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Myomo, Inc. Presenting Personal Robotics at Consumer Electronics Show; Exhibiting in Carnegie Mellon Quality of Life Technology Center


1/12/2012 9:32:47 AM

CAMBRIDGE, MA AND LAS VEGAS, January 12, 2012 – Myomo, Inc., a new generation medical device company that restores movement to disabled individuals is showcasing its Myomo System technology that combines robotics and neuroscience to help empower individuals with neurological conditions such as stroke, brain injuries, spinal cord injuries, multiple sclerosis and ALS to re-engage weak muscles and restore movement. The company will be presenting the Myomo technology during the Silvers Summit Tech Zone Talks (Thursday, January 12 at 3:15 PM) on the Tech Zone Stage in the North Hall.

Myomo is also being featured at the Carnegie Mellon Quality of Life Technology (QoLT) Center exhibit (Booth #3011). The QoLT Center’s mission is to transform lives in a large and growing segment of the population – people with reduced functional capabilities due to aging or disability. The Center is working to create revolutionary technologies that will improve and sustain the quality of life for all people.

“Myomo is helping stroke survivors and others affected by neurological and muscular conditions relearn muscle motion and regain quality of life, helping to regain independence and improve outcomes,” said Paul Paul R. Gudonis, chief executive officer, Myomo. “We are honored to have been selected by the Carnegie Mellon Quality of Life Technology Center to showcase our suite of products and collaborate in bringing this innovative technology to more patients with disability.”

The Myomo device was recently named the 2011 Product of the Year by the Massachusetts Technology Leadership Council (MassTLC). It is prescribed as an assistive device for home use and is also used in clinical rehabilitation programs.

About the mPower Mobility System

The mPower Mobility System helps individuals with limited or abnormal arm motion caused by conditions such as stroke, brain and spinal cord injuries, multiple sclerosis and ALS regain range of motion in their arms. The mPower Mobility System is an upper limb functional orthosis used to address musculature deformities with a non-invasive human machine interface (HMI) that amplifies the weakened electrical signals in muscles in the arm, helping the patient to complete routine tasks. It works by sensing the body’s own muscle activity, and helps weak or paralyzed arm muscles relearn motion. The device provides appropriate assistance to enable desired motion, allowing the patient to regain activities of daily living (i.e., lifting a glass to take a drink).

Myomo has also developed the PERL (Push-Eat-Reach-Lift) Technique, evidence-based treatment plans to maximize outcomes with the mPower Mobility System device. The company is also developing mobile applications and virtual reality-based games to enhance therapeutic training and track and measure progress while using the device.

About Myomo

Myomo is a new generation medical device company that combines innovative robotics technology with an advanced human machine interface to restore the ability to perform movements effectively among disabled individuals. Myomo's technology was originally developed at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in collaboration with medical experts affiliated with Harvard Medical School. Our mission is to help restore independence for individuals who suffer from major dysfunction of an affected joint. The Myomo mPower Mobiltiy System has received marketing clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and is designed to enable individuals to self-initiate and control movement of partially paralyzed limbs using their own biological signals. Myomo’s product may be reimbursable for disabled individuals unable to perform fine and gross movements with their affected arm. For more information visit, http://www.myomo.com


Read at BioSpace.com

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