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Breathalyzer Technology Detects Acetone Levels To Monitor Blood Glucose In Diabetics: American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists


11/13/2013 11:52:30 AM

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Embargoed: Breathalyzer Technology Detects Acetone Levels to Monitor Blood Glucose in Diabetics

Arlington, Va. — A novel hand-held, noninvasive monitoring device that uses multilayer nanotechnology to detect acetone has been shown to correlate with blood-glucose levels in the breath of diabetics. This research is being presented at the 2013 American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) Annual Meeting and Exposition, the world’s largest pharmaceutical sciences meeting, in San Antonio, Nov. 10–14.

Diabetes, which affects an estimated 347 million people worldwide according to the World Health Organization, is an autoimmune disease that prevents the natural cellular uptake of sugar from the blood and often requires continuous blood-glucose monitoring. Current technology, such as the blood glucose meter, is invasive and causes discomfort to patients, often resulting in low compliance. This in turn can ultimately lead to poor health outcomes.

Ronny Priefer, Ph.D., of Western New England University, created the multilayer technology using nanometer-thick films consisting of two polymers that react with acetone. This crosslinks the polymers and alters the physicochemical nature of the film, which provides a quantification of the acetone and thus the blood-glucose levels.

“Breathalyzers are a growing field of study because of their potential to have a significant positive impact on patients’ quality of life and compliance with diabetes monitoring. What makes our technology different is that it only accounts for acetone and doesn’t react with other components in the breath,” said Priefer. “The breathalyzer we currently have is about the size of a book, but we’re working with an engineer, Dr. Michael Rust at Western New England University, to make it smaller, more similar to the size of a breathalyzer typically used to detect blood alcohol content levels.”

Other common shortfalls with current attempted breathalyzer technology are inconstant results due to the natural humidity of one’s breath, high temperature requirements, and lack of selectivity.

Priefer has two Western New England University clinics lined up to perform controlled testing with patients in late 2014–early 2015. This testing would compare readings from the breathalyzer, finger pricking, and actual glucose levels from drawn blood. Priefer is planning for patients to test the breathalyzers in an uncontrolled setting in about two years, keeping a diary of their readings and reporting back.

The 2013 AAPS Annual Meeting and Exposition aims to improve global health through advances in pharmaceutical sciences, and there will be 480 exhibits and an estimated 7,500 attendees. The meeting features nearly 105 programming sessions, including more than 50 symposia and roundtables and more than 2,200 posters. Download the AAPS smartphone application for additional information.

Editor’s Note: All press must provide press credentials to attend this meeting and register on-site in the press room #213. To schedule an interview with Dr. Priefer or for any other press inquiry, please contact Hillarie Turner or Dana Korsen at aaps@ecius.net or 202-296-2002. For the most up-to-date program information, please click here.

About AAPS:

The American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists is a professional, scientific association of approximately 11,000 members employed in academia, industry, government and other research institutes worldwide. Founded in 1986, AAPS provides a dynamic international forum for the exchange of knowledge among scientists to serve the public and enhance their contributions to health. AAPS offers timely scientific programs, on-going education, information resources, opportunities for networking, and professional development. For more information, please visit www.aaps.org. Follow us on Twitter @AAPSComms; official Twitter hashtag for the meeting is: #AAPS2013.

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