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Onyx Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (ONXX) Announces Data Presentations at 49th American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting



5/17/2013 10:27:51 AM

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SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA--(Marketwired - May 15, 2013) - Onyx Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NASDAQ: ONXX) today announced the upcoming presentations of data highlighting Nexavar® (sorafenib) tablets, Kyprolis® (carfilzomib) for Injection, and Stivarga® (regorafenib) tablets across a range of cancers. These presentations will take place at the 49th American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting, May 31 - June 4, 2013, in Chicago, IL.

"The data being presented at ASCO add to the depth of our understanding of how these medicines work across tumor types and treatment settings," said Pablo Cagnoni, M.D., Executive Vice President, Global Research & Development and Technical Operations at Onyx Pharmaceuticals. "We are committed to exploring therapies in difficult-to-treat cancers for patients who have limited treatment options."

Nexavar® (sorafenib) tablets

Sorafenib in locally advanced or metastatic patients with radioactive iodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer: The Phase 3 DECISION trial

  • Dr. Marcia Brose, University of Pennsylvania Health System, United States
  • Sunday, June 2, 2013
  • Oral Presentation: 3:20 - 3:35 p.m., N Hall B1
  • Plenary Session - Special Sessions, Core Sessions
  • Abstract # 4

Final analysis of GIDEON (Global Investigation of Therapeutic Decisions in Hepatocellular Carcinoma [HCC] and of Its Treatment with Sorafenib [Sor]) in > 3000 Sor-treated patients (pts): clinical findings in pts with liver dysfunction

  • Dr. Jorge Marrero, University of Michigan, United States
  • Sunday, June 2, 2013
  • Poster viewing: 8:00 - 11:45 a.m., S Hall A2
  • General poster session - Gastrointestinal (Noncolorectal) Cancer
  • Abstract # 4126

Kyprolis® (carfilzomib) for Injection

Final results from the Phase 1b/2 study (PX-171-006) of carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and low-dose dexamethasone (CRd) in patients with relapsed or progressive multiple myeloma

  • Dr. Michael Wang, MD Anderson Cancer Center, United States
  • Monday, June 3, 2013
  • Poster viewing: 1:15 - 5:15 p.m., E450b
  • Poster discussion: 4:45 - 5:45 p.m., E354b
  • Poster discussion session - Lymphoma and Plasma Cell Disorders, Poster #9
  • Abstract # 8529

Effect of CMP, carfilzomib (CFZ) plus melphalan-prednisone (MP), on response rates in elderly patients (pts) with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (NDMM): Results of a Phase (Ph) 1/2 trial

  • Dr. Cyrille Touzeau, University of Nantes, France
  • Monday, June 3, 2013
  • Oral Presentation: 9:15 - 9:30 a.m., E Arie Crown Theater
  • Oral abstract session - Myeloma
  • Abstract # 8513

Retrospective analysis of cardiovascular (CV) events following compassionate use of carfilzomib (CFZ) in patients (Pts) with relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM)

  • Dr. Shebli Atrash, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, United States
  • Sunday, June 2, 2013
  • Poster viewing: 8:00 - 11:45 a.m., S Hall A2
  • General poster session - Lymphoma and Plasma Cell Disorders
  • Abstract # 8595

Results of a Phase 1/2 study (NCT01365559) of carfilzomib (CFZ) replacing bortezomib (BTZ) in BTZ-containing regimens for BTZ-treated patients (pts) with relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma (MM)

  • Dr. James R. Berenson, Institute for Myeloma & Bone Cancer Research, United States
  • Sunday, June 2, 2013
  • Poster viewing: 8:00 - 11:45 a.m., S Hall A2
  • General poster session - Lymphoma and Plasma Cell Disorders
  • Abstract # 8599

Results of a Phase 1 trial of the proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib in patients with relapsed or refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and small lymphocytic leukemia (SLL)

  • Dr. Jennifer Ann Woyach, Ohio State University, United States
  • Sunday, June 2, 2013
  • Poster viewing: 8:00 - 11:45 a.m., S Hall A2
  • General poster session - Leukemia, Myelodysplasia, and Transplantation
  • Abstract # 7077

