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PLoS By Category | Recent PLoS Articles
Ecology - Neurological Disorders - Physiology - Public Health and Epidemiology - Respiratory Medicine

Apparent Temperature and Cause-Specific Emergency Hospital Admissions in Greater Copenhagen, Denmark
Published: Friday, July 29, 2011
Author: Janine Wichmann et al.

by Janine Wichmann, Zorana Andersen, Matthias Ketzel, Thomas Ellermann, Steffen Loft

One of the key climate change factors, temperature, has potentially grave implications for human health. We report the first attempt to investigate the association between the daily 3-hour maximum apparent temperature (Tappmax) and respiratory (RD), cardiovascular (CVD), and cerebrovascular (CBD) emergency hospital admissions in Copenhagen, controlling for air pollution. The study period covered 1 January 2002-31 December 2006, stratified in warm and cold periods. A case-crossover design was applied. Susceptibility (effect modification) by age, sex, and socio-economic status was investigated. For an IQR (8°C) increase in the 5-day cumulative average of Tappmax, a 7% (95% CI: 1%, 13%) increase in the RD admission rate was observed in the warm period whereas an inverse association was found with CVD (-8%, 95% CI: -13%, -4%), and none with CBD. There was no association between the 5-day cumulative average of Tappmax during the cold period and any of the cause-specific admissions, except in some susceptible groups: a negative association for RD in the oldest age group and a positive association for CVD in men and the second highest SES group. In conclusion, an increase in Tappmax is associated with a slight increase in RD and decrease in CVD admissions during the warmer months.
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