News | News By Subject | News by Disease News By Date | Search News
Get Our FREE
Industry eNewsletter
email:    
   

Kimball Genetics, Inc. Launches The Warfarin Sensitivity DNA Test For Research


11/14/2006 1:26:59 PM

DENVER, Nov. 14 /PRNewswire/ -- Kimball Genetics, Inc. is pleased to announce today the launch of its Warfarin Sensitivity DNA Test for research/investigational purposes. Warfarin is the most frequently prescribed oral anticoagulant used for the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic events. However, it is a difficult drug to manage due to its narrow therapeutic range and inconsistent patient response resulting from inter-individual variability. Genetic information available from the new pharmacogenomic test will help predict response. The Warfarin Sensitivity DNA Test determines the presence of specific variations in the CYP2C9 and VKORC1 genes that confer sensitivity to warfarin and thus significantly reduce the required maintenance dose. CYP2C9 is involved in warfarin metabolism and VKORC1 influences warfarin's anticoagulation effect through vitamin K. Kimball Genetics expects to offer the Warfarin Sensitivity DNA Test for routine clinical use early in 2007.

The FDA Clinical Pharmacology Subcommittee of the Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Sciences has recommended testing for variations in the CYP2C9 and VKORC1 in patients requiring warfarin therapy. The drug label will reflect this recommendation soon.

The Warfarin Sensitivity DNA Test that Kimball offers informs the prescriber about the presence of genetic risk factors for overanticoagulation and should help achieve the correct maintenance dose faster. It is also likely to increase the safety and efficacy of warfarin treatment. The DNA test identifies patients who are sensitive to warfarin and who therefore: 1) require a lower dose to achieve a target INR, 2) may be at an increased risk for bleeding complications, and 3) without the DNA test, would require a longer period of time to achieve stable warfarin dosing.

Kimball Genetics welcomes research and clinical trial collaborations and with academic institutions, pharmaceutical companies, and other companies requiring genotype information for studies involving warfarin. One such project currently underway is "Pharmacogenetics for Coumadin" with pathologist Dr. David Feldman of the St Luke's Episcopal Hospital in Houston, TX.

"We are excited to be expanding into the pharmocogenomic arena with the Warfarin Sensitivity DNA Test," says Dr. Annette K. Taylor, President and CEO of Kimball Genetics, Inc. "With our one day turnaround time we believe we will be able to offer physicians the quick answers they need regarding their patients' sensitivity to warfarin and their dosing requirements." Kimball Genetics is committed to the growing application of pharmacogenomic testing to mainstream medicine and plans to offer more tests in 2007 and beyond. "This is the beginning of a new era of personalized medicine which will allow individual customization of drug therapy," remarks Dr. Taylor. Kimball Genetics is a member of the Personalized Medicine Coalition, a non-profit group of academic and industrial organizations, patient groups, and healthcare providers dedicated to advancing the adoption of personalized medicine for the benefit of patients.

About Kimball Genetics, Inc.

Founded in 1994 by Annette K. Taylor, M.S., Ph.D., Kimball Genetics is a national DNA diagnostic laboratory located in Denver, CO and specializing in testing for common genetic disorders that are preventable or can be treated. Known for its unparalleled turnaround time and distinctive focus on genetic counseling and education, the company's major areas of testing currently include inherited hypercoagulability, celiac disease, hemochromatosis, cystic fibrosis, and fragile X syndrome. The Warfarin Sensitivity DNA Test is Kimball's first offering in an exciting new pharmacogenomics program.

Kimball Genetics, Inc.

CONTACT: Kimball Genetics, Inc., +1-303-320-1807, or fax, +1-303-388-9220,mspringer@kimballgenetics.com


Read at BioSpace.com

comments powered by Disqus
   

ADD TO DEL.ICIO.US    ADD TO DIGG    ADD TO FURL    ADD TO STUMBLEUPON    ADD TO TECHNORATI FAVORITES