Why a Life Sciences Career Can Be Life-Changing

Career advancement

Whether you’re trying to decide what major to select along your college entrance path or simply looking for something new and different to spice up your life with a career change, there is a life science career waiting for you. With so many professions fizzling out as the world and technology rapidly continue to advance, finding the right career that offers a stable future is crucial. Fortunately, the life sciences offer just that for individuals in all realms of their career journey. No matter what stage you’re entering in your professional career, life sciences offer endless opportunities, job satisfaction and security, and competitive pay, making the switch a great career move you don’t want to miss out on.

What Potential Does a Life Science Career Hold for Me?

Ask yourself, “What is my passion?” If you dream of making a difference in the world by developing a life-saving vaccine or medication, or maintaining the quality of foods to prevent widespread illnesses, or pushing society into the future with breakthroughs in technology, a career in life sciences would afford you all these opportunities.

Life sciences are usually at the forefront of scientific breakthroughs in medicine, but they have also held crucial roles in other fields, such as agriculture and food protection, for hundreds of years. Because there’s always been a general need for the study of life sciences as they push and advance our society further every day, it creates new demands for innovative individuals to keep the momentum, lending a hand to a plethora of job security for those with a career in life science.

What Job Opportunities Are Available?

With so many possibilities across dozens of fields, there is something for everyone. A couple of the most common careers in life sciences include biochemists, clinical research associates, research assistants, and microbiologists. Other lesser-known, yet still important, career options include biomedical scientist, biotechnologist, computational biologist, industrial pharmacist, and bioinformatician. Interested in learning more already? Most of the life science careers predominantly reside in the medical field; however, jobs like computational biologist can span across many other fields, including computer science and ecology, making it the Swiss army knife of life science careers.

If you’re interested in the medical field, choosing a career as a biomedical scientist is your best choice. Their duties include examining tissue samples and aiding and advising medical doctors in diagnosing and treating their patients. In order to be a biomedical scientist, you must have extensive knowledge in pathology, anatomy, and physiology. Other life science careers that are heavily involved in the medical field include industrial pharmacist and clinical research associate. An industrial pharmacist is responsible for developing safe, effective medications and getting them on the market. They may be involved at any stage of the process, whether that be discovery, running clinical trials, or effectively marketing the drug. Clinical research associates are somewhat similar, as they oversee clinical trials of medications, vaccines, and treatments to ensure they work safely and effectively.

Not sure if a career in the medical, agriculture, ecology, or computer science field is the right fit for you? Turn to biotechnology, biochemistry, computational biology, or microbiology. Each of these crosses a vast array of fields, giving you plenty of diverse options when it comes to your work environment. These scientists are responsible for monitoring everything from food production, to environmental issues, to computer sciences, to neuroscientific discoveries. The possibilities are plentiful.

How Do I Get Started?

In order to achieve your dream of landing a job in one of the many life science fields, you first must obtain a degree that is relevant to your career choice.

Ready to take the first step? Talking to a counselor at a university is a great way to get started. Career counselors can help guide you and determine the course of study that best suits both your interests and needs. Most individuals who choose life science careers start with a bachelor’s degree in biology, chemistry, life science, pharmacy, or computer science and then continue their education by securing a master’s degree with a more specific focus, such as industrial pharmacy or biochemistry. Start small, and dream with a career in life science!

For more information on specific careers in the life sciences, check out some of these great articles:

Clinical Study Coordinator – The Perfect Transitional Life Science Career

Medical Science Liaison Jobs: The Best-Kept Secret in the Life Sciences Industry

Honest Tips on Breaking Into the Biomechanical Engineering Market

Tips and Trends in Biochemical Engineering

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