Treatment outcome with the combination of carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and low-dose dexamethasone (CRd) for newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (NDMM) after extended follow-up

  • Dr. Andrzej J. Jakubowiak, University of Chicago, United States
  • Monday, June 3, 2013
  • Poster viewing: 1:15 - 5:15 p.m., E450b
  • Poster discussion: 4:45 - 5:45 p.m., E354b
  • Poster discussion session - Lymphoma and Plasma Cell Disorders, Poster #23
  • Abstract # 8543

Stivarga® (regorafenib) tablets

Mutational analysis of plasma DNA from patients (pts) in the Phase 3 GRID study of regorafenib (REG) vs placebo (PL) in tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)-refractory GIST: correlating genotype with clinical outcomes

  • Dr. George Demetri, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, United States
  • Monday, June 3, 2013
  • Oral Presentation: 3:45 - 4:00 p.m., S100bc
  • Oral abstract session - Sarcoma
  • Abstract # 10503

Results from a Phase 3 trial (GRID) evaluating regorafenib (REG) in metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST): subgroup analysis of outcomes based on pretreatment characteristics

  • Dr. Heikki Joensuu, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland
  • Saturday, June 1, 2013
  • Poster viewing: 1:15 - 5:00 p.m., S Hall A2
  • General poster session - Sarcoma
  • Abstract # 10551

Regorafenib (REG) in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) progressing following sorafenib: an ongoing randomized, double-blind, Phase 3 trial

  • Dr. Ann-Lii Cheng, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei
  • Sunday, June 2, 2013
  • Poster viewing: 8:00 - 11:45 a.m., S Hall A2
  • General poster session - Gastrointestinal (Noncolorectal) Cancer
  • Abstract # TPS4163 (Trials in Progress)

Time profile of adverse events (AEs) from regorafenib (REG) treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) in the Phase 3 CORRECT study

  • Dr. Axel Grothey, Mayo Clinic, United States
  • Sunday, June 2, 2013
  • Poster viewing: 8:00 - 11:45 a.m., S Hall A2
  • General poster session - Gastrointestinal (Colorectal) Cancer
  • Abstract # 3637

Regorafenib (REG) in progressive metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC): analysis of age subgroups in the Phase 3 CORRECT trial

  • Dr. Eric van Cutsem, University Hospital Leuven in Gasthuisberg, Belgium
  • Sunday, June 2, 2013
  • Poster viewing: 8:00 - 11:45 a.m., S Hall A2
  • General poster session - Gastrointestinal (Colorectal) Cancer
  • Abstract # 3636

Analysis of plasma protein biomarkers from the CORRECT Phase 3 study of regorafenib for metastatic colorectal cancer

  • Dr. Heinz-Josef Lenz, USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, United States
  • Tuesday, June 4, 2013
  • Poster viewing: 8:00 - 12:00 p.m., S405
  • Poster discussion: 11:30 - 12:30 p.m., S406
  • Poster discussion session - Gastrointestinal (Colorectal) Cancer, Poster #6
  • Abstract # 3514

About Nexavar® (sorafenib) Tablets

Nexavar is approved in the U.S. for the treatment of patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma and for the treatment of patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma. Nexavar is thought to inhibit both the tumor cell and tumor vasculature. In preclinical studies, Nexavar has been shown to inhibit multiple kinases thought to be involved in both cell proliferation (growth) and angiogenesis (blood supply) -- two important processes that enable cancer growth. These kinases include Raf kinase, VEGFR-1, VEGFR-2, VEGFR-3, PDGFR-B, KIT, FLT-3 and RET.

Nexavar is currently approved in more than 100 countries. Nexavar is also being evaluated by Bayer and Onyx, international study groups, government agencies and individual investigators in a range of cancers.

Important Safety Considerations For Nexavar® (sorafenib) Tablets
Nexavar in combination with carboplatin and paclitaxel is contraindicated in patients with squamous cell lung cancer.

