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PLoS By Category | Recent PLoS Articles
Diabetes and Endocrinology - Geriatrics - Neurological Disorders - Non-Clinical Medicine - Public Health and Epidemiology

Does Adhesive Capsulitis of the Shoulder Increase the Risk of Stroke? A Population-Based Propensity Score-Matched Follow-Up Study
Published: Monday, November 19, 2012
Author: Chueh-Hung Wu et al.

by Chueh-Hung Wu, Yen-Ho Wang, Ya-Ping Huang, Shin-Liang Pan

Objectives

A previous population-based study reported an increased risk of stroke after the occurrence of adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder (ACS), but there were substantial imbalances in the distribution of age and pre-existing vascular risk factors between subjects with ACS and without ACS, which might lead to a confounded association between ACS and stroke. The purpose of the present large-scale propensity score-matched population-based follow-up study was to clarify whether there is an increased stroke risk after ACS.

Methods

We used a logistic regression model that includes age, sex, pre-existing comorbidities and socioeconomic status as covariates to compute the propensity score. A total of 22025 subjects with at least two ambulatory visits with the principal diagnosis of ACS in 2001 was enrolled in the ACS group. The non-ACS group consisted of 22025, propensity score-matched subjects without ACS. The stroke-free survival curves for these 2 groups were compared using the Kaplan-Meier method. Stratified Cox proportional hazard regression with patients matched on propensity score was used to estimate the effect of ACS on the occurrence of stroke.

Results

During the two-year follow-up period, 657 subjects in the ACS group (2.98%) and 687 in the non-ACS group (3.12%) developed stroke. The hazard ratio (HR) of stroke for the ACS group was 0.93 compared to the non-ACS group (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83–1.04, P?=?0.1778). There was no statistically significant difference in stroke subtype distribution between the two groups (P?=?0.2114).

Conclusions

These findings indicate that ACS itself is not associated with an increased risk of subsequent stroke.

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