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10 Things to do After Getting Laid Off


6/13/2012 1:58:58 PM

10 Things to do After Getting Laid Off By Bob McIntosh, Career Trainer

I recently saw a question that was posted on the LinkedIn's Answers feature that read, “You just got laid off. Which is more important, start networking or spend a week writing your résumé?”

I thought this was a great question but also believe jobseekers have to think of other important activities when starting their job search after a lay-off. Below are some of the must doe’s for people who are starting their job search.

1. Take time to regroup. This is perhaps one of the most important things you can do when starting your job search. It’s also something people neglect to do by jumping right into the hunt the same day they’re laid off. Conversely, some people wait too long to begin the search, considering this a time to take a “vacation.”

2. Dust off the resume. Ideally you should have been updating your résumé while working, but we know how work demands leave little time to do this, and when we return from a hard day of work we have little if any energy to work on our résumé.

3. Begin telling everyone you know - everyone. That’s right, everyone. You may think your sister in New York would never know of opportunities in Boston, but you never know who she may know who knows someone in Boston. As well, LinkedIn provides the best way to reach more people in more places than any face-to-face networking can accomplish. Don’t focus only on the people with whom you worked; you’re limiting your reach.

4. Assess your greatest skills. This is tough for many people, especially those who have a hard time promoting themselves, so solicit the help of others with whom you worked or know in your daily life. Create a list of your strongest skills and accomplishments. These will make good fodder for your new and improved resume.

5. Get out of the house. One person who answered this question, advised people to visit their local One-Stop career center. This is good advice. Your style might lean more toward attending networking groups, professional affiliations, volunteering, or using your local library’s computers (even if you have your own). Get out of the house.

6. You’re not on vacation, you’re back to work. Finding work is a full-time job. Enough said.

7. Step up your exercising or begin exercising. Nothing is better for the mind than improving your physical condition. You don’t have to join a club. Simply walk every morning or do yoga. Make sure you get up at the same time you rose from bed when you were working. Do not let your routine slip.

8. Think about what you want to do. Now is the time to think about what you really want to do, not what you feel comfortable doing. When I was laid off, I realized that I wanted to change my career. I had direction.

9. Speaking of direction. You need direction in order to conduct a successful job search. Determining your direction could take some contemplation, especially if you’re changing your career. Without direction you’re lost.

10. Develop your company list. Getting there includes knowing what type of companies for which you’d like to work. Identifying the companies can help you with your research on them and career possibilities. Your list will also come in handy when networking with jobseeker groups and informational contacts.

The list of must do’s could be endless, but it’s important to keep in mind the important actions needed to properly start your job search. If you are having difficulty getting motivated, speak to close friends, relatives, or trained job search professionals who can help you with this serious problem. Motivation is required in order to put our plan into action.

Read more biotech career tips. Find more biotech and pharma jobs by visiting the career center.

About the Author

Bob McIntosh, CPRW, is a career trainer at the Career Center of Lowell, where he leads more than 20 workshops on the career search. Bob is often the person jobseekers and staff go to for advice on the job search. As well, he critiques resumes and conducts mock interviews. One of his greatest accomplishments is starting a LinkedIn group, which is one of the largest of its kind in the state, and developing three in-high-demand workshops on LinkedIn. Bob’s greatest pleasure is helping people find rewarding careers in a competitive job market. Please visit Bob's blog at www.thingscareerrelated.wordpress.com.

Check out the latest Career Insider eNewsletter - June 14, 2012.

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