Cardiac ischemia and/or myocardial infarction may occur. Temporary or permanent discontinuation of Nexavar should be considered in patients who develop cardiac ischemia and/or myocardial infarction.

An increased risk of bleeding may occur following Nexavar administration. If bleeding necessitates medical intervention, consider permanent discontinuation of Nexavar.

Hypertension may occur early in the course of treatment. Monitor blood pressure weekly during the first 6 weeks and periodically thereafter and treat, if required.

Hand-foot skin reaction and rash are common and management may include topical therapies for symptomatic relief. In cases of any severe or persistent adverse reactions, temporary treatment interruption, dose modification, or permanent discontinuation of Nexavar should be considered. Nexavar should be discontinued if Stevens-Johnson Syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis are suspected as these may be life threatening.

Gastrointestinal perforation was an uncommon adverse reaction and has been reported in less than 1% of patients taking Nexavar. Discontinue Nexavar in the event of a gastrointestinal perforation.

Patients taking concomitant warfarin should be monitored regularly for changes in prothrombin time (PT), International Normalized Ratio (INR) or clinical bleeding episodes.

Temporary interruption of Nexavar therapy is recommended in patients undergoing major surgical procedures.

Nexavar in combination with gemcitabine/cisplatin is not recommended in patients with squamous cell lung cancer.

The safety and effectiveness of Nexavar has not been established in patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

Nexavar can prolong the QT/QTc interval and increase the risk for ventricular arrhythmias.

Avoid use in patients with congenital long QT syndrome and monitor patients with congestive heart failure, bradyarrhythmias, drugs known to prolong the QT interval, and electrolyte abnormalities.

Drug-induced hepatitis with Nexavar may result in hepatic failure and death. Liver function tests should be monitored regularly and in cases of increased transaminases without alternative explanation Nexavar should be discontinued.

Nexavar may cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Women of childbearing potential should be advised to avoid becoming pregnant while on Nexavar and female patients should also be advised against breastfeeding while receiving Nexavar.

Elevations in serum lipase and reductions in serum phosphate of unknown etiology have been associated with Nexavar.

Avoid concomitant use of strong CYP3A4 inducers, when possible, because inducers can decrease the systemic exposure of Nexavar. Nexavar exposure decreases when coadministered with oral neomycin. Effects of other antibiotics on Nexavar pharmacokinetics have not been studied.

Most common adverse reactions reported for Nexavar-treated patients vs. placebo-treated patients in unresectable HCC, respectively, were: diarrhea (55% vs. 25%), fatigue (46% vs. 45%), abdominal pain (31% vs. 26%), weight loss (30% vs. 10%), anorexia (29% vs. 18%), nausea (24% vs. 20%), and hand-foot skin reaction (21% vs. 3%). Grade 3/4 adverse reactions were 45% vs. 32%.

Most common adverse reactions reported for Nexavar-treated patients vs. placebo-treated patients in advanced RCC, respectively, were: diarrhea (43% vs. 13%), rash/desquamation (40% vs. 16%), fatigue (37% vs. 28%), hand-foot skin reaction (30% vs. 7%), alopecia (27% vs. 3%), and nausea (23% vs. 19%). Grade 3/4 adverse reactions were 38% vs. 28%.

For information about Nexavar including U.S. Nexavar prescribing information, visit www.nexavar-us.com or call 1.866.NEXAVAR (1.866.639.2827).

Indication and Important Safety Information for Kyprolis® (carfilzomib) for Injection

Kyprolis™ (carfilzomib) for Injection is indicated for the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma who have received at least 2 prior therapies including bortezomib and an immunomodulatory agent and have demonstrated disease progression on or within 60 days of completion of the last therapy. Approval is based on response rate. Clinical benefit, such as improvement in survival or symptoms, has not been verified.

The safety of KYPROLIS was evaluated in clinical studies of 526 patients with relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma.

