 (2.5%) adverse reactions. Adrenal insufficiency led to permanent discontinuation of Opdualag in 1.1% and withholding of Opdualag in 0.8% of patients.

Hypophysitis can present with acute symptoms associated with mass effect such as headache, photophobia, or visual field defects. Hypophysitis can cause hypopituitarism; initiate hormone replacement as clinically indicated. Hypophysitis occurred in 2.5% (9/355) of patients receiving Opdualag, including Grade 3 (0.3%) and Grade 2 (1.4%) adverse reactions. Hypophysitis led to permanent discontinuation of Opdualag in 0.3% and withholding of Opdualag in 0.6% of patients.

Thyroiditis can present with or without endocrinopathy. Hypothyroidism can follow hyperthyroidism; initiate hormone replacement or medical management as clinically indicated. Thyroiditis occurred in 2.8% (10/355) of patients receiving Opdualag, including Grade 2 (1.1%) adverse reactions. Thyroiditis did not lead to permanent discontinuation of Opdualag. Thyroiditis led to withholding of Opdualag in 0.3% of patients. Hyperthyroidism occurred in 6% (22/355) of patients receiving Opdualag, including Grade 2 (1.4%) adverse reactions. Hyperthyroidism did not lead to permanent discontinuation of Opdualag. Hyperthyroidism led to withholding of Opdualag in 0.3% of patients. Hypothyroidism occurred in 17% (59/355) of patients receiving Opdualag, including Grade 2 (11%) adverse reactions. Hypothyroidism led to the permanent discontinuation of Opdualag in 0.3% and withholding of Opdualag in 2.5% of patients.

Monitor patients for hyperglycemia or other signs and symptoms of diabetes; initiate treatment with insulin as clinically indicated. Diabetes occurred in 0.3% (1/355) of patients receiving Opdualag, a Grade 3 (0.3%) adverse reaction, and no cases of diabetic ketoacidosis. Diabetes did not lead to the permanent discontinuation or withholding of Opdualag in any patient.

Immune-Mediated Nephritis with Renal Dysfunction

Opdualag can cause immune-mediated nephritis, which is defined as requiring use of steroids and no clear etiology. In patients receiving Opdualag, immune-mediated nephritis and renal dysfunction occurred in 2% (7/355) of patients, including Grade 3 (1.1%) and Grade 2 (0.8%) adverse reactions. Immune-mediated nephritis and renal dysfunction led to permanent discontinuation of Opdualag in 0.8% and withholding of Opdualag in 0.6% of patients.

Withhold or permanently discontinue Opdualag depending on severity (please see section 2 Dosage and Administration in the accompanying Full Prescribing Information).

Immune-Mediated Dermatologic Adverse Reactions

Opdualag can cause immune-mediated rash or dermatitis, defined as requiring use of steroids and no clear alternate etiology. Exfoliative dermatitis, including Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis, and Drug Rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms has occurred with PD-1/L-1 blocking antibodies. Topical emollients and/or topical corticosteroids may be adequate to treat mild to moderate non-exfoliative rashes.

Withhold or permanently discontinue Opdualag depending on severity (please see section 2 Dosage and Administration in the accompanying Full Prescribing Information).

Immune-mediated rash occurred in 9% (33/355) of patients, including Grade 3 (0.6%) and Grade 2 (3.4%) adverse reactions. Immune-mediated rash did not lead to permanent discontinuation of Opdualag. Immune- mediated rash led to withholding of Opdualag in 1.4% of patients.

Immune-Mediated Myocarditis

Opdualag can cause immune-mediated myocarditis, which is defined as requiring use of steroids and no clear alternate etiology. The diagnosis of immune-mediated myocarditis requires a high index of suspicion. Patients with cardiac or cardio-pulmonary symptoms should be assessed for potential myocarditis. If myocarditis is suspected, withhold dose, promptly initiate high dose steroids (prednisone or methylprednisolone 1 to 2 mg/kg/day) and promptly arrange cardiology consultation with diagnostic workup. If clinically confirmed, permanently discontinue Opdualag for Grade 2-4 myocarditis.

Myocarditis occurred in 1.7% (6/355) of patients receiving Opdualag, including Grade 3 (0.6%), and Grade 2 (1.1%) adverse reactions. Myocarditis led to permanent discontinuation of Opdualag in 1.7% of patients.

Other Immune-Mediated Adverse Reactions

The following clinically significant IMARs occurred at an incidence of <1% (unless otherwise noted) in patients who received Opdualag or were reported with the use of other PD-1/PD-L1 blocking antibodies. Severe or fatal cases have been reported for some of these adverse reactions: Cardiac/Vascular: pericarditis, vasculitis; Nervous System: meningitis, encephalitis, myelitis and demyelination, myasthenic syndrome/myasthenia gravis (including exacerbation), Guillain-Barré syndrome, nerve paresis, autoimmune neuropathy; Ocular: uveitis, iritis, and other ocular inflammatory toxicities can occur. Some cases can be associated with retinal detachment. Various grades of visual impairment, including blindness, can occur. If uveitis occurs in combination with other IMARs, consider a Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada-like syndrome, as this may require treatment with systemic steroids to reduce the risk of permanent vision loss; Gastrointestinal: pancreatitis including increases in serum amylase and lipase levels, gastritis, duodenitis; Musculoskeletal and Connective Tissue: myositis/polymyositis, rhabdomyolysis (and associated sequelae including renal failure), arthritis, polymyalgia rheumatica; Endocrine: hypoparathyroidism; Other (Hematologic/Immune): hemolytic anemia, aplastic anemia, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, systemic inflammatory response syndrome, histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis (Kikuchi lymphadenitis), sarcoidosis, immune thrombocytopenic purpura, solid organ transplant rejection, other transplant (including corneal graft) rejection.

Infusion-Related Reactions

Opdualag can cause severe infusion-related reactions. Discontinue Opdualag in patients with severe or life- threatening infusion-related reactions. Interrupt or slow the rate of infusion in patients with mild to moderate infusion-related reactions. In patients who received Opdualag as a 60-minute intravenous infusion, infusion- related reactions occurred in 7% (23/355) of patients.

Complications of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT)

Fatal and other serious complications can occur in patients who receive allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) before or after being treated with a PD-1/PD-L1 receptor blocking antibody. Transplant- related complications include hyperacute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), acute GVHD, chronic GVHD, hepatic veno-occlusive disease after reduced intensity conditioning, and steroid-requiring febrile syndrome (without an identified infectious cause). These complications may occur despite intervening therapy between PD-1/PD-L1 blockade and allogeneic HSCT.

Follow patients closely for evidence of transplant-related complications and intervene promptly. Consider the benefit versus risks of treatment with a PD-1/PD-L1 receptor blocking antibody prior to or after an allogeneic HSCT.

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity

Based on its mechanism of action and data from animal studies, Opdualag can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Advise pregnant women of the potential risk to a fetus. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with Opdualag and for at least 5 months after the last dose of Opdualag.

Lactation

There are no data on the presence of Opdualag in human milk, the effects on the breastfed child, or the effect on milk production. Because nivolumab and relatlimab may be excreted in human milk and because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in a breastfed child, advise patients not to breastfeed during treatment with Opdualag and for at least 5 months after the last dose.

Serious Adverse Reactions

In Relativity-047, fatal adverse reactions occurred in 3 (0.8%) patients who were treated with Opdualag; these included hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, acute edema of the lung, and pneumonitis. Serious adverse reactions occurred in 36% of patients treated with Opdualag. The most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in ≥1% of patients treated with Opdualag were adrenal insufficiency (1.4%), anemia (1.4%), colitis (1.4%), pneumonia (1.4%), acute myocardial infarction (1.1%), back pain (1.1%), diarrhea (1.1%), myocarditis (1.1%), and pneumonitis (1.1%).

Common Adverse Reactions and Laboratory Abnormalities

The most common adverse reactions reported in ≥20% of the patients treated with Opdualag were musculoskeletal pain (45%), fatigue (39%), rash (28%), pruritus (25%), and diarrhea (24%).

