BioSpace Collaborative

Academic/Biomedical Research
News & Jobs
Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical Channel Medical Device and Diagnostics Channel Clinical Research Channel BioSpace Collaborative    Job Seekers:  Register | Login          Employers:  Register | Login  

NEWSLETTERS
Free Newsletters
Archive
My Subscriptions

NEWS
News by Subject
News by Disease
News by Date
PLoS
Search News
Post Your News
JoVE

CAREER NETWORK
Job Seeker Login
Most Recent Jobs
Search Jobs
Post Resume
Career Fairs
Career Resources
For Employers

HOTBEDS
Regional News
US & Canada
  Biotech Bay
  Biotech Beach
  Genetown
  Pharm Country
  BioCapital
  BioMidwest
  Bio NC
  BioForest
  Southern Pharm
  BioCanada East
  C2C Services & Suppliers™
Europe
Asia

DIVERSITY

PROFILES
Company Profiles

INTELLIGENCE
Research Store

INDUSTRY EVENTS
Research Events
Post an Event
RESOURCES
Real Estate
Business Opportunities

PLoS By Category | Recent PLoS Articles
Neurological Disorders - Neuroscience - Surgery

Sub-Second Dopamine Detection in Human Striatum
Published: Thursday, August 04, 2011
Author: Kenneth T. Kishida et al.

by Kenneth T. Kishida, Stefan G. Sandberg, Terry Lohrenz, Youssef G. Comair, Ignacio Sáez, Paul E. M. Phillips, P. Read Montague

Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry at carbon fiber microelectrodes allows rapid (sub-second) measurements of dopamine release in behaving animals. Herein, we report the modification of existing technology and demonstrate the feasibility of making sub-second measurements of dopamine release in the caudate nucleus of a human subject during brain surgery. First, we describe the modification of our electrodes that allow for measurements to be made in a human brain. Next, we demonstrate in vitro and in vivo, that our modified electrodes can measure stimulated dopamine release in a rat brain equivalently to previously determined rodent electrodes. Finally, we demonstrate acute measurements of dopamine release in the caudate of a human patient during DBS electrode implantation surgery. The data generated are highly amenable for future work investigating the relationship between dopamine levels and important decision variables in human decision-making tasks.
  More...