Death due to cardiac arrest has occurred within a day of KYPROLIS administration. New onset or worsening of pre-existing congestive heart failure with decreased left ventricular function or myocardial ischemia have occurred following administration of KYPROLIS. Cardiac failure events (e.g., cardiac failure congestive, pulmonary edema, ejection fraction decreased) were reported in 7% of patients. Monitor for cardiac complications and manage promptly. Withhold KYPROLIS for Grade 3 or 4 cardiac events until recovery and consider whether to restart KYPROLIS based on a benefit/risk assessment. Patients with New York Heart Association Class III and IV heart failure, myocardial infarction in the preceding 6 months, and conduction abnormalities uncontrolled by medications may be at greater risk for cardiac complications.

Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) was reported in 2% of patients treated with KYPROLIS and was Grade 3 or greater in less than 1% of patients. Evaluate with cardiac imaging and/or other tests as indicated. Withhold KYPROLIS for pulmonary hypertension until resolved or returned to baseline and consider whether to restart KYPROLIS based on a benefit/risk assessment.

Dyspnea was reported in 35% of patients enrolled in clinical trials. Grade 3 dyspnea occurred in 5%; no Grade 4 events, and 1 death (Grade 5) was reported. Monitor and manage dyspnea immediately; interrupt KYPROLIS until symptoms have resolved or returned to baseline.

Infusion reactions were characterized by a spectrum of systemic symptoms, including fever, chills, arthralgia, myalgia, facial flushing, facial edema, vomiting, weakness, shortness of breath, hypotension, syncope, chest tightness, or angina. These reactions can occur immediately following infusion or up to 24 hours after administration of KYPROLIS. Administer dexamethasone prior to KYPROLIS to reduce the incidence and severity of reactions. Inform patients of the risk and symptoms, and to contact physician if symptoms of an infusion reaction occur.

Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) occurred following KYPROLIS administration in < 1% of patients. Patients with multiple myeloma and a high tumor burden should be considered to be at greater risk for TLS. Prior to receiving KYPROLIS, ensure that patients are well hydrated. Monitor for evidence of TLS during treatment, and manage promptly. Interrupt KYPROLIS until TLS is resolved.

KYPROLIS causes thrombocytopenia with platelet nadirs occurring around Day 8 of each 28-day cycle and recovery to baseline by the start of the next 28-day cycle. In patients with multiple myeloma, 36% of patients experienced thrombocytopenia, including Grade 4 in 10%. Thrombocytopenia following KYPROLIS administration resulted in a dose reduction in 1% of patients and discontinuation of treatment with KYPROLIS in < 1% of patients. Monitor platelet counts frequently during treatment with KYPROLIS. Reduce or interrupt dose as clinically indicated.

Cases of hepatic failure, including fatal cases, have been reported ( < 1%). KYPROLIS can cause elevations of serum transaminases and bilirubin. Withhold KYPROLIS in patients experiencing Grade 3 or greater elevations of transaminases, bilirubin, or other liver enzyme abnormalities until resolved or returned to baseline. After resolution, consider if restarting KYPROLIS is appropriate. Monitor liver enzymes frequently.

KYPROLIS can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman based on its mechanism of action and findings in animals. There are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women using KYPROLIS. Carfilzomib caused embryo-fetal toxicity in pregnant rabbits at doses that were lower than in patients receiving the recommended dose. Females of reproductive potential should be advised to avoid becoming pregnant while being treated with KYPROLIS.

Serious adverse reactions were reported in 45% of patients. The most common serious adverse reactions were pneumonia (10%), acute renal failure (4%), pyrexia (3%), and congestive heart failure (3%). Adverse reactions leading to discontinuation of KYPROLIS occurred in 15% of patients and included congestive heart failure (2%), cardiac arrest, dyspnea, increased blood creatinine, and acute renal failure (1% each).

The most common adverse reactions (incidence ≥ 30%) were fatigue (56%), anemia (47%), nausea (45%), thrombocytopenia (36%), dyspnea (35%), diarrhea (33%), and pyrexia (30%).

Since dialysis clearance of KYPROLIS concentrations has not been studied, the drug should be administered after the dialysis procedure.

Full prescribing information is available at http://www.kyprolis.com.