The most common laboratory abnormalities that occurred in ≥20% of patients treated with Opdualag were decreased hemoglobin (37%), decreased lymphocytes (32%), increased AST (30%), increased ALT (26%), and decreased sodium (24%).

Please see U.S. Full Prescribing Information for Opdualag.

KRAZATI

INDICATION

KRAZATI is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with KRASG12C-mutated locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as determined by an FDA-approved test, who have received at least one prior systemic therapy.

This indication is approved under accelerated approval based on objective response rate (ORR) and duration of response (DOR). Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of a clinical benefit in a confirmatory trial(s).

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

GASTROINTESTINAL ADVERSE REACTIONS

  • In the pooled safety population, serious gastrointestinal adverse reactions observed were gastrointestinal obstruction in 1.6%, including 1.4% grade 3 or 4, gastrointestinal bleeding in 0.5% of patients, including 0.5% grade 3, and colitis in 0.3%, including 0.3% grade 3. In addition, nausea, diarrhea, or vomiting occurred in 89% of 366 patients, including 9% grade 3. Nausea, diarrhea, or vomiting led to dosage interruption or dose reduction in 29% of patients and permanent discontinuation of KRAZATI in 0.3%
  • Monitor and manage patients using supportive care, including antidiarrheals, antiemetics, or fluid replacement, as indicated. Withhold, reduce the dose, or permanently discontinue KRAZATI based on severity

QTC INTERVAL PROLONGATION

  • KRAZATI can cause QTc interval prolongation, which can increase the risk for ventricular tachyarrhythmias (e.g., torsades de pointes) or sudden death
  • In the pooled safety population, 6% of 366 patients with at least one post-baseline electrocardiogram (ECG) assessment had an average QTc ≥501 ms, and 11% of patients had an increase from baseline of QTc >60 msec. KRAZATI causes concentration-dependent increases in the QTc interval
  • Avoid concomitant use of KRAZATI with other products with a known potential to prolong the QTc interval. Avoid use of KRAZATI in patients with congenital long QT syndrome and in patients with concurrent QTc prolongation
  • Monitor ECGs and electrolytes prior to starting KRAZATI, during concomitant use, and as clinically indicated in patients with congestive heart failure, bradyarrhythmias, electrolyte abnormalities, and in patients who are taking medications that are known to prolong the QT interval. Withhold, reduce the dose, or permanently discontinue KRAZATI, depending on severity

HEPATOTOXICITY

  • KRAZATI can cause hepatotoxicity
  • In the pooled safety population, hepatotoxicity occurred in 37%, and 7% were grade 3 or 4. A total of 32% of patients who received KRAZATI had increased alanine aminotransferase (ALT)/increased aspartate aminotransferase (AST); 5% were grade 3 and 0.5% were grade 4. Increased ALT/AST leading to dose interruption or reduction occurred in 11% of patients. KRAZATI was discontinued due to increased ALT/AST in 0.5% of patients
  • Monitor liver laboratory tests (AST, ALT, alkaline phosphatase, and total bilirubin) prior to the start of KRAZATI, and monthly for 3 months or as clinically indicated, with more frequent testing in patients who develop transaminase elevations. Reduce the dose, withhold, or permanently discontinue KRAZATI based on severity

INTERSTITIAL LUNG DISEASE /PNEUMONITIS

  • KRAZATI can cause interstitial lung disease (ILD)/pneumonitis, which can be fatal. In the pooled safety population, ILD/pneumonitis occurred in 4.1% of patients, 1.4% were grade 3 or 4, and 1 case was fatal. The median time to first onset for ILD/pneumonitis was 12 weeks (range: 5 to 31 weeks). KRAZATI was discontinued due to ILD/pneumonitis in 0.8% of patients
  • Monitor patients for new or worsening respiratory symptoms indicative of ILD/pneumonitis (eg, dyspnea, cough, fever). Withhold KRAZATI in patients with suspected ILD/pneumonitis and permanently discontinue KRAZATI if no other potential causes of ILD/pneumonitis are identified

ADVERSE REACTIONS

  • The most common adverse reactions (≥25%) are nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, fatigue, musculoskeletal pain, hepatotoxicity, renal impairment, edema, dyspnea, decreased appetite

FEMALES AND MALES OF REPRODUCTIVE POTENTIAL

  • Infertility: Based on findings from animal studies, KRAZATI may impair fertility in females and males of reproductive potential

Please see U.S. Full Prescribing Information for KRAZATI.

BREYANZI

INDICATION

BREYANZI is a CD19-directed genetically modified autologous T cell immunotherapy indicated for the treatment of:

  • adult patients with large B-cell lymphoma (LBCL), including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) not otherwise specified (including DLBCL arising from indolent lymphoma), high-grade B-cell lymphoma, primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma, and follicular lymphoma grade 3B, who have:
    • refractory disease to first-line chemoimmunotherapy or relapse within 12 months of first-line chemoimmunotherapy; or
    • refractory disease to first-line chemoimmunotherapy or relapse after first line chemoimmunotherapy and are not eligible for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) due to comorbidities or age; or
    • relapsed or refractory disease after two or more lines of systemic therapy.

Limitations of Use: BREYANZI is not indicated for the treatment of patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma.

  • Adult patients with relapsed or refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) or small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL) who have received at least 2 prior lines of therapy, including a Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor and a B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL-2) inhibitor. This indication is approved under accelerated approval based on response rate and duration of response. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in confirmatory trial(s).
  • Adult patients with relapsed or refractory follicular lymphoma (FL) who have received 2 or more prior lines of systemic therapy. This indication is approved under accelerated approval based on response rate and duration of response. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in confirmatory trial(s).

Important Safety Information

WARNING: CYTOKINE RELEASE SYNDROME, NEUROLOGIC TOXICITIES, AND SECONDARY HEMATOLOGICAL MALIGNANCIES

  • Cytokine Release Syndrome (CRS), including fatal or life-threatening reactions, occurred in patients receiving BREYANZI. Do not administer BREYANZI to patients with active infection or inflammatory disorders. Treat severe or life-threatening CRS with tocilizumab with or without corticosteroids.
  • Neurologic toxicities, including fatal or life-threatening reactions, occurred in patients receiving BREYANZI, including concurrently with CRS, after CRS resolution, or in the absence of CRS. Monitor for neurologic events after treatment with BREYANZI. Provide supportive care and/or corticosteroids as needed
  • T cell malignancies have occurred following treatment of hematologic malignancies with BCMA- and CD19-directed genetically modified autologous T cell immunotherapies, including BREYANZI
  • BREYANZI is available only through a restricted program under a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) called the BREYANZI REMS.

Cytokine Release Syndrome (CRS)

Cytokine release syndrome (CRS), including fatal or life-threatening reactions, occurred following treatment with BREYANZI. In clinical trials of BREYANZI which enrolled a total of 614 patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), CRS occurred in 53% of patients, including Grade 3 or higher CRS in 4% of patients. The median time to onset was 5 days (range: 1 to 63 days). CRS resolved in 98% of patients with median duration of 5 days (range: 1 to 37 days). The most common manifestations of CRS (>10%) were fever, hypotension, tachycardia, chills, hypoxia and headache.

Serious events that may be associated with CRS include cardiac arrhythmias (including atrial fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia), cardiac arrest, cardiac failure, diffuse alveolar damage, renal insufficiency, capillary leak syndrome, hypotension, hypoxia, and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis/macrophage activation syndrome (HLH/MAS).

Ensure that 2 doses of tocilizumab are available prior to infusion of BREYANZI.

Neurologic Toxicities

Neurologic toxicities that were fatal or life-threatening, including immune effector cell-associated neurotoxicity syndrome (ICANS), occurred following treatment with BREYANZI. Serious events including cerebral edema and seizures occurred with BREYANZI. Fatal and serious cases of leukoencephalopathy, some attributable to fludarabine, also occurred.

