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Confirma, Inc.'s Study Presented at Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) Supports CADstream® for the Evaluation of Kinetics in Breast MRI


11/29/2007 4:05:18 PM

CHICAGO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Confirma®, pioneer and leader in application-specific CAD for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), announced that a study by the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance and the University of Washington presented today at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting (November 25-30, Chicago) suggests that the CADstream system’s patented “worst curve” algorithm for analyzing kinetics may assist in determining malignancy. The study, led by Dr. Lilian Wang, focused on the evaluation of kinetics and found that the most suspicious curve as identified by CADstream was significantly different between benign and malignant lesions. This supports the recommendation of the American College of Radiology’s Breast Imaging Reporting and Database System (BI-RADS®) Atlas for breast MRI to report the “worst looking” curve. The study found that any washout enhancement was associated with malignancy in nearly half of lesions.

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