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PLoS By Category | Recent PLoS Articles
Biochemistry - Neurological Disorders - Physiology - Radiology and Medical Imaging - Surgery

Weight Gain Is Associated with Medial Contact Site of Subthalamic Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease
Published: Wednesday, May 30, 2012
Author: Filip Ružicka et al.

by Filip Ružicka, Robert Jech, Lucie Nováková, Dušan Urgošík, Josef Vymazal, Evžen Ružicka

The aim of our study was to assess changes in body-weight in relation to active electrode contact position in the subthalamic nucleus. Regular body weight measurements were done in 20 patients with advanced Parkinson's disease within a period of 18 months after implantation. T1-weighted (1.5T) magnetic resonance images were used to determine electrode position in the subthalamic nucleus and the Unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS-III) was used for motor assessment. The distance of the contacts from the wall of the third ventricle in the mediolateral direction inversely correlated with weight gain (r?=?-0.55, p<0.01) and with neurostimulation-related motor condition expressed as the contralateral hemi-body UPDRS-III (r?=?-0.42, p<0.01). Patients with at least one contact within 9.3 mm of the wall experienced significantly greater weight gain (9.4±(SD)4.4 kg, N?=?11) than those with both contacts located laterally (3.9±2.7 kg, N?=?9) (p<0.001). The position of the active contact is critical not only for motor outcome but is also associated with weight gain, suggesting a regional effect of subthalamic stimulation on adjacent structures involved in the central regulation of energy balance, food intake or reward.
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