BioSpace Collaborative

Academic/Biomedical Research
News & Jobs
Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical Channel Medical Device and Diagnostics Channel Clinical Research Channel BioSpace Collaborative    Job Seekers:  Register | Login          Employers:  Register | Login  

NEWSLETTERS
Free Newsletters
Archive
My Subscriptions

NEWS
News by Subject
News by Disease
News by Date
PLoS
Search News
Post Your News
JoVE

CAREER NETWORK
Job Seeker Login
Most Recent Jobs
Search Jobs
Post Resume
Career Fairs
Career Resources
For Employers

HOTBEDS
Regional News
US & Canada
  Biotech Bay
  Biotech Beach
  Genetown
  Pharm Country
  BioCapital
  BioMidwest
  Bio NC
  BioForest
  Southern Pharm
  BioCanada East
  C2C Services & Suppliers™
Europe
Asia

DIVERSITY

PROFILES
Company Profiles

INTELLIGENCE
Research Store

INDUSTRY EVENTS
Research Events
Post an Event
RESOURCES
Real Estate
Business Opportunities

PLoS By Category | Recent PLoS Articles
Biochemistry - Biophysics - Chemistry - Infectious Diseases - Molecular Biology - Physics - Urology

In Vitro HIV-1 LTR Integration into T-Cell Activation Gene CD27 Segment and the Decoy Effect of Modified-Sequence DNA
Published: Wednesday, November 28, 2012
Author: Rei Ohmori et al.

by Rei Ohmori, Tatsuaki Tsuruyama

Integration into the host genome is an essential step in the HIV-1 life cycle. However, the host genome sequence that is favored by HIV-1 during integration has never been documented. Here, we report that CD27, a T cell activation gene, includes a sequence that is a target for in vitro HIV-1 cDNA integration. This sequence has a high affinity for integrase, and the target nucleotides responsible for this higher affinity were identified using a crystal microbalance assay. In experiments involving a segment of the CD27 gene, integration converged in the target nucleotides and flanking sequence DNA, indicating that integration is probably dependent upon the secondary structure of the substrate DNA. Notably, decoy modified CD27 sequence DNAs in which the target nucleotides were replaced suppressed integration when accompanying the original CD27 sequence DNA. Our identified CD27 sequence DNA is useful for investigating the biochemistry of integrase and for in vitro assessment of integrase-binding inhibitors.
  More...