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Diem Labs Release: Citicoline In Cerenx Crosses Blood-Brain Barrier For Brain Cell Recovery After Stroke Attack



8/1/2017 6:49:19 AM

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ANN ARBOR, MI--(Marketwired - August 01, 2017) -

Every 40 seconds, someone in the United States experiences a stroke, or an attack on the brain. However, many of victims don't even know they've had a stroke because it is "silent." It becomes a problem over time when brain health function begins to decline, and problems with memory, mood, concentration and decision-making become challenging. In recent years, more research has surfaced about natural compounds the brain needs to maintain health and recover from stroke attacks -- compounds like citicoline, found in the medical food supplement, Cerenx.

"The stats on strokes are scary when we think about the implications this has on brain health," says Dr. Ken Redcross, board-certified internal medicine physician. "While our attention has been primarily on making the public aware of stroke warning signs, we need to expand that awareness to prevention and recovery from strokes. There's little modern medicine can do once a patient has a stroke, but there's a lot we can do not only for prevention, but also recovery, if we incorporate holistic medicine practices into the patient's overall health care strategy."

Redcross says lesser-known strategies for silent stroke prevention and brain cell recovery include taking a specific form of citicoline called Xerenoos, which has been studied in nearly 100 human clinical trials. Research shows that when Xerenoos is taken within 4 hours of a stroke, patients recover most of their brain cells. It can protect against brain tissue damage, when the brain is injured. In the United States, the Xerenoos form of citicoline can be found in a medical food supplement called Cerenx.

"I've recommended Cerenx to patients and have seen surprisingly quick results of better cognitive response and alertness," said Redcross, who now works with the makers of Cerenx to educate consumers about the benefits of citicoline. "What's unique about Cerenx is that it has the ability to cross the blood-brain barrier allowing it to protect and restore important fats like phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine within the brain, which are critical to memory and otherwise destroyed during a stroke event."

Citicoline was originally developed in Japan for use on stroke patients and later introduced as a prescription drug in many European countries, where EMTs carry it on-hand and give to stroke victims on site. In these countries, citicoline is frequently prescribed for cognitive problems related to circulation and energy metabolism in the brain. Citicoline is produced by the body naturally from choline, which can be found in foods including eggs, beef liver and cruciferous vegetables. As you age, the body's ability to produce citicoline declines and therefore supplementation is often recommended.

When taking a medical food supplement, it is recommended to do so under a doctor's supervision. Cerenx contains 500 mg of citicoline, one of the precursors to acetylcholine and one of the most important brain chemicals involved in memory. The recommend dosage of Cerenx is two pills daily. It can be purchased directly online at www.cerenx.com and comes with free information to share with your health care practitioner.


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