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PLoS By Category | Recent PLoS Articles
Geriatrics - Immunology - Physiology

Relationship between Systemic Inflammation and Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity Response to Candida Antigen in Older Adults
Published: Wednesday, May 02, 2012
Author: Brandt D. Pence et al.

by Brandt D. Pence, Thomas W. Lowder, K. Todd Keylock, Victoria J. Vieira Potter, Marc D. Cook, Edward McAuley, Jeffrey A. Woods

Research has shown that aging is associated with increased systemic inflammation as well as a reduction in the strength of immune responses. However, little evidence exists linking the decrease in cell-mediated immunity in older adults with other health parameters. We sought to examine the relationship between cell-mediated immunity as measured in vivo by the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to candida antigen and demographic and physiological variables in older (65–80 y.o.) adults. Candida antigen response was not related to gender or obesity, or to a number of other physiological variables including fitness and body composition. However, positive responders had significantly lower serum C-reactive protein levels (CRP, p<0.05) vs. non-responders. Furthermore, subjects with CRP<4.75 mg•L-1 had greater odds of developing a positive response compared to those with CRP>4.75 mg•L-1. Therefore, positive responses to candida antigen in older adults appears to be related to lower levels of systemic inflammation.
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