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TauRx Therapeutics Expands Alzheimer's Clinical Trials In The United States


1/6/2014 8:24:03 AM

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ABERDEEN, Scotland
, Jan. 6, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- TauRx Therapeutics Ltd, a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company developing a novel treatment for Alzheimer's disease, has expanded its international clinical trials by adding new research centers across the U.S. The addition of 35 clinical research centers means that more patients suffering from mild or moderate Alzheimer's, and their caregivers, will have an opportunity to see if they qualify for participation in TauRx's Alzheimer's clinical trials. Professor Claude M. Wischik, MD, TauRx's Co-founder and Chairman, said, "TauRx's treatment, LMTX, being evaluated in Phase 3 clinical trials for Alzheimer's, will represent a breakthrough in dementia treatment if, as we hope to demonstrate, it slows and even halts the progression of the disease, as our earlier studies have shown."

"This compound is potentially a disease-modifying approach to treating Alzheimer's, targeting the tangles of tau protein that develop in the brain which are clearly linked to the progression of dementia," said Professor Wischik. "We are pleased to expand the number of research centers conducting our clinical trial to permit more people across the U.S. to access our study." Importantly, added Wischik, "Only by participating in clinical studies such as ours, can we collectively in partnership with those living with Alzheimer's help advance the essential research that can result in the development of new medicines for this terminal medical condition."

The main purpose of TauRx's Phase 3 clinical research studies is to evaluate the effects of LMTX, a second generation tau aggregation inhibitor, on slowing and/or halting the progression of Alzheimer's disease. There is currently no cure for Alzheimer's, nor are there any current treatments that halt the progression of memory loss.

The expansion of study centers in the U.S. means that eligible patients in areas such as Bennington, Vermont; Farmington Hills, Michigan; Waukesha, Wisconsin; and Creve Coeur, Missouri can also participate in the studies.

With 5.2 million Americans living with Alzheimer's, chances are you probably know someone who is affected by Alzheimer's. You may have friends or family members who are living with Alzheimer's, which is currently the 6th leading cause of death in the U.S. To learn more about TauRx, please visit www.taurx.com. Patients and caregivers who are interested in learning more about potentially participating in TauRx's Alzheimer's clinical trials can visit www.AlzheimersPressRelease.com or call 1-855-786-7259.

About TauRx Therapeutics
TauRx Therapeutics Ltd was established in Singapore in 2002 with the aim of developing new treatments and diagnostics for a range of neurodegenerative diseases. The company's tau aggregation inhibitor, LMTX, is currently in global Phase 3 clinical trials for Alzheimer's and Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD). LMTX targets aggregates of abnormal fibers of tau protein that form inside nerve cells in the brain, giving rise to tau tangles. TauRx's primary research facilities are in Aberdeen, Scotland.

About Alzheimer's Disease and Tau Tangles
Alzheimer's disease is one of the most important health challenges worldwide, and the most common cause of dementia. According to the Geneva-based World Health Organization and Alzheimer's Disease International, global dementia cases are expected to triple by 2050 to an estimated 135 million people. One of the hallmark signs of Alzheimer's, tau tangles, are present in the same regions of the brain where neuronal degeneration and loss of neuronal cells eventually occur. These changes first appear 20-30 years before the disease becomes clinically evident.

SOURCE TauRx Therapeutics Ltd



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