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PLoS By Category | Recent PLoS Articles
Nephrology - Obstetrics - Pediatrics and Child Health

Maternal Vitamin D Deficiency Delays Glomerular Maturity in F1 and F2 Offspring
Published: Tuesday, August 21, 2012
Author: Fernanda A. M. Nascimento et al.

by Fernanda A. M. Nascimento, Thais C. Ceciliano, Marcia B. Aguila, Carlos A. Mandarim-de-Lacerda

Background

There is a high prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency in women of reproductive age.

Methods

This work studied the first two generations of offspring (F1 and F2) of Swiss mice from mothers fed one of two diets: SC (standard chow) or VitD- (vitamin D-deficient). Functional and developmental kidney measurements were taken.

Results

The first two generations of the VitD- group had higher blood pressure at 6 months of age than the offspring of the SC group as well as an increase in renin and AT1r expression. However, at all ages, both F1 and F2 VitD- mice had shorter glomerular diameters, and diet played a significant role in the total variation. Both the F1 and F2 generations of the VitD- group had more immature glomeruli than offspring from the SC group. Immature glomeruli begin to disappear at 10 days, but at this age, F1-VitD- mice had more immature and mature glomeruli than F1-SC mice. At 6 months of age, F1-VitD- mice exhibited more glomeruli, while F2-VitD- mice exhibited the same number of glomeruli as F2-SC mice, but fewer glomeruli compared to the F1-VitD group. Both diet and generation account for the total variation in the number of glomeruli. Decreases in urine output and podocin expression and increases in urea and creatinine in the urine were observed in F1 offspring.

Conclusion

These findings demonstrate that maternal vitamin D deficiency accompanies changes in the renal expression of important factors that may retard the maturation of glomeruli by extending the period of nephrogenesis.

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