About Stivarga® (regorafenib) Tablets
In the United States, Stivarga is indicated for the treatment of patients with mCRC who have been previously treated with fluoropyrimidine-, oxaliplatin- and irinotecan-based chemotherapy, an anti-VEGF therapy, and, if KRAS wild type, an anti-EGFR therapy. It is also indicated for the treatment of patients with locally advanced, unresectable or metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) who have been previously treated with imatinib mesylate and sunitinib malate.

Stivarga is an inhibitor of multiple kinases involved in normal cellular functions and in pathologic processes such as oncogenesis, tumor angiogenesis, and maintenance of the tumor microenvironment.

For full prescribing information, including BOXED WARNING, visit www.stivarga-us.com.

Important Safety Information For Stivarga® (regorafenib) Tablets

WARNING: HEPATOTOXICITY

  • Severe and sometimes fatal hepatotoxicity has been observed in clinical trials.
  • Monitor hepatic function prior to and during treatment.
  • Interrupt and then reduce or discontinue Stivarga for hepatotoxicity as manifested by elevated liver function tests or hepatocellular necrosis, depending upon severity and persistence.

Severe drug-induced liver injury with fatal outcome occurred in 0.3% of 1200 Stivarga-treated patients across all clinical trials. In metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), fatal hepatic failure occurred in 1.6% of patients in the Stivarga arm and in 0.4% of patients in the placebo arm; all the patients with hepatic failure had metastatic disease in the liver. In gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), fatal hepatic failure occurred in 0.8% of patients in the Stivarga arm.

Obtain liver function tests (ALT, AST, and bilirubin) before initiation of Stivarga and monitor at least every 2 weeks during the first 2 months of treatment. Thereafter, monitor monthly or more frequently as clinically indicated. Monitor liver function tests weekly in patients experiencing elevated liver function tests until improvement to less than 3 times the upper limit of normal (ULN) or baseline values. Temporarily hold and then reduce or permanently discontinue Stivarga, depending on the severity and persistence of hepatotoxicity as manifested by elevated liver function tests or hepatocellular necrosis.

Stivarga caused an increased incidence of hemorrhage. The overall incidence (Grades 1-5) was 21% and 11% with Stivarga vs 8% and 3% with placebo in mCRC and GIST patients, respectively. Fatal hemorrhage occurred in 4 of 632 (0.6%) Stivarga-treated patients and involved the respiratory, gastrointestinal, or genitourinary tracts. Permanently discontinue Stivarga in patients with severe or life-threatening hemorrhage and monitor INR levels more frequently in patients receiving warfarin.

Stivarga caused an increased incidence of hand-foot skin reaction (HFSR) (also known as palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia [PPE]) and severe rash, frequently requiring dose modification. The overall incidence was 45% and 67% with Stivarga vs 7% and 12% with placebo in mCRC and GIST patients, respectively. Incidence of Grade 3 HFSR (17% vs 0% in mCRC and 22% vs 0% in GIST), Grade 3 rash (6% vs < 1% in mCRC and 7% vs 0% in GIST), serious adverse reactions of erythema multiforme (0.2% vs 0% in mCRC), and Stevens-Johnson syndrome (0.2% vs 0% in mCRC) was higher in Stivarga-treated patients. Toxic epidermal necrolysis occurred in 0.17% of 1200 Stivarga-treated patients across all clinical trials. Withhold Stivarga, reduce the dose, or permanently discontinue depending on the severity and persistence of dermatologic toxicity.

Stivarga caused an increased incidence of hypertension (30% vs 8% in mCRC and 59% vs 27% in GIST with Stivarga vs placebo, respectively). Hypertensive crisis occurred in 0.25% of 1200 Stivarga-treated patients across all clinical trials. Do not initiate Stivarga until blood pressure is adequately controlled. Monitor blood pressure weekly for the first 6 weeks of treatment and then every cycle, or more frequently, as clinically indicated. Temporarily or permanently withhold Stivarga for severe or uncontrolled hypertension.