In clinical trials of BREYANZI, CAR T cell-associated neurologic toxicities occurred in 31% of patients, including > Grade 3 cases in 10% of patients. The median time to onset of neurotoxicity was 8 days (range: 1 to 63 days). Neurologic toxicities resolved in 87% of patients with a median duration of 8 days (range: 1 to 119 days). Of patients developing neurotoxicity, 81% also developed CRS.

The most common neurologic toxicities (≥ 5%) included encephalopathy, tremor, aphasia, headache, dizziness, and delirium.

CRS and Neurologic Toxicities Monitoring

Monitor patients daily for at least 7 days following BREYANZI infusion at a REMS-certified healthcare facility for signs and symptoms of CRS and neurologic toxicities and assess for other causes of neurological symptoms. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of CRS and neurologic toxicities for at least 4 weeks after infusion and treat promptly. At the first sign of CRS, institute treatment with supportive care, tocilizumab, or tocilizumab and corticosteroids as indicated. Manage neurologic toxicity with supportive care and/or corticosteroid as needed. Counsel patients to seek immediate medical attention should signs or symptoms of CRS or neurologic toxicity occur at any time.

BREYANZI REMS

Because of the risk of CRS and neurologic toxicities, BREYANZI is available only through a restricted program under a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) called the BREYANZI REMS. The required components of the BREYANZI REMS are:

  • Healthcare facilities that dispense and administer BREYANZI must be enrolled and comply with the REMS requirements.
  • Certified healthcare facilities must have on-site, immediate access to tocilizumab.
  • Ensure that a minimum of 2 doses of tocilizumab are available for each patient for infusion within 2 hours after BREYANZI infusion, if needed for treatment of CRS.

Further information is available at www.BreyanziREMS.com, or contact Bristol Myers Squibb at 1-866-340-7332.

Hypersensitivity Reactions

Allergic reactions may occur with the infusion of BREYANZI. Serious hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis, may be due to dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO).

Serious Infections

Severe infections, including life-threatening or fatal infections, have occurred in patients after BREYANZI infusion. In clinical trials of BREYANZI, infections of any grade occurred in 33% of patients, with Grade 3 or higher infections occurring in 12% of all patients. Grade 3 or higher infections with an unspecified pathogen occurred in 7%, bacterial infections in 4%, viral infections in 2%, and fungal infections in 0.7% of patients. One patient who received four prior lines of therapy developed a fatal case of John Cunningham (JC) virus progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy four months after treatment with BREYANZI.

Febrile neutropenia developed after BREYANZI infusion in 8% of patients. Febrile neutropenia may be concurrent with CRS. In the event of febrile neutropenia, evaluate for infection and manage with broad spectrum antibiotics, fluids, and other supportive care as medically indicated.

Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of infection before and after BREYANZI administration and treat appropriately. Administer prophylactic antimicrobials according to standard institutional guidelines. Avoid administration of BREYANZI in patients with clinically significant, active systemic infections.

Viral reactivation: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation, in some cases resulting in fulminant hepatitis, hepatic failure, and death, can occur in patients treated with drugs directed against B cells. In clinical trials of BREYANZI, 26 of 29 patients with prior history of HBV were treated with concurrent antiviral suppressive therapy. Perform screening for HBV, HCV, and HIV in accordance with clinical guidelines before collection of cells for manufacturing. In patients with prior history of HBV, consider concurrent antiviral suppressive therapy to prevent HBV reactivation per standard guidelines.

Prolonged Cytopenias

Patients may exhibit cytopenias not resolved for several weeks following lymphodepleting chemotherapy and BREYANZI infusion. In clinical trials of BREYANZI, Grade 3 or higher cytopenias persisted at Day 29 following BREYANZI infusion in 34% of patients, and included thrombocytopenia in 24%, neutropenia in 22%, and anemia in 7% of patients. Monitor complete blood counts prior to and after BREYANZI administration.

Hypogammaglobulinemia

B-cell aplasia and hypogammaglobulinemia can occur in patients receiving treatment with BREYANZI. In clinical trials of BREYANZI, hypogammaglobulinemia was reported as an adverse reaction in 10% of patients. Hypogammaglobulinemia, either as an adverse reaction or laboratory IgG level below 500 mg/dL after infusion, was reported in 29% of patients. Monitor immunoglobulin levels after treatment with BREYANZI and manage using infection precautions, antibiotic prophylaxis, and immunoglobulin replacement as clinically indicated.

Live vaccines: The safety of immunization with live viral vaccines during or following BREYANZI treatment has not been studied. Vaccination with live virus vaccines is not recommended for at least 6 weeks prior to the start of lymphodepleting chemotherapy, during BREYANZI treatment, and until immune recovery following treatment with BREYANZI.

Secondary Malignancies

Patients treated with BREYANZI may develop secondary malignancies. T cell malignancies have occurred following treatment of hematologic malignancies with BCMA- and CD19-directed genetically modified autologous T cell immunotherapies, including BREYANZI. Mature T cell malignancies, including CAR-positive tumors, may present as soon as weeks following infusion, and may include fatal outcomes. Monitor lifelong for secondary malignancies. In the event that a secondary malignancy occurs, contact Bristol Myers Squibb at 1-888-805-4555 for reporting and to obtain instructions on collection of patient samples for testing.

Effects on Ability to Drive and Use Machines

Due to the potential for neurologic events, including altered mental status or seizures, patients receiving BREYANZI are at risk for developing altered or decreased consciousness or impaired coordination in the 8 weeks following BREYANZI administration. Advise patients to refrain from driving and engaging in hazardous occupations or activities, such as operating heavy or potentially dangerous machinery, for at least 8 weeks.

Immune Effector Cell-Associated Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis-Like Syndrome (IEC-HS)

Immune Effector Cell-Associated Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis (IEC-HS), including fatal or life-threatening reactions, occurred following treatment with BREYANZI. Three of 89 (3%) safety evaluable patients with R/R CLL/SLL developed IEC-HS. Time to onset of IEC-HS ranged from 7 to 18 days. Two of the 3 patients developed IEC-HS in the setting of ongoing CRS and 1 in the setting of ongoing neurotoxicity. IEC-HS was fatal in 2 of 3 patients. One patient had fatal IEC-HS and one had ongoing IEC-HS at time of death. IEC-HS is a life-threatening condition with a high mortality rate if not recognized and treated early. Treatment of IEC-HS should be administered per current practice guidelines.

Adverse Reactions

The most common adverse reactions (incidence ≥ 30%) in:

  • LBCL are fever, cytokine release syndrome, fatigue, musculoskeletal pain, and nausea. The most common Grade 3-4 laboratory abnormalities include lymphocyte count decrease, neutrophil count decrease, platelet count decrease, and hemoglobin decrease.
  • CLL/SLL are cytokine release syndrome, encephalopathy, fatigue, musculoskeletal pain, nausea, edema, and diarrhea. The most common Grade 3-4 laboratory abnormalities include neutrophil count decrease, white blood cell decrease, hemoglobin decrease, platelet count decrease, and lymphocyte count decrease.
  • FL are cytokine release syndrome. The most common Grade 3-4 laboratory abnormalities include lymphocyte count decreased, neutrophil count decreased, and white blood cell decrease.

Please see full Prescribing Information, including Boxed WARNINGS and Medication Guide.

REBLOZYL

REBLOZYL® (luspatercept-aamt) is indicated for the treatment of anemia without previous erythropoiesis stimulating agent use (ESA-naïve) in adult patients with very low- to intermediate-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) who may require regular red blood cell (RBC) transfusions.

REBLOZYL® (luspatercept-aamt) is indicated for the treatment of anemia failing an erythropoiesis stimulating agent and requiring 2 or more red blood cell (RBC) units over 8 weeks in adult patients with very low- to intermediate-risk myelodysplastic syndromes with ring sideroblasts (MDS-RS) or with myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasm with ring sideroblasts and thrombocytosis (MDS/MPN-RS-T).

