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PLoS By Category | Recent PLoS Articles
Respiratory Medicine

Enhanced Virulence of Chlamydia muridarum Respiratory Infections in the Absence of TLR2 Activation
Published: Tuesday, June 14, 2011
Author: Xianbao He et al.

by Xianbao He, Anjali Nair, Samrawit Mekasha, Joseph Alroy, Catherine M. O'Connell, Robin R. Ingalls

Chlamydia trachomatis is a common sexually transmitted pathogen and is associated with infant pneumonia. Data from the female mouse model of genital tract chlamydia infection suggests a requirement for TLR2-dependent signaling in the induction of inflammation and oviduct pathology. We hypothesized that the role of TLR2 in moderating mucosal inflammation is site specific. In order to investigate this, we infected mice via the intranasal route with C. muridarum and observed that in the absence of TLR2 activation, mice had more severe disease, higher lung cytokine levels, and an exaggerated influx of neutrophils and T-cells into the lungs. This could not be explained by impaired bacterial clearance as TLR2-deficient mice cleared the infection similar to controls. These data suggest that TLR2 has an anti-inflammatory function in the lung during Chlamydia infection, and that the role of TLR2 in mucosal inflammation varies at different mucosal surfaces.
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