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PLoS By Category | Recent PLoS Articles
Neurological Disorders - Non-Clinical Medicine - Physiology - Public Health and Epidemiology - Respiratory Medicine

Financial Incentive Increases CPAP Acceptance in Patients from Low Socioeconomic Background
Published: Friday, March 30, 2012
Author: Ariel Tarasiuk et al.

by Ariel Tarasiuk, Gally Reznor, Sari Greenberg-Dotan, Haim Reuveni

Objective

We explored whether financial incentives have a role in patients' decisions to accept (purchase) a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device in a healthcare system that requires cost sharing.

Design

Longitudinal interventional study.

Patients

The group receiving financial incentive (n?=?137, 50.8±10.6 years, apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) 38.7±19.9 events/hr) and the control group (n?=?121, 50.9±10.3 years, AHI 39.9±22) underwent attendant titration and a two-week adaptation to CPAP. Patients in the control group had a co-payment of $330–660; the financial incentive group paid a subsidized price of $55.

Results

CPAP acceptance was 43% greater (p?=?0.02) in the financial incentive group. CPAP acceptance among the low socioeconomic strata (n?=?113) (adjusting for age, gender, BMI, tobacco smoking) was enhanced by financial incentive (OR, 95% CI) (3.43, 1.09–10.85), age (1.1, 1.03–1.17), AHI (>30 vs. <30) (4.87, 1.56–15.2), and by family/friends who had positive experience with CPAP (4.29, 1.05–17.51). Among average/high-income patients (n?=?145) CPAP acceptance was affected by AHI (>30 vs. <30) (3.16, 1.14–8.75), living with a partner (8.82, 1.03–75.8) but not by the financial incentive. At one-year follow-up CPAP adherence was similar in the financial incentive and control groups, 35% and 39%, respectively (p?=?0.82). Adherence rate was sensitive to education (+yr) (1.28, 1.06–1.55) and AHI (>30 vs. <30) (5.25, 1.34–18.5).

Conclusions

Minimizing cost sharing reduces a barrier for CPAP acceptance among low socioeconomic status patients. Thus, financial incentive should be applied as a policy to encourage CPAP treatment, especially among low socioeconomic strata patients.

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