REBLOZYL is not indicated for use as a substitute for RBC transfusions in patients who require immediate correction of anemia.

Important Safety Information

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Thrombosis/Thromboembolism

In adult patients with beta thalassemia, thromboembolic events (TEE) were reported in 8/223 (3.6%) of REBLOZYL-treated patients. TEEs included deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolus, portal vein thrombosis, and ischemic stroke. Patients with known risk factors for thromboembolism (splenectomy or concomitant use of hormone replacement therapy) may be at further increased risk of thromboembolic conditions. Consider thromboprophylaxis in patients at increased risk of TEE. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of thromboembolic events and institute treatment promptly.

Hypertension

Hypertension was reported in 11.4% (63/554) of REBLOZYL-treated patients. Across clinical studies, the incidence of Grade 3 to 4 hypertension ranged from 2% to 9.6%. In ESA-refractory or -intolerant adult patients with MDS with normal baseline blood pressure, 26 (30%) patients developed systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≥130 mm Hg and 23 (16%) patients developed diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ≥80 mm Hg. In ESA-naïve adult patients with MDS with normal baseline blood pressure, 23 (36%) patients developed SBP ≥140 mm Hg and 11 (6%) patients developed DBP ≥80 mm Hg. Monitor blood pressure prior to each administration. Manage new or exacerbations of preexisting hypertension using anti-hypertensive agents.

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity

REBLOZYL may cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. REBLOZYL caused increased post-implantation loss, decreased litter size, and an increased incidence of skeletal variations in pregnant rat and rabbit studies. Advise pregnant women of the potential risk to a fetus. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment and for at least 3 months after the final dose.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

ESA-naïve adult patients with Myelodysplastic Syndromes

Grade ≥3 (≥2%) adverse reactions included hypertension and dyspnea.

The most common (≥10%) all-grade adverse reactions included diarrhea, fatigue, hypertension, peripheral edema, nausea, and dyspnea.

ESA-refractory or -intolerant adult patients with Myelodysplastic Syndromes

Grade ≥3 (≥2%) adverse reactions included fatigue, hypertension, syncope and musculoskeletal pain. A fatal adverse reaction occurred in 5 (2.1%) patients.

The most common (≥10%) adverse reactions included fatigue, musculoskeletal pain, dizziness, diarrhea, nausea, hypersensitivity reactions, hypertension, headache, upper respiratory tract infection, bronchitis, and urinary tract infection.

LACTATION

It is not known whether REBLOZYL is excreted into human milk or absorbed systemically after ingestion by a nursing infant. REBLOZYL was detected in milk of lactating rats. When a drug is present in animal milk, it is likely that the drug will be present in human milk. Because many drugs are excreted in human milk, and because of the unknown effects of REBLOZYL in infants, a decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing or to discontinue treatment. Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in the breastfed child, breastfeeding is not recommended during treatment and for 3 months after the last dose.

DRUG ABUSE POTENTIAL

Abuse: Abuse of REBLOZYL may be seen in athletes for the effects on erythropoiesis. Misuse of drugs that increase erythropoiesis, such as REBLOZYL, by healthy persons may lead to polycythemia, which may be associated with life-threatening cardiovascular complications.

Please see U.S. Full Prescribing Information for REBLOZYL.

ABECMA

INDICATION

ABECMA (idecabtagene vicleucel) is a B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA)-directed genetically modified autologous T cell immunotherapy indicated for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma after two or more prior lines of therapy, including an immunomodulatory agent, a proteasome inhibitor, and an anti-CD38 monoclonal antibody.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

WARNING: CYTOKINE RELEASE SYNDROME, NEUROLOGIC TOXICITIES, HLH/MAS, PROLONGED CYTOPENIA and SECONDARY HEMATOLOGICAL MALIGNANCIES

  • Cytokine Release Syndrome (CRS), including fatal or life-threatening reactions, occurred in patients following treatment with ABECMA. Do not administer ABECMA to patients with active infection or inflammatory disorders. Treat severe or life-threatening CRS with tocilizumab or tocilizumab and corticosteroids.
  • Neurologic Toxicities, which may be severe or life-threatening, occurred following treatment with ABECMA, including concurrently with CRS, after CRS resolution, or in the absence of CRS. Monitor for neurologic events after treatment with ABECMA. Provide supportive care and/or corticosteroids as needed. Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis/Macrophage Activation Syndrome (HLH/MAS) including fatal and life-threatening reactions, occurred in patients following treatment with ABECMA. HLH/MAS can occur with CRS or neurologic toxicities. Prolonged Cytopenia with bleeding and infection, including fatal outcomes following stem cell transplantation for hematopoietic recovery, occurred following treatment with ABECMA.
  • T cell malignancies have occurred following treatment of hematologic malignancies with BCMA- and CD19-directed genetically modified autologous T cell immunotherapies, including ABECMA.
  • ABECMA is available only through a restricted program under a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) called the ABECMA REMS.

Warnings and Precautions:

Early Death:

In KarMMa-3, a randomized (2:1), controlled trial, a higher proportion of patients experienced death within 9 months after randomization in the ABECMA arm (45/254; 18%) compared to the standard regimens arm (15/132; 11%). Early deaths occurred in 8% (20/254) and 0% prior to ABECMA infusion and standard regimen administration, respectively, and 10% (25/254) and 11% (15/132) after ABECMA infusion and standard regimen administration, respectively. Out of the 20 deaths that occurred prior to ABECMA infusion, 15 occurred from disease progression, 3 occurred from adverse events and 2 occurred from unknown causes. Out of the 25 deaths that occurred after ABECMA infusion, 10 occurred from disease progression, 11 occurred from adverse events, and 4 occurred from unknown causes.

Cytokine Release Syndrome (CRS): CRS, including fatal or life-threatening reactions, occurred following treatment with ABECMA. Among patients receiving ABECMA for relapsed refractory multiple myeloma in the KarMMa and KarMMa-3 studies (N=349), CRS occurred in 89% (310/349), including ≥ Grade 3 CRS (Lee grading system) in 7% (23/349) of patients and Grade 5 CRS in 0.9% (3/349) of patients. The median time-to-onset of CRS, any grade, was 1 day (range: 1 to 27 days), and the median duration of CRS was 5 days (range: 1 to 63 days). In the pooled studies, the rate of ≥Grade 3 CRS was 10% (7/71) for patients treated in dose range of 460 to 510 x 106 CAR-positive T cells and 5.4% (13/241) for patients treated in dose range of 300 to 460 x 106 CAR-positive T cells. The most common manifestations of CRS (greater than or equal to 10%) included pyrexia (87%), hypotension (30%), tachycardia (26%), chills (19%), hypoxia (16%). Grade 3 or higher events that may be associated with CRS include hypotension, hypoxia, hyperbilirubinemia, hypofibrinogenemia, ARDS, atrial fibrillation, hepatocellular injury, metabolic acidosis, pulmonary edema, coagulopathy, renal failure, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and HLH/MAS.

Identify CRS based on clinical presentation. Evaluate for and treat other causes of fever, hypoxia, and hypotension. CRS has been reported to be associated with findings of HLH/MAS, and the physiology of the syndromes may overlap. HLH/MAS is a potentially life-threatening condition. In patients with progressive symptoms of CRS or refractory CRS despite treatment, evaluate for evidence of HLH/MAS.

Of the 349 patients who received ABECMA in clinical trials, 226 (65%) patients received tocilizumab; 39% (135/349) received a single dose, while 26% (91/349) received more than 1 dose of tocilizumab. Overall, 24% (82/349) of patients received at least 1 dose of corticosteroids for treatment of CRS. Almost all patients who received corticosteroids for CRS also received tocilizumab. For patients treated in dose range of 460 to 510 x 106 CAR-positive T cells, 76% (54/71) of patients received tocilizumab and 35% (25/71) received at least 1 dose of corticosteroids for treatment of CRS. For patients treated in dose range of 300 to 460 x 106 CAR-positive T cells, 63% (152/241) of patients received tocilizumab and 20% (49/241) received at least 1 dose of corticosteroid for treatment of CRS.

