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Aileron Therapeutics Collaborators Publish In Vivo Research in Nature Showing Stapled Peptides Achieve the First Direct Inhibition of the Notch1 Transcription Factor Oncogene


11/11/2009 1:44:23 PM

CAMBRIDGE, Mass.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Aileron Therapeutics, a biopharmaceutical company leading the development of a new class of drugs called Stapled Peptides, announced today that its collaborators, James E. Bradner, MD of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, and Gregory L. Verdine, PhD, Professor of Chemistry at Harvard University, published research in Nature entitled, “Direct Inhibition of the Notch Transcription Factor Complex.” Results presented in the paper showed that Stapled Peptides can potently and directly inhibit the transcription factor Notch, an oncogene implicated in cancer cell proliferation and survival. This research validates the potential for Stapled Peptides to modulate key intracellular biological targets, such as transcription factors, that have not been addressable with current small molecule or biologic drug modalities. There are estimated to be more than 1,500 transcription factors in the human genome, regulating key biological processes important in diseases such as arthritis, asthma, diabetes, infectious diseases, and canceri.

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