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PLoS By Category | Recent PLoS Articles
Immunology - Pediatrics and Child Health - Physiology - Public Health and Epidemiology - Respiratory Medicine

Mouse Allergen, Lung Function, and Atopy in Puerto Rican Children
Published: Monday, July 16, 2012
Author: Erick Forno et al.

by Erick Forno, Michelle M. Cloutier, Soma Datta, Kathryn Paul, Jody Sylvia, Deanna Calvert, Sherell Thornton-Thompson, Dorothy B. Wakefield, John Brehm, Robert G. Hamilton, María Alvarez, Angel Colón-Semidey, Edna Acosta-Pérez, Glorisa Canino, Juan C. Celedón

Objective

To examine the relation between mouse allergen exposure and asthma in Puerto Rican children.

Methods

Mus m 1, Der p 1, Bla g 2, and Fel d 1 allergens were measured in dust samples from homes of Puerto Rican children with (cases) and without (controls) asthma in Hartford, CT (n?=?449) and San Juan (SJ), Puerto Rico (n?=?678). Linear or logistic regression was used for the multivariate analysis of mouse allergen (Mus m 1) and lung function (FEV1 and FEV1/FVC) and allergy (total IgE and skin test reactivity (STR) to =1 allergen) measures.

Results

Homes in SJ had lower mouse allergen levels than those in Hartford. In multivariate analyses, mouse allergen was associated with higher FEV1 in cases in Hartford (+70.6 ml, 95% confidence interval (CI)?=?8.6–132.7 ml, P?=?0.03) and SJ (+45.1 ml, 95% CI?=? -0.5 to 90.6 ml, P?=?0.05). In multivariate analyses of controls, mouse allergen was inversely associated with STR to =1 allergen in non-sensitized children (odds ratio [OR] for each log-unit increment in Mus m 1?=?0.7, 95% CI?=?0.5–0.9, P<0.01). In a multivariate analysis including all children at both study sites, each log-increment in mouse allergen was positively associated with FEV1 (+28.3 ml, 95% CI?=?1.4–55.2 ml, P?=?0.04) and inversely associated with STR to =1 allergen (OR for each log-unit increment in Mus m 1?=?0.8, 95% CI?=?0.6–0.9, P<0.01).

Conclusions

Mouse allergen is associated with a higher FEV1 and lower odds of STR to =1 allergen in Puerto Rican children. This may be explained by the allergen itself or correlated microbial exposures.

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