Monitor patients at least daily for 7 days following ABECMA infusion at the REMS-certified healthcare facility for signs or symptoms of CRS and monitor patients for signs or symptoms of CRS for at least 4 weeks after ABECMA infusion. At the first sign of CRS, institute treatment with supportive care, tocilizumab and/or corticosteroids as indicated. Ensure that a minimum of 2 doses of tocilizumab are available prior to infusion of ABECMA.

Counsel patients to seek immediate medical attention should signs or symptoms of CRS occur at any time.

Neurologic Toxicities: Neurologic toxicities, including immune-effector cell-associated neurotoxicity (ICANS), which may be severe or life-threatening, occurred concurrently with CRS, after CRS resolution, or in the absence of CRS following treatment with ABECMA. In patients receiving ABECMA in the KarMMa and KarMMa-3 studies, CAR T cell-associated neurotoxicity occurred in 40% (139/349), including Grade 3 in 4% (14/349) and Grade 4 in 0.6% (2/349) of patients. The median time to onset of neurotoxicity was 2 days (range: 1 to 148 days). The median duration of CAR T cell-associated neurotoxicity was 8 days (range: 1 to 720 days) in all patients including those with ongoing neurologic events at the time of death or data cut off. CAR T cell-associated neurotoxicity resolved in 123 of 139 (88%) patients and median time to resolution was 5 days (range: 1 to 245 days). One-hundred and thirty four out of 349 (38%) patients with neurotoxicity had CRS. The onset of neurotoxicity during CRS was observed in 93 patients, before the onset of CRS in 12 patients, and after the CRS event in 29 patients. The rate of Grade 3 or 4 CAR T cell-associated neurotoxicity was 5.6% (4/71) and 3.7% (9/241) for patients treated in dose range of 460 to 510 x 106 CAR-positive T cells and 300 to 460 x 106 CAR-positive T cells, respectively. The most frequent (greater than or equal to 5%) manifestations of CAR T cell-associated neurotoxicity include encephalopathy (21%), headache (15%), dizziness (8%), delirium (6%), and tremor (6%).

At the safety update for KarMMa-3 study, one patient developed fatal neurotoxicity 43 days after ABECMA. In KarMMa, one patient had ongoing Grade 2 neurotoxicity at the time of death. Two patients had ongoing Grade 1 tremor at the time of data cutoff.

Cerebral edema has been associated with ABECMA in a patient in another study in multiple myeloma. Grade 3 myelitis and Grade 3 parkinsonism have occurred after treatment with ABECMA in another study in multiple myeloma.

Monitor patients at least daily for 7 days following ABECMA infusion at the REMS-certified healthcare facility for signs or symptoms of neurologic toxicities and monitor patients for signs or symptoms of neurologic toxicities for at least 4 weeks after ABECMA infusion and treat promptly. Rule out other causes of neurologic symptoms. Neurologic toxicity should be managed with supportive care and/or corticosteroids as needed. Counsel patients to seek immediate medical attention should signs or symptoms occur at any time.

Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis (HLH)/Macrophage Activation Syndrome (MAS): In patients receiving ABECMA in the KarMMa and KarMMa-3 studies, HLH/MAS occurred in 2.9% (10/349) of patients. All events of HLH/MAS had onset within 10 days of receiving ABECMA, with a median onset of 6.5 days (range: 4 to 10 days) and occurred in the setting of ongoing or worsening CRS. Five patients with HLH/MAS had overlapping neurotoxicity. The manifestations of HLH/MAS include hypotension, hypoxia, multiple organ dysfunction, renal dysfunction and cytopenia.

In KarMMa-3, one patient had Grade 5, two patients had Grade 4 and two patients had Grade 3 HLH/MAS. The patient with Grade 5 HLH/MAS also had Grade 5 candida sepsis and Grade 5 CRS. In another patient who died due to stroke, the Grade 4 HLH/MAS had resolved prior to death. Two cases of Grade 3 and one case of Grade 4 HLH/MAS had resolved.

In KarMMa, one patient treated in the 300 x 106 CAR-positive T cells dose cohort developed fatal multi-organ HLH/MAS with CRS. In another patient with fatal bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, HLH/MAS was contributory to the fatal outcome. Three cases of Grade 2 HLH/MAS resolved.

HLH/MAS is a potentially life-threatening condition with a high mortality rate if not recognized early and treated. Treatment of HLH/MAS should be administered per institutional guidelines.

ABECMA REMS: Due to the risk of CRS and neurologic toxicities, ABECMA is available only through a restricted program under a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) called the ABECMA REMS. Further information is available at www.AbecmaREMS.com or contact Bristol-Myers Squibb at 1-866-340-7332.

Hypersensitivity Reactions: Allergic reactions may occur with the infusion of ABECMA. Serious hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis, may be due to dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) in ABECMA.

Infections: ABECMA should not be administered to patients with active infections or inflammatory disorders. Severe, life-threatening, or fatal infections occurred in patients after ABECMA infusion.

In all patients receiving ABECMA in the KarMMa and KarMMa-3 studies, infections (all grades) occurred in 61% of patients. Grade 3 or 4 infections occurred in 21% of patients. Grade 3 or 4 infections with an unspecified pathogen occurred in 12%, viral infections in 7%, bacterial infections in 4.3%, and fungal infections in 1.4% of patients. Overall, 15 patients had Grade 5 infections (4.3%); 8 patients (2.3%) with infections of pathogen unspecified, 3 patients (0.9%) with fungal infections, 3 patients (0.9%) with viral infections, and 1 patient (0.3%) with bacterial infection.

Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of infection before and after ABECMA infusion and treat appropriately. Administer prophylactic, pre-emptive, and/or therapeutic antimicrobials according to standard institutional guidelines.

Febrile neutropenia was observed in 38% (133/349) of patients after ABECMA infusion and may be concurrent with CRS. In the event of febrile neutropenia, evaluate for infection and manage with broad-spectrum antibiotics, fluids, and other supportive care as medically indicated.

Viral Reactivation: Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection resulting in pneumonia and death has occurred following ABECMA administration. Monitor and treat for CMV reactivation in accordance with clinical guidelines. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation, in some cases resulting in fulminant hepatitis, hepatic failure, and death, can occur in patients treated with drugs directed against plasma cells. Perform screening for CMV, HBV, hepatitis C virus (HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in accordance with clinical guidelines before collection of cells for manufacturing. Consider antiviral therapy to prevent viral reactivation per local institutional guidelines/clinical practice.

Prolonged Cytopenias: In patients receiving ABECMA in the KarMMa and KarMMa-3 studies, 40% of patients (139/349) experienced prolonged Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia and 42% (145/349) experienced prolonged Grade 3 or 4 thrombocytopenia that had not resolved by Month 1 following ABECMA infusion. In 89% (123/139) of patients who recovered from Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia after Month 1, the median time to recovery from ABECMA infusion was 1.9 months. In 76% (110/145) of patients who recovered from Grade 3 or 4 thrombocytopenia, the median time to recovery was 1.9 months. Five patients underwent stem cell therapy for hematopoietic reconstitution due to prolonged cytopenia. The rate of Grade 3 or 4 thrombocytopenia was 62% (44/71) and 56% (135/241) for patients treated in dose range of 460 to 510 x 106 CAR-positive T cells and 300 to 460 x 106 CAR-positive T cells, respectively.

Monitor blood counts prior to and after ABECMA infusion. Manage cytopenia with myeloid growth factor and blood product transfusion support according to local institutional guidelines.

Hypogammaglobulinemia: In all patients receiving ABECMA in the KarMMa and KarMMa-3 studies, hypogammaglobulinemia was reported as an adverse event in 13% (46/349) of patients; laboratory IgG levels fell below 500 mg/dL after infusion in 37% (130/349) of patients treated with ABECMA.

