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Reproductive Medicine Associates of New Jersey and Auxogyn, Inc. Launch Fertility Study to Advance Goals of "One Embryo, One Healthy Baby"



6/27/2012 11:23:20 AM

MORRISTOWN, N.J., June 26, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Fertility experts at Reproductive Medicine Associates of New Jersey (RMANJ) announced that they will partner with Auxogyn, Inc., to conduct a groundbreaking IVF study that aims to advance the goals of single embryo transfer (SET), and reduce the financial and health implications of multiple pregnancies.

(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20120402/NY80340LOGO)

"Our objectives at RMANJ are two-fold: To increase the healthy live birth rate for those undergoing assisted reproductive procedures, and to decrease the multiple embryo transfer rate, thereby reducing multiple pregnancies," commented Richard T. Scott, Jr., M.D., F.A.C.O.G., H.C.L.D., founding partner of RMANJ. "Through this collaborative research study with Auxogyn, we will explore new, previously unidentified factors that cause one chromosomally normal embryo to implant where another seemingly healthy embryo does not. These discoveries could directly impact clinical practice in the future, moving us closer to the ultimate goal of the IVF field one embryo, one healthy baby."

For patients enrolled in the study, researchers will evaluate the use of both RMANJ's proprietary Comprehensive Chromosome Screening (CCS) and Auxogyn's Eeva (Early Embryo Viability Assessment) Test to detect healthy embryos prior to implantation. CCS is a rapid-method 24-chromosome screening technique that accurately identifies whether embryos are euploid (have a normal number of chromosomes) or aneuploid (have an abnormal number of chromosomes). Eeva is a non-invasive test, developed by Auxogyn, to record and quantitatively analyze embryo development against scientifically and clinically validated cell-division time periods.

More accurate identification of healthy embryos enables fertility doctors to implant a single embryo that will lead to a successful pregnancy and ultimately, a healthy baby. It also may reduce the practice of implanting multiple embryos, which commonly leads to pregnancies with twins, triplets or higher multiples. Many studies have shown that multiple births increase health complications for mothers and babies, and lead to greater healthcare costs. For example, the average cost per delivery for one baby is $14,842, while the cost per delivery for twins is $59,370 and per-delivery expenses for triplets jumps to $163,266.(1,2,3)

RMANJ's past research has shown that CCS supports the practice of SET, and reduces healthcare costs associated with pregnancy, delivery and neonatal care. New data from RMANJ's recently completed BEST (Blastocyst Euploid Selective Transfer) study will be presented at the upcoming American Society for Reproductive Medicine Annual Meeting in October 2012. Partnering with Auxogyn, a company at the forefront of reproductive health innovation, enables RMANJ to further extend research in this area.

"Auxogyn is committed to funding and conducting rigorous scientific research to continually improve outcomes for IVF patients," said Lissa Goldenstein, president and chief executive officer of Auxogyn. "We are pleased to partner with RMANJ and believe this study may expand our understanding of embryo development dramatically, potentially leading to further improvement in our ability to detect healthy embryos during assisted reproduction procedures."

A pioneer in using cutting-edge technology to more accurately detect healthy embryos, RMANJ is uniquely equipped to serve as the clinical study site for this research initiative. Patients who receive care at RMANJ's six clinics may be eligible for the study.

About Reproductive Medicine Associates of New Jersey

Reproductive Medicine Associates of New Jersey have pioneered and successfully implemented a cutting-edge technology, known as Comprehensive Chromosome Screening (CCS) to more accurately detect healthy embryos that will lead to successful pregnancies and ultimately healthy babies. Other centers have attempted similar testing methods, but RMANJ is the only fertility center in the world to have developed a system of unprecedented accuracy, fully validated through years of rigorous clinical research. RMANJ's Comprehensive Chromosome Screening offers advanced embryo selection with extreme accuracy by detecting and avoiding use of embryos with chromosomal abnormalities prior to transfer and pregnancy.

The fertility experts at RMANJ have among the highest IVF success rates in the country. Since 1999, they have helped bring more than 20,000 babies to loving families. In addition to serving as the Division of Reproductive Endocrinology at Robert Wood Johnson University Medical School in New Brunswick, NJ, the practice has six locations in New Jersey. For more information please call RMANJ at 973-656-2089, or visit www.rmanj.com.

References:

(1) Reindollar RH, Regan MM, Neumann PJ, Levine BS, Thornton KL, Alper MM, Goldman, MB. A randomized clinical trial to evaluate optimal treatment for unexplained infertility: the fast track and standard treatment (FASTT) trial. Fertil Steril 2010; 94:3:888-99.

(2) Callaham TL, Hall JE, Ettner SL, Christiansen CL, Greene MF, Crowley WF Jr. The economic impact of multiple-gestation pregnancies and the contribution of assisted-reproduction techniques to their incidence. N Engl J Med 1994;331:244-9.

(3) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, American Society for Reproductive Medicine, Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology. 2010 assisted reproductive technology success rates: national summary and fertility clinic reports. Atlanta: Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2012. Available at https://www.sartcorsonline.com/rptCSR_PublicMultYear.aspx?ClinicPKID=0. Accessed June 21, 2012.

SOURCE Reproductive Medicine Associates of New Jersey (RMANJ)


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