Stivarga increased the incidence of myocardial ischemia and infarction in mCRC (1.2% with Stivarga vs 0.4% with placebo). Withhold Stivarga in patients who develop new or acute cardiac ischemia or infarction, and resume only after resolution of acute cardiac ischemic events if the potential benefits outweigh the risks of further cardiac ischemia.

Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome (RPLS) occurred in 1 of 1200 Stivarga-treated patients across all clinical trials. Perform an evaluation for RPLS in any patient presenting with seizures, headache, visual disturbances, confusion, or altered mental function. Confirm the diagnosis of RPLS with MRI and discontinue Stivarga in patients who develop RPLS.

Gastrointestinal perforation or fistula occurred in 0.6% of 1200 patients treated with Stivarga across clinical trials. In GIST, 2.1% (4/188) of Stivarga-treated patients developed gastrointestinal fistula or perforation: of these, 2 cases of gastrointestinal perforation were fatal. Permanently discontinue Stivarga in patients who develop gastrointestinal perforation or fistula.

Treatment with Stivarga should be stopped at least 2 weeks prior to scheduled surgery. Resuming treatment after surgery should be based on clinical judgment of adequate wound healing. Stivarga should be discontinued in patients with wound dehiscence.

Stivarga can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Use effective contraception during treatment and up to 2 months after completion of therapy. If this drug is used during pregnancy, or if the patient becomes pregnant while taking this drug, the patient should be apprised of the potential hazard to the fetus.

Because many drugs are excreted in human milk and because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants from Stivarga, a decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing or discontinue the drug, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother.

The most frequently observed adverse drug reactions ( ≥ 30%) in Stivarga-treated patients vs placebo-treated patients in mCRC, respectively, were: asthenia/fatigue (64% vs 46%), decreased appetite and food intake (47% vs 28%), HFSR/PPE (45% vs 7%), diarrhea (43% vs 17%), mucositis (33% vs 5%), weight loss (32% vs 10%), infection (31% vs 17%), hypertension (30% vs 8%), and dysphonia (30% vs 6%).

The most frequently observed adverse drug reactions ( ≥ 30%) in Stivarga-treated patients vs placebo-treated patients in GIST, respectively, were: HFSR/PPE (67% vs 15%), hypertension (59% vs 27%), asthenia/fatigue (52% vs 39%), diarrhea (47% vs 9%), mucositis (40% vs 8%), dysphonia (39% vs 9%), infection (32% vs 5%), decreased appetite and food intake (31% vs 21%), and rash (30% vs 3%).

For full prescribing information, including BOXED WARNING, visit www.stivarga-us.com.

About Onyx Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Based in South San Francisco, California, Onyx Pharmaceuticals, Inc. is a global biopharmaceutical company engaged in the development and commercialization of innovative therapies for improving the lives of people with cancer. The company is focused on developing novel medicines that target key molecular pathways. For more information about Onyx, visit the company's website at www.onyx.com. Onyx Pharmaceuticals is on Twitter. Sign up to follow our Twitter feed @OnyxPharm at http://twitter.com/OnyxPharm.

Forward-Looking Statements

This news release contains "forward-looking statements" of Onyx within the meaning of the federal securities laws. These forward-looking statements include without limitation, statements regarding the progress and results of the clinical development, safety, regulatory processes, commercialization efforts or commercial potential of Nexavar® (sorafenib) tablets, Kyprolis® (carfilzomib) for Injection and Stivarga® (regorafenib) tablets. These statements are subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results and events to differ materially from those anticipated, including risks related to the development and commercialization of pharmaceutical products. Any statements contained in this press release that are not statements of historical fact may be deemed to be forward-looking statements. Reference should be made to Onyx's Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarterly period ended March 31, 2013, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission under the heading "Risk Factors" for a more detailed description of such factors. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements that speak only as of the date of this release. Onyx undertakes no obligation to update publicly any forward-looking statements to reflect new information, events, or circumstances after the date of this release except as required by law.


Contacts:

Investors
Amy Figueroa
Senior Director, Investor Relations
(650) 266-2398

Media
Lori Melançon
Senior Director, Corporate Communications
(650) 266-2394



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