Hypogammaglobulinemia either as an adverse reaction or laboratory IgG level below 500 mg/dL after infusion occurred in 45% (158/349) of patients treated with ABECMA. Forty-one percent of patients received intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) post-ABECMA for serum IgG <400 mg/dL.

Monitor immunoglobulin levels after treatment with ABECMA and administer IVIG for IgG <400 mg/dl. Manage appropriately per local institutional guidelines, including infection precautions and antibiotic or antiviral prophylaxis.

Use of Live Vaccines: The safety of immunization with live viral vaccines during or after ABECMA treatment has not been studied. Vaccination with live virus vaccines is not recommended for at least 6 weeks prior to the start of lymphodepleting chemotherapy, during ABECMA treatment, and until immune recovery following treatment with ABECMA.

Secondary Malignancies: Patients treated with ABECMA may develop secondary malignancies. In KarMMa-3, myeloid neoplasms (four cases of myelodysplastic syndrome and one case of acute myeloid leukemia) occurred in 2.2% (5/222) of patients following treatment with ABECMA compared to none in the standard regimens arm at the time of the safety update. The median time to onset of myeloid neoplasm from ide-cel infusion was 338 days (Range: 277 to 794 days). Three of these five patients have died following the development of myeloid neoplasm. One out of the five cases of myeloid neoplasm occurred after initiation of subsequent antimyeloma therapy.

T cell malignancies have occurred following treatment of hematologic malignancies with BCMA- and CD19-directed genetically modified autologous T cell immunotherapies, including ABECMA. Mature T cell malignancies, including CAR-positive tumors, may present as soon as weeks following infusion, and may include fatal outcomes.

Monitor life-long for secondary malignancies. In the event that a secondary malignancy occurs, contact Bristol-Myers Squibb at 1-888-805-4555 for reporting and to obtain instructions on collection of patient samples for testing of secondary malignancy.

Effects on Ability to Drive and Operate Machinery: Due to the potential for neurologic events, including altered mental status or seizures, patients receiving ABECMA are at risk for altered or decreased consciousness or coordination in the 8 weeks following ABECMA infusion. Advise patients to refrain from driving and engaging in hazardous occupations or activities, such as operating heavy or potentially dangerous machinery, during this initial period.

Adverse Reactions: The most common nonlaboratory adverse reactions (incidence greater than or equal to 20%) include pyrexia, CRS, hypogammaglobulinemia, infections - pathogen unspecified, musculoskeletal pain, fatigue, febrile neutropenia, hypotension, tachycardia, diarrhea, nausea, headache, chills, upper respiratory tract infection, encephalopathy, edema, dyspnea and viral infections.

Please see full Prescribing Information, including Boxed WARNINGS and Medication Guide.

INREBIC

INDICATION

INREBIC® (fedratinib) is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with intermediate-2 or high-risk primary or secondary (post-polycythemia vera or post-essential thrombocythemia) myelofibrosis (MF).

U.S. IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

WARNING: ENCEPHALOPATHY INCLUDING WERNICKE’S

Serious and fatal encephalopathy, including Wernicke’s, has occurred in patients treated with INREBIC. Wernicke’s encephalopathy is a neurologic emergency. Assess thiamine levels in all patients prior to starting INREBIC, periodically during treatment, and as clinically indicated. Do not start INREBIC in patients with thiamine deficiency; replete thiamine prior to treatment initiation. If encephalopathy is suspected, immediately discontinue INREBIC and initiate parenteral thiamine. Monitor until symptoms resolve or improve and thiamine levels normalize.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Encephalopathy, including Wernicke’s: Serious and fatal encephalopathy, including Wernicke’s encephalopathy, has occurred in INREBIC-treated patients. Serious cases were reported in 1.3% (8/608) of patients treated with INREBIC in clinical trials and 0.16% (1/608) of cases were fatal.

Wernicke’s encephalopathy is a neurologic emergency resulting from thiamine (Vitamin B1) deficiency. Signs and symptoms of Wernicke’s encephalopathy may include ataxia, mental status changes, and ophthalmoplegia (e.g., nystagmus, diplopia). Any change in mental status, confusion, or memory impairment should raise concern for potential encephalopathy, including Wernicke’s, and prompt a full evaluation including a neurologic examination, assessment of thiamine levels, and imaging. Assess thiamine levels in all patients prior to starting INREBIC, periodically during treatment, and as clinically indicated. Do not start INREBIC in patients with thiamine deficiency; replete thiamine prior to treatment initiation. If encephalopathy is suspected, immediately discontinue INREBIC and initiate parenteral thiamine. Monitor until symptoms resolve or improve and thiamine levels normalize.

Anemia: New or worsening Grade 3 anemia occurred in 34% of INREBIC-treated patients. The median time to onset of the first Grade 3 anemia was approximately 2 months, with 75% of cases occurring within 3 months. Mean hemoglobin levels reached nadir after 12 to 16 weeks with partial recovery and stabilization after 16 weeks. Red blood cell transfusions were received by 51% of INREBIC-treated patients and permanent discontinuation of INREBIC occurred due to anemia in 1% of patients. Consider dose reduction for patients who become red blood cell transfusion dependent.

Thrombocytopenia: New or worsening Grade ≥3 thrombocytopenia during the randomized treatment period occurred in 12% of INREBIC-treated patients. The median time to onset of the first Grade 3 thrombocytopenia was approximately 1 month; with 75% of cases occurring within 4 months. Platelet transfusions were received by 3.1% of INREBIC-treated patients. Permanent discontinuation of treatment due to thrombocytopenia and bleeding that required clinical intervention both occurred in 2.1% of INREBIC-treated patients. Obtain a complete blood count (CBC) at baseline, periodically during treatment, and as clinically indicated. For Grade 3 thrombocytopenia with active bleeding or Grade 4 thrombocytopenia, interrupt INREBIC until resolved to less than or equal to Grade 2 or baseline. Restart dose at 100 mg daily below the last given dose and monitor platelets as clinically indicated.

Gastrointestinal Toxicity: Gastrointestinal toxicities are the most frequent adverse reactions in INREBIC-treated patients. During the randomized treatment period, diarrhea occurred in 66% of patients, nausea in 62% of patients, and vomiting in 39% of patients. Grade 3 diarrhea 5% and vomiting 3.1% occurred. The median time to onset of any grade nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea was 1 day, with 75% of cases occurring within 2 weeks of treatment. Consider providing appropriate prophylactic anti-emetic therapy (e.g., 5-HT3 receptor antagonists) during INREBIC treatment. Treat diarrhea with anti-diarrheal medications promptly at the first onset of symptoms. Grade 3 or higher nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea not responsive to supportive measures within 48 hours, interrupt INREBIC until resolved to Grade 1 or less or baseline. Restart dose at 100 mg daily below the last given dose. Monitor thiamine levels and replete as needed.

Hepatic Toxicity: Elevations of ALT and AST (all grades) during the randomized treatment period occurred in 43% and 40%, respectively, with Grade 3 or 4 in 1% and 0%, respectively, of INREBIC-treated patients. The median time to onset of any grade transaminase elevation was approximately 1 month, with 75% of cases occurring within 3 months. Monitor hepatic function at baseline, periodically during treatment, and as clinically indicated. For Grade 3 or higher ALT and/or AST elevations (greater than 5 × ULN), interrupt INREBIC dose until resolved to Grade 1 or less or to baseline. Restart dose at 100 mg daily below the last given dose. If re-occurrence of a Grade 3 or higher elevation of ALT/AST, discontinue treatment with INREBIC.

Amylase and Lipase Elevation: Grade 3 or higher amylase 2% and/or lipase 10% elevations developed in INREBIC-treated patients. The median time to onset of any grade amylase or lipase elevation was 15 days, with 75% of cases occurring within 1 month of starting treatment. One patient developed pancreatitis in the fedratinib clinical development program (n=608) and pancreatitis resolved with treatment discontinuation. Monitor amylase and lipase at baseline, periodically during treatment, and as clinically indicated. For Grade 3 or higher amylase and/or lipase elevations, interrupt INREBIC until resolved to Grade 1 or less or to baseline. Restart dose at 100 mg daily below the last given dose.

