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PLoS By Category | Recent PLoS Articles
Infectious Diseases - Non-Clinical Medicine - Pathology - Public Health and Epidemiology - Respiratory Medicine

The Role of Speciation in Positive Lowenstein-Jensen Culture Isolates from a High Tuberculosis Burden Country
Published: Friday, November 04, 2011
Author: William Worodria et al.

by William Worodria, Jillian Anderson, Adithya Cattamanchi, J. Lucian Davis, Saskia den Boon, Alfred Andama, Samuel D. Yoo, Moses Joloba, Laurence Huang, Midori Kato-Maeda

Objective

To determine the need for routine speciation of positive Lowenstein-Jensen mycobacterial cultures in HIV-infected patients suspected of having pulmonary tuberculosis at Mulago Hospital in Kampala, Uganda.

Methods

Sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage Lowenstein-Jensen mycobacterial culture isolates from consecutive, HIV-infected patients admitted to Mulago Hospital with 2 weeks or more of cough were subjected to IS6110 PCR and rpoB genetic analysis to determine the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) and non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM).

Results

Eighty (100%) mycobacterial cultures from 65 patients were confirmed to be members of MTBC. Subsequent analysis of the cultures from 54 patients by PCR and sequence analyses to identify co-infection with NTM confirmed the presence of MTBC as well as the presence of Micrococcus luteus (n?=?4), Janibacter spp. (n?=?1) and six cultures had organisms that could not be identified.

Conclusions

Presumptive diagnosis of tuberculosis on the basis of a positive Lowenstein-Jensen culture is sufficient in HIV-infected Ugandans suspected of having tuberculosis. Routine molecular confirmation of positive Lowenstein-Jensen cultures is unnecessary in this low resource setting.

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