Radiological Society of North America (RSNA)

820 Jorie Boulevard
Oak Brook
Illinois
60523-2251
United States

Tel: 630-571-2670
Fax: 630-571-7837

Show jobs for this employer

229 articles with Radiological Society of North America (RSNA)

  • Automated deep learning analysis of abdominal CT images produces a more precise measurement of body composition and predicts major cardiovascular events, such as heart attack and stroke, better than overall weight or body mass index, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America.

  • Up to one-third of adult women who sustain a non-displaced fracture to the ulna bone of the forearm may be victims of intimate partner violence, according to a study being presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America.

  • Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital have developed a deep learning model that identifies imaging biomarkers on screening mammograms to predict a patient's risk for developing breast cancer with greater accuracy than traditional risk assessment tools.

  • Advanced imaging with CT shows that people who cook with biomass fuels like wood are at risk of suffering considerable damage to their lungs from breathing in dangerous concentrations of pollutants and bacterial toxins, according to a study being presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America.

  • Company to present 11 abstracts at RSNA 2020, consisted of studies that feature its AI solution for chest x-ray and mammography analysis

  • Anxiety is associated with an increased rate of progression from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer's disease, according to a study being presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America.

  • In response to the critical shortage of nasopharyngeal swabs early in the COVID-19 pandemic, the Department of Radiology at University of South Florida Health in Tampa set out to design, validate and create NP swabs using a point-of-care 3D printer.

  • A simple eye exam combined with powerful artificial intelligence machine learning technology could provide early detection of Parkinson's disease, according to research being presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America.

  • Women who experience food or housing insecurity may be at risk for undiagnosed breast cancer due to lapses in follow-up appointments, according to research being presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America.

  • Some patients with COVID-19 are at higher risk of neurological complications like bleeding in the brain and stroke, according to a study being presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America.

  • Racket sports like tennis and racquetball appear to accelerate knee joint degeneration in overweight people with osteoarthritis, according to a study being presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America.

  • A novel outpatient procedure offers lasting pain relief for patients suffering from moderate to severe arthritis in their hip and shoulder joints, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America.

  • Awards presented during cocktail reception sponsored by Ambra Health at the annual RSNA conference.

  • Researchers studying the brain found that women taking oral contraceptives, commonly known as birth control pills, had significantly smaller hypothalamus volume, compared to women not taking the pill, according to a new study presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America.

  • The use of high-dose-rate brachytherapy to treat elderly patients with common skin cancers offers excellent cure rates and cosmetic outcomes, according to a new study presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America.

  • More than half of people who received X-rays or CT scans after electric scooter accidents were found to have injuries, most commonly to the upper extremities, according to a new study presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America.

  • MRI illuminates abnormalities in the brains of people with depression, potentially opening the door to new and improved treatments for the disorder, according to two studies presented this week at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America.

  • Focused ultrasound is a safe and effective way to target and open areas of the blood-brain barrier, potentially allowing for new treatment approaches to Alzheimer's disease, according to initial study results presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America.

  • Damage from concussion alters the way information is transmitted between the two halves of the brain, according to a new study presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America.

  • Artificial intelligence provides an automated and accurate tool to measure a common marker of heart disease in patients getting chest CT scans for lung cancer screening, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America.