ADVERSE REACTIONS:

The most common adverse reactions for INREBIC treated vs. placebo were diarrhea (66% vs. 16%), nausea (62% vs. 15%), anemia (40% vs. 14%), and vomiting (39% vs. 5%). Dosage interruptions due to an adverse reaction during the randomized treatment period occurred in 21% of patients who received INREBIC. Adverse reactions requiring dosage interruption in >3% of patients who received INREBIC included diarrhea and nausea. Dosage reductions due to an adverse reaction during the randomized treatment period occurred in 19% of patients who received INREBIC. Adverse reactions requiring dosage reduction in >2% of patients who received INREBIC included anemia (6%), diarrhea (3%), vomiting (3%), and thrombocytopenia (2%).

DRUG INTERACTIONS:

Coadministration of INREBIC with a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor increases fedratinib exposure. Increased exposure may increase the risk of adverse reactions. Consider alternative therapies that do not strongly inhibit CYP3A4 activity. Alternatively, reduce the dose of INREBIC when administering with a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor. Avoid INREBIC with strong and moderate CYP3A4 inducers. Avoid INREBIC with dual CYP3A4 and CYP2C19 inhibitor. Coadministration of INREBIC with drugs that are CYP3A4 substrates, CYP2C19 substrates, or CYP2D6 substrates increases the concentrations of these drugs, which may increase the risk of adverse reactions of these drugs. Monitor for adverse reactions and adjust the dose of drugs that are CYP3A4, CYP2C19, or CYP2D6 substrates as necessary when coadministered with INREBIC.

PREGNANCY/LACTATION: Consider the benefits and risks of INREBIC for the mother and possible risks to the fetus when prescribing INREBIC to a pregnant woman. Due to the potential for serious adverse reactions in a breastfed child, advise patients not to breastfeed during treatment with INREBIC, and for at least 1 month after the last dose.

RENAL IMPAIRMENT: Reduce INREBIC dose when administered to patients with severe renal impairment. No modification of the starting dose is recommended for patients with mild to moderate renal impairment. Due to potential increase of exposure, patients with preexisting moderate renal impairment require more intensive safety monitoring, and if necessary, dose modifications based on adverse reactions.

HEPATIC IMPAIRMENT: Avoid use of INREBIC in patients with severe hepatic impairment.

Please see full Prescribing Information, including Boxed WARNING, and Summary of Product Characteristics for INREBIC.

AUGTYRO

Augtyro (TPX-0005, BMS-986472) is a next-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) targeting ROS1-positive or NTRK-positive locally advanced or metastatic solid tumors, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), where there remain significant unmet medical needs for patients. Augtyro was designed to improve durability of response and with favorable properties for human brain penetration to enhance intracranial activity. It is being studied in a registrational Phase 1/2 trial in adults (TRIDENT-1) and a Phase 1/2 trial in pediatric patients (CARE).

Augtyro has demonstrated clinically meaningful results and was granted three Breakthrough Therapy Designations (BTDs) by the FDA for the treatment of patients with: ROS1-positive metastatic NSCLC who have not been treated with a ROS1 TKI; ROS1-positive metastatic NSCLC who have been previously treated with one ROS1 TKI and who have not received prior platinum-based chemotherapy; and advanced solid tumors that have an NTRK gene fusion who have progressed following treatment with one or two prior tropomyosin receptor kinase (TRK) TKIs (with or without prior chemotherapy) and have no satisfactory alternative treatments.

Augtyro was also previously granted four fast-track designations in patients with: ROS1-positive advanced NSCLC who have been treated with disease progression following one prior line of platinum-based chemotherapy and one prior line of a ROS1 TKI; ROS1-positive advanced NSCLC who have not been treated with a ROS1 TKI; ROS1-positive advanced NSCLC who have been previously treated with one ROS1 TKI and who have not received prior platinum-based chemotherapy; and advanced solid tumors that have an NTRK gene fusion who have progressed following treatment with at least one prior line of chemotherapy and one or two prior TRK TKIs and have no satisfactory alternative treatments. Augtyro was also granted an Orphan Drug designation by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

INDICATION

AUGTYROTM (repotrectinib) is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with locally advanced or metastatic ROS1-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Warnings & Precautions

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Central Nervous System Adverse Reactions

  • Among the 351 patients who received AUGTYRO in the TRIDENT-1 study, a broad spectrum of central nervous system (CNS) adverse reactions including dizziness, ataxia, and cognitive disorders occurred in 75% with Grade 3 or 4 events occurring in 4%. Dizziness, including vertigo, occurred in 64% and Grade 3 dizziness occurred in 2.8% of patients. The median time to onset was 6 days (1 day to 1.4 years). Dose interruption was required in 9% of patients, and 12% required dose reduction of AUGTYRO due to dizziness.
  • Ataxia, including gait disturbance and balance disorder, occurred in 29% of the 351 patients; Grade 3 ataxia occurred in 0.3%. The median time to onset was 15 days (1 day to 1.4 years). Dose interruption was required in 6% of patients, 8% required dose reduction and one patient (0.3%) permanently discontinued AUGTYRO due to ataxia.
  • Cognitive disorder, including memory impairment and disturbance in attention, occurred in 23% of the 351 patients. Cognitive disorders included memory impairment (13%), disturbance in attention (11%), and confusional state (2%); Grade 3 cognitive disorders occurred in 0.9% of patients. The median time to onset of cognitive disorders was 37 days (1 day to 1.4 years). Dose interruption was required in 2% of patients, 1.7% required dose reduction and 0.6% permanently discontinued AUGTYRO due to cognitive adverse reactions.
  • Mood disorders occurred in 6% of the 351 patients. Mood disorders occurring in >1% of patients included anxiety (2.8%), irritability (1.1%), and depression (1.4%); Grade 4 mood disorders (mania) occurred in 0.3% of patients. Dose interruption was required in 0.3% of patients and 0.3% required a dose reduction due to mood disorders.
  • Sleep disorders including insomnia and hypersomnia occurred in 15% of the 351 patients. Sleep disorders observed in >1% of patients were somnolence (8%), insomnia (6%) and hypersomnia (1.1%). Dose interruption was required in 0.9% of patients, and 0.3% required a dose reduction due to sleep disorders.
  • The incidences of CNS adverse reactions reported were similar in patients with and without CNS metastases.
  • Advise patients not to drive or use machines if they are experiencing CNS adverse reactions. Withhold and then resume at same or reduced dose upon improvement, or permanently discontinue AUGTYRO based on severity.

Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD)/Pneumonitis

  • Among the 351 patients treated with AUGTYRO, ILD/pneumonitis (pneumonitis [2.6%] and interstitial lung disease [0.3%]) occurred in 2.9%; Grade 3 ILD/pneumonitis occurred in 1.1%. The median time to onset was 45 days (19 days to 0.9 years). Dose interruption was required in 1.4% of patients, 0.6% required dose reduction, and 1.1% permanently discontinued AUGTYRO due to ILD/pneumonitis.
  • Monitor patients for new or worsening pulmonary symptoms indicative of ILD/pneumonitis. Immediately withhold AUGTYRO in patients with suspected ILD/pneumonitis and permanently discontinue AUGTYRO if ILD/pneumonitis is confirmed.

Hepatotoxicity

  • Among the 351 patients treated with AUGTYRO, increased alanine transaminase (ALT) occurred in 35%, increased aspartate aminotransferase (AST) occurred in 40%, including Grade 3 or 4 increased ALT in 2% and increased AST in 2.6%. The median time to onset of increased ALT or AST was 15 days (range: 1 day to 1.9 years). Increased ALT or AST leading to dose interruptions or reductions occurred in 2.8% and 1.4% of patients, respectively. Hyperbilirubinemia leading to dose interruptions occurred in 0.6%.
  • Monitor liver function tests, including ALT, AST and bilirubin, every 2 weeks during the first month of treatment, then monthly thereafter and as clinically indicated. Withhold and then resume at same or reduced dose upon improvement or permanently discontinue AUGTYRO based on the severity.

