News | News By Subject | News by Disease News By Date | Search News
Get Our FREE
Industry eNewsletter
email:    
   

BioPhysics Assay Laboratory, Inc. Awarded Phase I SBIR Grant For The Design Of A Novel Neutron Activation Device; This Instrument Will Allow Improved In vivo Diagnostic Assays For Drug discovery, Stem Cell tracking, Blood Flow Measurement By Microspheres And Disease Diagnosis


10/19/2005 5:08:54 PM

WORCESTER, Mass.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--June 14, 2005--BioPhysics Assay Laboratory (BioPAL), Inc. announced today that the company was awarded a Phase I Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant from the National Center for Research Resources of the National Institutes of Health. This grant will support the development of an automated accelerator-based neutron generation device to detect and quantify the presence of stable isotope-labeled physiological probes in biological samples without interference from the sample matrix. Medical researchers are moving beyond genomics and molecular biology to understand how the body works at the level of cells, tissues and organs. This interplay between the building blocks of the body is called physiology or systems biology and is the new frontier for discovery of disease pathways that will lead to new therapies. BioPAL has made stable isotope-labeled physiological probes, such as microspheres for blood flow studies and nanocolloids for cell labeling and tracking, available to researchers for several years. However, in order to measure the probes in biological samples, the samples have to be returned to BioPAL to be assayed via a large, fixed neutron generator. This grant award will allow BioPAL to develop a new, more compact device that could be installed at the researcher's or clinician's institution. The new device will have the advantages of faster turnaround, lower costs, and improved data analysis. There is potential for a completely new diagnostic industry built around stable isotope-labeled functional probes because of the new analytical capabilities this technology can provide both researchers and clinicians.

Read at BioSpace.com

comments powered by Disqus
   

ADD TO DEL.ICIO.US    ADD TO DIGG    ADD TO FURL    ADD TO STUMBLEUPON    ADD TO TECHNORATI FAVORITES