Hurricane Warning: Survey Reveals Healthcare Organizations Doubt Their Disaster Plans are Up to the Task

 

ROCKVILLE, Md., /PRNewswire/ -- As Hurricane Florence hurtles toward the East Coast, a new survey reveals that only slightly more than half of healthcare providers believe their organization's disaster plan is comprehensive enough to cover a variety of disaster scenarios both inside the organization and across the community. The findings are even more dire among specialty care providers such as cardiologists and endocrinologists who provide critical treatment to individuals with chronic diseases, with just 29 percent reporting that they have a comprehensive disaster plan in place.

DrFirst, the nation's leading provider of e-prescribing and medication management solutions, conducted the disaster preparedness survey in August with 109 healthcare professionals across acute, ambulatory, hospice and home care. The results are critical for addressing potential safety issues that affect the health and lives of millions of Americans who are increasingly subject to hurricanes, wildfires, and floods as well as other man-made disasters like digital and criminal attacks.

"The fact that almost 70 percent of the surveyed healthcare providers have been affected by more than two disasters in the last 5 years should be a major wake-up call for the healthcare industry," said G. Cameron Deemer, president of DrFirst. "As we learned in the aftermath of major disasters such as Hurricanes Maria and Harvey, natural disasters lead to surging demands for acute and emergency care, especially from the most vulnerable patients who may have been displaced from their homes without medications or critical medical supplies, like oxygen or diabetic testing equipment. We must take measures now to address the critical gaps impacting patient care and safety, such as communication challenges and ready-access to medical records and specialty care providers."

Lack of secure communication is concerning for providers and patients
In addition to the widespread failure to implement comprehensive disaster planning, the survey revealed another key vulnerability: the widespread dependence on disaster communications methods that fail to meet legal requirements for secure communications between medical teams, pharmacies, and patients. Under the federal law known as HIPAA, a patient's private health information can only be shared with the patient or other providers via secure methods such as password-protected portals and secure messaging.

One-third or more of clinicians surveyed across acute, ambulatory and hospice/home health state that calling by phone is their top method for communicating with pharmacies, EMS units, patients and families, local authorities, and community health providers in times of disaster. Secure messaging and email complete the top three modes of communication.

A striking number of clinicians use regular unsecured text messaging to reach hospitals: more than one-quarter of respondents use this mode to communicate with hospitals during and immediately after a disaster strikes, and 22 percent report using unsecured texting to communicate with patients or their family members. According to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), the use of phones for texting of patient health information is only permissible through a secure messaging platform that provides message encryption. Encryption is also required when emailing patient health information.

Healthcare professionals working in hospitals were more aware of the need for secure messaging tools than individuals working in other settings, including specialty care providers. Forty-four percent of hospital-based respondents said that secure, HIPAA-compliant medical messaging is a key requirement of a disaster preparedness plan. In fact, hospital-based respondents indicated that the only requirements more important than secure messaging were the installation of backup generators in case of power outages (56 percent) and the ordering and maintaining of extra inventory of supplies and medications (52 percent). Yet, specialty providers place the need for including secure messaging at the very bottom of their disaster planning requirements (0 percent).

Telehealth is a viable disaster solution but requires connectivity
Forty-five percent of the survey respondents view telehealth as an effective option to provide care to patients across the community during or immediately after disasters or emergencies. However, more than half expressed concerns that connectivity and other technical issues could impact the reliability of telehealth, and only 27 percent believe their organization has deployed adequate telehealth capabilities.

Additional key findings from the survey include:

  • Organizations preparing for an impending disaster still rely heavily on paper, with most advising patients to keep copies of their medical records.
  • Just 40 percent of respondents believe their EMR/EHR has sufficient information available to take care of all patients during a disaster.
  • 72 percent of acute care respondents report having a comprehensive disaster recovery plan in place covering diverse scenarios and focusing both internally and externally, compared to just 29 percent of specialty providers.

To receive the survey results, or for clinicians that want to join in the conversation by taking the survey, respond by email to research@drfirst.com.

About DrFirst
DrFirst, the nation's leading provider of e-prescribing and medication management solutions, enables stakeholders across the healthcare industry to use comprehensive real-time data and connectivity to increase their patient safety ratings, efficiency and profitability. Today, more than 170,000 healthcare professionals and more than 60% of electronic health record (EHR) vendors depend on DrFirst's innovative software solutions to improve clinical workflows, expedite secure collaboration across a patient's care team and drive better health outcomes. The company's integrated technologies include its award-winning electronic prescribing platform, the most comprehensive medication history available, clinically specialized secure messaging, and patient medication adherence monitoring and benefits checking. In addition, DrFirst was the first to offer e-prescribing for controlled substances (EPCS) and is considered the industry standard for providers nationwide. For more information, please visit www.drfirst.com or connect with us @DrFirst.

DrFirst Media Contact:
Lisa Chernikoff
Amendola Communications
734-678-5513
lchernikoff@acmarketingpr.com

 

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SOURCE DrFirst

 

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