Myalgia with Creatine Phosphokinase (CPK) Elevation

  • Among the 351 patients treated with AUGTYRO, myalgia occurred in 13% of patients, with Grade 3 in 0.6%. Median time to onset of myalgia was 19 days (range: 1 day to 2 years). Concurrent increased CPK within a 7-day window was observed in 3.7% of patients. AUGTYRO was interrupted in one patient with myalgia and concurrent CPK elevation.
  • Advise patients to report any unexplained muscle pain, tenderness, or weakness. Monitor serum CPK levels during AUGTYRO treatment and monitor CPK levels every 2 weeks during the first month of treatment and as needed in patients reporting unexplained muscle pain, tenderness, or weakness. Initiate supportive care as clinically indicated. Based on severity, withhold and then resume AUGTYRO at same or reduced dose upon improvement.

Hyperuricemia

  • Among the 351 patients treated with AUGTYRO, 18 patients (5%) experienced hyperuricemia reported as an adverse reaction, 0.9% experienced Grade 3 or 4 hyperuricemia. One patient without pre-existing gout required urate-lowering medication.
  • Monitor serum uric acid levels prior to initiating AUGTYRO and periodically during treatment. Initiate treatment with urate-lowering medications as clinically indicated. Withhold and then resume at same or reduced dose upon improvement, or permanently discontinue AUGTYRO based on severity.

Skeletal Fractures

  • Among 351 adult patients who received AUGTYRO, fractures occurred in 2.3%. Fractures involved the ribs (0.6%), feet (0.6%), spine (0.3%), acetabulum (0.3%), sternum (0.3%), and ankles (0.3%). Some fractures occurred at sites of disease and prior radiation therapy. The median time to fracture was 71 days (range: 31 days to 1.4 years). AUGTYRO was interrupted in 0.3% of patients.
  • Promptly evaluate patients with signs or symptoms (e.g., pain, changes in mobility, deformity) of fractures. There are no data on the effects of AUGTYRO on healing of known fractures and risk of future fractures.

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity

  • Based on literature reports in humans with congenital mutations leading to changes in tropomyosin receptor tyrosine kinase (TRK) signaling, findings from animal studies, and its mechanism of action, AUGTYRO can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman.
  • Advise pregnant women of the potential risk to a fetus. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective non-hormonal contraception during treatment with AUGTYRO and for 2 months following the last dose, since AUGTYRO can render some hormonal contraceptives ineffective.
  • Advise male patients with female partners of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with AUGTYRO and for 4 months after the last dose.

Adverse Reactions

  • Among 351 patients who received AUGTYRO for ROS1-positive NSCLC and other solid tumors in the TRIDENT-1 trial, the most common (>20%) adverse reactions were dizziness (64%), dysgeusia (50%), peripheral neuropathy (47%), constipation (37%), dyspnea (30%), ataxia (29%), fatigue (29%), cognitive disorders (23%), and nausea (20%).
  • In a subset of 264 patients who received AUGTYRO for ROS1-positive NSCLC, the most common (≥20%) adverse reactions were dizziness (63%), dysgeusia (48%), peripheral neuropathy (47%), constipation (36%), dyspnea (30%), ataxia (28%), fatigue (24%), cognitive disorders (23%), and muscular weakness (21%).

Drug Interactions

Effects of Other Drugs on AUGTYRO

Strong and Moderate CYP3A Inhibitors

  • Avoid concomitant use with strong or moderate CYP3A inhibitors. Concomitant use of AUGTYRO with a strong or a moderate CYP3A inhibitor may increase repotrectinib exposure, which may increase the incidence and severity of adverse reactions of AUGTYRO. Discontinue CYP3A inhibitors for 3 to 5 elimination half-lives of the CYP3A inhibitor prior to initiating AUGTYRO.

P-gp Inhibitors

  • Avoid concomitant use with P-gp inhibitors. Concomitant use of AUGTYRO with a P-gp inhibitor may increase repotrectinib exposure, which may increase the incidence and severity of adverse reactions of AUGTYRO.

Strong and Moderate CYP3A Inducers

  • Avoid concomitant use with strong or moderate CYP3A inducers. Concomitant use of AUGTYRO with a strong or moderate CYP3A inducer may decrease repotrectinib plasma concentrations, which may decrease efficacy of AUGTYRO.

Effects of AUGTYRO on other Drugs

Certain CYP3A4 Substrates

  • Avoid concomitant use unless otherwise recommended in the Prescribing Information for CYP3A substrates, where minimal concentration changes can cause reduced efficacy. If concomitant use is unavoidable, increase the CYP3A4 substrate dosage in accordance with approved product labeling.
  • Repotrectinib is a CYP3A4 inducer. Concomitant use of repotrectinib decreases the concentration of CYP3A4 substrates, which can reduce the efficacy of these substrates.

Contraceptives

  • Repotrectinib is a CYP3A4 inducer, which can decrease progestin or estrogen exposure to an extent that could reduce the effectiveness of hormonal contraceptives.
  • Avoid concomitant use of AUGTYRO with hormonal contraceptives. Advise females to use an effective nonhormonal contraceptive.

Please see U.S. Full Prescribing Information for AUGTYRO.

About the Bristol Myers Squibb and Ono Pharmaceutical Collaboration

In 2011, through a collaboration agreement with Ono Pharmaceutical Co., Bristol Myers Squibb expanded its territorial rights to develop and commercialize Opdivo globally, except in Japan, South Korea and Taiwan, where Ono had retained all rights to the compound at the time. On July 23, 2014, Ono and Bristol Myers Squibb further expanded the companies’ strategic collaboration agreement to jointly develop and commercialize multiple immunotherapies - as single agents and combination regimens - for patients with cancer in Japan, South Korea and Taiwan.

About Bristol Myers Squibb and 2seventy bio

Abecma is being jointly developed and commercialized in the U.S. as part of a Co-Development, Co-Promotion, and Profit Share Agreement between Bristol Myers Squibb and 2seventy bio. Bristol Myers Squibb assumes sole responsibility for Abecma drug product manufacturing and commercialization outside of the U.S. The companies’ broad clinical development program for Abecma includes ongoing and planned clinical studies (KarMMa-2, KarMMa-3, KarMMa-9) for patients with multiple myeloma. For more information visit clinicaltrials.gov.

About Bristol Myers Squibb

Bristol Myers Squibb is a global biopharmaceutical company whose mission is to discover, develop and deliver innovative medicines that help patients prevail over serious diseases. For more information about Bristol Myers Squibb, visit us at BMS.com or follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook and Instagram.

Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

This press release contains “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 regarding, among other things, the research, development and commercialization of pharmaceutical products. All statements that are not statements of historical facts are, or may be deemed to be, forward-looking statements. Such forward-looking statements are based on current expectations and projections about our future financial results, goals, plans and objectives and involve inherent risks, assumptions and uncertainties, including internal or external factors that could delay, divert or change any of them in the next several years, that are difficult to predict, may be beyond our control and could cause our future financial results, goals, plans and objectives to differ materially from those expressed in, or implied by, the statements. These risks, assumptions, uncertainties and other factors include, among others, that future study results may not be consistent with the results to date, that the treatments and combination treatments may not receive regulatory approval for the indications described in this release will be commercially successful, and any marketing approvals, if granted, may have significant limitations on their use, and, if approved, whether the treatments and combination treatments for such indications described in this release will be commercially successful. No forward-looking statement can be guaranteed. Forward-looking statements in this press release should be evaluated together with the many risks and uncertainties that affect Bristol Myers Squibb’s business and market, particularly those identified in the cautionary statement and risk factors discussion in Bristol Myers Squibb’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2023, as updated by our subsequent Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K and other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The forward-looking statements included in this document are made only as of the date of this document and except as otherwise required by applicable law, Bristol Myers Squibb undertakes no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future events, changed circumstances or otherwise.

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